Happy Monday –

Here is some interesting news that came from NIH that might offer a new approach to treating some viral infections like the flu or HIV.

Two siblings with a rare genetic disorder that affects the way their bodies attach sugars to proteins seem to have some protection from certain viral infections.

Figuring out what was going on for these two children has made a discovery that sounds like it holds some promise for a new way to interrupt the HIV life cycle.

Below is the press release from NIH, and attached for you is the paper that appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Michael

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Study could offer clues for developing new antiviral treatments

Saturday 12 April 2014 – 12am PST

A National Institutes of Health (NIH) study reports that a rare genetic disease, while depleting patients of infection-fighting antibodies, may actually protect them from certain severe or recurrent viral infections.

Researchers found that HIV and influenza viruses replicate in the cells of people with congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIb (CDG-IIb) at a much lower rate than in healthy donor cells, creating fewer and less infectious viruses.

The study, published in The New England Journal of Medicine, was led by Sergio Rosenzweig, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Primary Immune Deficiency (PID) Clinic at the NIH’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID).

In the study, the researchers diagnosed CDG-IIb in two siblings with severe development issues who were referred to the NIAID PID Clinic though the NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program.

CDG-IIb is extremely rare, with only one other case reported.

The genetic defect of the disease disrupts glycosylation, or the process of attaching sugars to proteins.

As a result, proteins called gamma globulins, which include infection-fighting antibodies, are unstable and persist at low levels in the patients’ blood.

Interestingly, some viruses, including HIV and influenza, depend on glycosylation to form protective shields.

The researchers showed that these viruses were less able to replicate or create protective shields because of the glycosylation defects in CDG-IIb cells.

In comparison, adenovirus, poliovirus and vaccinia virus, which either do not rely on glycosylation or do not form protective shields, replicated normally when added to both CDG-IIb and healthy cells.

This study suggests that modulating aspects of host glycosylation may be a strategy to control certain viral infections.

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Michael Louella

Outreach Coordinator/UW ACTU

CAB Coordinator / defeatHIV

Community Engagement Officer / UW CFAR

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Glycosylation NEJMoa1302846.pdf

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