FittsStudy FittsStudy data visualizer

Jacob O. Wobbrock
Susumu Harada
Edward Cutrell
I. Scott MacKenzie

Download

Current Version 4.2.4

Windows executable: FittsStudyExe.zip
Source code: FittsStudy.zip

FittsStudy requires the Microsoft .NET 2.0 Framework. Download it here.
This software is distributed under the New BSD License agreement.

About

FittsStudy is for conducting and analyzing pointing studies in accordance with established international and academic standards. Beyond supporting manipulation of A and W, it also supports manipulation of MT with a metronome. Both 1D and 2D pointing tasks are supported based on ISO 9241-9. Other features include automatic calculation of models and measures, exporting results to spreadsheets, and a tool for visual exploration of trials.

If you have any questions or comments, contact me at wobbrock@uw.edu.

Publications

Wobbrock, J.O., Shinohara, K. and Jansen, A. (2011). The effects of task dimensionality, endpoint deviation, throughput calculation, and experiment design on pointing measures and models. Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI '11). Vancouver, British Columbia (May 7-12, 2011). New York: ACM Press, pp. 1639-1648.

Wobbrock, J.O., Jansen, A. and Shinohara, K. (2011). Modeling and predicting pointing errors in two dimensions. Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI '11). Vancouver, British Columbia (May 7-12, 2011). New York: ACM Press, pp. 1653-1656.

Wobbrock, J.O., Cutrell, E., Harada, S. and MacKenzie, I.S. (2008). An error model for pointing based on Fitts' law. Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI '08). Florence, Italy (April 5-10, 2008). New York: ACM Press, pp. 1613-1622.

Acknowledgement

This work was supported in part by Intel Labs, Microsoft Research, and the National Science Foundation under grants IIS-0811063 and IIS-0952786. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this work are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Science Foundation.