Resources

Previous Events & Related Materials

Virtual Advising: How Does Technology Impact Our Work?

Tuesday, April 29 from 11:00—12:30 in Deloitte Commons, Paccar Hall (across from Orin's Cafe)

Technology is changing the landscape of student advising like never before. The boundaries between people are disappearing as technology makes it possible for collaboration across physical space. In this session, we will discuss efficiencies and challenges with those who have begun to do virtual advising on campus. We will also discuss access and privacy implications. If you or anyone in your unit does advising in an online platform, we encourage you to come and share your experience.

LGBTQA Ally Development and Advocacy Empowerment for Academic Advisors
(NACADA Webinar)

January 30, 11:00 a.m. in MGH 258

While we have seen significant sociopolitical gains for the North American Lesbian / Gay / Bisexual / Transgender / Queer / Asexual (LGBTQA) community in recent years, work toward fair treatment and healthy development of all individuals is ongoing. Involvement of non-LGBTQA-identified individuals is crucial to the advancement of this work. Many higher education professionals wish to support LGBTQA students, but feel they lack the resources to do so. In this Web Event, sponsored by the NACADA Commission for LGBTQA Advising and Advocacy, our panelists will discuss ally development, advocacy, and engagement, and their application to academic advising. They will consider what the advising literature has explored regarding the needs of LGBTQA-identified students, ally development models, potential roles and responsibilities for allies, and more.

Undergraduate Advising Basics

February 4, 8:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m in MGH 171E

This free 6-hour workshop is intended to provide new undergraduate advisers (those on the job a year or less) with the essentials in getting started advising on the UW campus--an overview of advising and critical student support offices on campus; an introduction to FERPA, EARS, SDB, and the Adviser Information File; and the ins and outs of general education requirements, majors, minors, and graduation procedures.

The Scoop on Internships: From Hype to How-To's

February 5, 9:30 a.m.-11:00 a.m. in HUB 332

Attend this training/discussion and learn:

  • How employers view different types of internship experience when reviewing resumes for full-time hires.
  • How students can (1) find internships to apply to, (2) propose new internship opportunities with employers of interest to them, (3) convince people to hire them as interns, and (4) make a good impression during their internship experience.
  • How you can (1) support students in their quest for internship experience and (2) build a departmental internship program.
  • How the Career Center and its national accrediting body feel about the national unpaid internship debate.

All in the advising community are welcome! We'd love for advisers who have lots of experience with internships to come and share their insights with advisers who are just jumping on-board!

Led by Career Center staffers Briana Randall, Associate Director and Emma O'Neill-Myers, Assistant Director for Employer Relations.

Please RSVP if you are planning to attend.

NACADA Webinar--Soldiers to Students: Academic Advising for Returning Veterans

Wednesday, February 26, 11:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. in MGH 171E

Understanding the needs of returning veterans is crucial to our ability to assist their transition into and persistence through college. In this Web Event, jointly sponsored by NACADA's Advising Veterans, Military Students & Family Members Interest Group and Advising Students with Disabilities Commission, our panelists will consider the impact of deployment cycles and issues veterans may experience and share information and strategies that will aid us in assisting our student veterans, both face-to-face and at a distance. One-hour webinar will be followed by a moderated discussion.

Please RSVP if you are planning to attend.

NACADA Webinar: Developing Intercultural Communication Skills for Academic Advising

Wednesday, December 11, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. in MGH 171E

In this web event, sponsored by NACADA's Global Engagement Commission, our panelists will discuss essential concepts of intercultural communication and their application to academic advising. They will consider the need for paying attention to cultural differences, challenges and opportunities of culturally diverse environments, understanding cultural differences and their impact on academic advising, and more. See more on the NACADA website.

First hour will be the webinar; second hour will be a moderated discussion. Space limited to first 30 RSVP's.

ACT (Advisers, Computing & Technology),

Tuesday, December 17, 10:00-11:30 a.m. in MGH 420

ACT (Advisers, Computing & Technology)--a workgroup open to all, regardless of level of technological expertise or experience. Our goal is to raise awareness regarding new challenges and opportunities that technology offer our work while keeping central in these conversations the ultimate goal of improving student service, both broadly and individually.

Social Media in the Job Search

Thursday, December 19, 9:30-11:00 a.m. in MGH 241

Attend this training/discussion and learn:

  • How employers use social media to source candidates (our students and alumni!)
  • How candidates can use social media to their advantage, and explore careers and network effectively online via social media
  • How you can support students in building positive digital footprints

All in the advising community are welcome...from social media super-users, to those just-getting-started, to those on-the-fence about the value in all of this. Session led by Patrick Chidsey, Senior Career Counselor and Social Media Lead for UW Career Center. RSVP: https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/brianakr/220527

In their own words: International Students’ Transition to UW

Thursday, October 17, 3:15-4:30 p.m. in Gowen 1A

Please join AEP for an informative panel on undergraduate International Students and their transition to the UW community. Our panel of students will speak about their first impressions of campus, discuss navigating the academic environment, and talk about choosing a major. Q&A included. Room capacity is 35, so please RSVP.

2013 Advising Summit

Wednesday, September 4, 8:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. in the Fishery Sciences Building

The theme of this year’s summit is iAdvise: Windows to New Technologies in Advising and Student Services. The advent of internet-based communication has radically altered the way higher education professionals interact with students. The first wave of email and websites have now evolved into social media like Facebook, Twitter and others. Despite an abundance of ways to communicate with our students, they sometimes seem harder to reach than ever before. This conference aims to explore best practices and outcomes utilizing new technologies, as well as the implications of embracing new technology in the face of a rapidly changing online landscape.

Suicide Prevention

Friday, April 26, 10:00-11:30 a.m., MGH 171E
Facilitator: Ellen Taylor, Ph.D., Assistant Vice-President for Student Life, Director of Counseling Center and Clinical Psychologist

One and one-half hour interactive workshop for advisers to increase knowledge, awareness, and skills concerning college student suicide. Advisers are in a unique position to recognize a crisis and the warning signs that someone may be contemplating suicide. Through the use of experiential exercises and open discussion, this workshop will focus on preparing for the situation of interacting with a student in distress including working through feelings of isolation so that they may benefit from referral and connection to resources.

Advising Undocumented Students at the UW

Wednesday, March 13, 9:30-11:30 a.m., Samuel E. Kelly Ethnic Cultural Center

On May 7, 2003, Washington State Governor Gary Locke signed House Bill 1079 into law. It allows undocumented students who have lived in Washington state for at least 3 years and have earned their high school diploma or GED to pay in-state tuition at state colleges and universities. Attend this free two-hour workshop to learn more about the experiences of undocumented students at UW, including:

  • The Basics: learn more about HB 1079 and its impact.
  • Recent developments in immigration policy and law.
  • Hear the experiences of undocumented students at colleges/universities.
  • Q&A with people working at the university to advocate for undocumented students.
  • Apply understanding of the issue to advising skills, including awareness of terminology, sensitivity to the student experience, and knowledge of resources and policies.

Please RSVP through Catalyst.

What's your Green Dot? Information Session for Advisers

Wednesday, February 6th, noon-1pm, MGH 171E

A Green Dot is any action that reduces the risk of violence in the moment, supports survivors or creates a culture less tolerant of power-based personal violence. A Green Dot is your individual choice to make our campus safer. Learn more about how you can support students, faculty and staff in the effort to actively and visibly reduce power-based personal violence at UW.


Bring a lunch and join us! So we can get an estimate of how many people plan on attending, please RSVP through Catalyst.

How Do My Students See Me?

Part 1, "The Boat Game," Thursday, December 6, 10:00 – 12:00 in MGH 171E.
Part 2, "Applications to Advising," Monday, December 17, 10:00 – 12:00 in MGH 420.

This two-part workshop serves to explore the ways in which our individual and social identities matter in our work environment, especially in the contexts of our interactions with students. In Part 1, entitled "The Boat Game," our main objectives will be to raise our consciousness about identities in relationship to others, challenge the power of stereotypes, and examine the consequences of making decisions that are based on notions of difference and diversity. Many advisers completed this segment last March. This is a repeat performance, as we could not accommodate everyone interested in the session, so advisers who completed it already are not eligible to do it again. In Part 2, "Applications to Advising," we will continue our discussions on identities and difference by considering a range of opportunities for enhancing advising practices that enable conditions of fairness and equality. This segment is limited to those who have completed Part 1.

Our workshop facilitator is Rick Bonus. Rick is primarily an associate professor of American Ethnic Studies at the University of Washington, but he also has strong interests in the conjunctions among Ethnic Studies, American Studies, Pacific Islander Studies, and Southeast Asian Studies, particularly as they deal with the historical and contemporary phenomena of migration, transnationalism, interdisciplinary work, and multicultural pedagogy. He teaches courses pertaining to U.S. multiracial society, Filipino American history and culture, ethnographies of Southeast Asia and Southeast Asian America, and education in relationship to race. Rick conducts workshops on teaching for the UW Faculty Fellows program and was a recipient of the UW Distinguished Teaching Award in 2003.

2012 Advising Summit: Expanding Boundaries

Tuesday, September 11, 8:30 a.m. – Noon in the Physics Astronomy Auditorium.

In pursuing higher education, students expand their boundaries—they leave their previous lives to join a community of learners; to embark on a journey of discovery, both of self and the world around them; and to look at and think about things in new ways. As their advisers, we help to expand their boundaries, encouraging them to try new things; consider other perspectives; gain empathy, critical thinking, and sound judgment; and define themselves in the process. The sessions chosen for the annual Advising Summit reflect on this theme, encouraging us to break down old ways of thinking and open ourselves to new perspectives and experiences. We can all continue to grow and evolve; we can all continue to expand our boundaries.

Transfer Appointments During Advising & Orientation: Best Practices

Monday, July 16, 2012, 2:30 p.m.-4:00 p.m. in MGH 258.

Transfer students start arriving for Advising & Orientation this summer on July 18. Do you wonder what all they do while they're here? How best to help them when they are sent to you for an advising appointment? Do you remember how to flag transfer courses in EARS and when you have the authority to do so? Do you have questions about the new scheduling tool for their appointments? Martha Chan (First Year Programs), Megan McConnell (UAA Advising) and Susan Inman (Public Health) will lead a discussion of how best to help incoming transfer students.

Related documents: Transfer Agendas and Insert; Transfer O Training Guidelines; Using the Scheduling Tool for Transfer A&O

UW Champions Program

Thursday, May 3, 2012, 8:30-10:00am, MGH 171E

Sharing is caring! Come learn about the UW Champions Program, serving alumni of the foster care system on campus. Champions Program staff and a peer mentor student will discuss the students that we serve, resources available to them and skills advisers can use when working with alumni of the foster care system. No RSVP necessary.

How Do My Students See Me?

Tuesday, March 13, 2012, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. in MGH 171E.

In this workshop, we will explore the ways in which our individual and social identities matter in our work environment, especially in the contexts of our interactions with students. Our main objectives will be to raise our consciousness about identities in relationship to others, challenge the power of stereotypes, and examine the consequences of making decisions that are based on notions of difference and diversity. In the course of fulfilling these objectives, we will dedicate opportunities to think about advising practices that enable conditions of fairness and equality.

Our workshop facilitator is Rick Bonus. Rick is primarily an associate professor of American Ethnic Studies at the University of Washington, but he also has strong interests in the conjunctions among Ethnic Studies, American Studies, Pacific Islander Studies, and Southeast Asian Studies, particularly as they deal with the historical and contemporary phenomena of migration, transnationalism, interdisciplinary work, and multicultural pedagogy. He teaches courses pertaining to U.S. multiracial society, Filipino American history and culture, ethnographies of Southeast Asia and Southeast Asian America, and education in relationship to race. Rick conducts workshops on teaching for the UW Faculty Fellows program and was a recipient of the UW Distinguished Teaching Award in 2003.

Related documents: Workshop Handout

View video from event (Adobe Connect)

Financial Aid Info & Updates for Graduate Advisers

Tuesday, December 13, 2011, 9:30-10:30 a.m. in MGH 420

Darcy Keller, Assistant Director in the Office of Student Financial Aid, will discuss financial aid requirements and procedures for graduate students. Are students who are completing undergraduate or graduate courses that are required for admission to a graduate program eligible for financial aid? What kinds of non-departmental fellowships or loans are available to graduate students? How can you best help your graduate students with financial need figure out how to fund their education?

View video from event (Adobe Connect)

Financial Aid Info & Updates for Undergraduate Advisers

Tuesday, December 6, 2011, 9:30-10:20 a.m. in MGH 420

Darcy Keller, Assistant Director in the Office of Student Financial Aid, will share basic reminders plus important updates to the Satisfactory Progress guidelines for financial aid recipients. Bring your questions, and learn to help your students plan ahead for financial aid eligibility. Sample topics: What does the FAFSA do? What is the basic financial aid formula? How do scholarships, awards and prizes affect financial aid? What forms are we (advisers) being asked to sign and why? What’s new about Satisfactory Progress for financial aid recipients?

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