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Archives: November, 2012


A Day in the Life of an Undergraduate

UW Senior Alisa Song has generously offered to take us along as she goes through her day at the University of Washington. Alisa is majoring in mathematics and economics, with a minor in international studies, and plans to graduate in June 2013. -Ed.

5:30 a.m.  Alarm goes off. I fall back asleep.

5:33 a.m.  I wake up and go through the morning routine of contemplating the pros and cons of going to my Beginners’ Yoga class at the IMA. I sleepily visualize my morning yoga class. My bed is definitely more comfortable than trying to make my heels touch the ground while attempting a downward dog. On the other hand, skipping class this morning will only make it harder to attend the next class. Plus, I’ve grown particularly fond of my quiet classmates who have struggled with me, class after class.

5:40 a.m.  As usual, I decide to go for it and get out of bed.

6:39 a.m. I am half-awake on the bus ride to campus. There was more traffic than usual today. I get off the bus and realize that I have to sprint toward the IMA if I want to be on time.

6:45 a.m. – 8:00 a.m. After a four-minute sprint through the Burke-Gilman Trail and up a flight of stairs, I arrive at Studio 316 in the IMA. With 30 seconds to spare I am wide-awake, sitting on my squishy yoga mat and ready for class to begin.

Yoga in Studio 316

Bright sunlight fills Studio 316 in the early morning.

9:00 a.m. – 9:20 a.m. I get back to main campus and, with  a couple minutes before my next class, decide to study on the ground floor of Suzzallo Library for a quiz that I will be taking in my first class today.

9:30 a.m. – 11:20 a.m. My Public Relations and Society class is in the Communications building— about a 20-second walk from Suzzallo. This is a morning class, but nearly everyone comes to every session. Today we learn the basics of consumer relations and review case studies from our textbook.

11:30 a.m. Lunchtime! The weather is chilly, so there are only a dozen students hanging out in Red Square. Most students probably chose to eat inside Suzzallo Café or at By George Café. I decide to get food from one of the food trucks on Red Square. I order a BBQ Slider smothered in Carolina Mustard Sauce with a side of Macaroni and Cheese. Since there is no line, my hot food is ready in two minutes.

Food Trucks on Red Square

Food trucks became a popular place for students to get food while the Husky Union Building was being renovated these past two years.

1:30 p.m. – 3:20 p.m. Next, it is time for my International Trade class in Savery Hall, which is located at the bottom of the Quad. This building is the home of the Economics, Sociology and Philosophy Departments and was renovated in 2009. Savery is easily one of my favorite buildings on campus; the building’s exterior retained its original, breathtakingly beautiful look while its indoors were given a modern update with fast elevators, large classrooms and spacious hallways.

4:00 p.m.  By the time my economics class is over, I am in the mood for a hot cup of coffee. I have plans to catch up with a friend I met in a previous economics course. We decide to meet in the basement of the Art building, which hosts Parnassus Café. This café is student-run and serves arguably the best coffee on campus.

6:00 p.m. After coffee, I head to Room 202 in Thomson Hall, where the Jackson School Student Association Club is holding its weekly meeting. Our meeting focuses on an upcoming lecture panel about the crisis in Mali. We put together a list of professors that we will ask to speak during this panel.

6:30 p.m. After nearly 12 hours on campus, it is time for me to take a bus home.

7:30 p.m. It takes me an hour to get home with the evening traffic. At home, I eat spaghetti for dinner with my family.

8:00 p.m. My brother and I both love the television show “Friends.” I have all 10 seasons downloaded on my iTunes, so we spend the next 45 minutes watching a couple episodes together.

9:00 p.m. I don’t have any homework due until the middle of next week. I decide to spend some time on Tumblr, my favorite social media platform. Tumblr is a microblogging website that is mainly photo-based. I devote the next hour to reblogging photos of tantalizing plates of food, beautiful clothes I want to own and impossibly fat puppies.

10:45 p.m. After a long and eventful day, I am ready for sleep. I set my alarm on my phone and fall asleep well before midnight.

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In the Spotlight: Ia Dübois

It was deep budget cuts during a recession that led to one of Ia Dübois’ most enduring classes at the University of Washington.

Not long after starting with the UW in 1992, Dübois brainstormed with a colleague about how to bring more students into classes in the Department of Scandinavian Studies, a part of the College of Arts & Sciences. “What is selling?” Dübois remembers her colleague asking. “Well, sex,” she replied, half-jokingly. That planted the seed for “Sexuality in Scandinavia: Myth and Reality,” which has since become Dübois’ most popular class.

It started with about 45 students that first term in the mid-90s, but “Sexuality in Scandinavia” has grown over the years, reaching 235 students for fall quarter. Throughout the term, Dübois compares and contrasts laws and legislation regarding sexuality in a handful of Scandinavian countries. “It’s a wonderful thing, to teach the differences between the Scandinavian countries, because each country has a different value system,” Dübois said.

She tries to bridge the cultural divide by screening documentaries on subjects with which students might have only a passing familiarity or faint understanding. Those films touch on subjects such as homosexuality, prostitution and trafficking — and how they impact life in Scandinavia. She hopes that students connect those issues to what happens in their own communities. “I really see our teaching as not only the facts, but also to teach the students to become good citizens,” Dübois said.

Dübois, who is a senior lecturer and undergraduate adviser today, also tries to educate students about legal developments and media portrayals that may have informed their own thoughts on sexuality. “I don’t want you to change your mind,” Dübois tells students each quarter. “But, be aware of what is forming your opinion.”

Dübois remains busy outside of the classroom, as well. In October she attended a conference put on by the Association of Swedish Teachers and Researchers in America. It was the kind of eye-opening experience that keeps Dübois motivated after 20 years at the UW. “To be in an environment where you are exposed to really new research, new thinkers, and new interpretations of literature and of culture, I still have to pinch myself at times,” Dübois said.

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Dawg Dash 2012!

A new course and uncertain fall weather didn’t stop nearly 4,000 runners from lining up for the annual Dawg Dash on Sunday, Oct 21. We lucked out with amazing weather—sunshine mixed with crisp fall air—and tremendous enthusiasm for this year’s course. A great group of spirited runners, walkers, dogs and supporters shared the beautiful day on our gorgeous campus. Here are some fun facts/figures from the 27th annual Dawg Dash:

  • 3,762: runners
  • 43: degrees at the start of the 10K
  • 118: kids participated in the Kids Dash
  • 354: photos in our Dawg Dash album
  • 1: years the Dawg Dash finish was in the UW Quad and the Post Dash Bash was held on Red Square

UW President Michael K. Young got the race off on the right foot.

 

Kids had a blast running alongside Harry!

 

We look forward to seeing you next year! For all of the latest updates *like* the Dawg Dash page on Facebook!

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A Bond for the Ages

Everyone who attended UWAA Member Night at “Skyfall” last weekend received a special bonus. We handed out a program featuring an essay that examined how each James Bond actor reflects our times and hopes about the future. The piece was penned by Andrew Tsao, head of the School of Drama’s BA program and host of UWTV’s Backstory: A Filmmakers Vision. Here is Andrew’s essay:

Andrew Tsao

As the Bond franchise continues to update itself, it is worth doing our own bit of detective work as we go along for the ride. What does the latest installment say about our times, and how does the man who plays Bond embody our own hopes and fears about the future?

Connery was a Scottish Bond, lending a roguish edge to the otherwise loyal servant to Her Majesty. To the English, the Scots have always been feared and loathed as barbarians from the north. Having Connery don the Savile Row suits was in itself a bit of social irony.

George Lazenby was Australian. An outlier from the frontiers of England’s cast offs. He was the Bond who lived through the loss of his wife and forever made Bond’s quest for justice personal.

Roger Moore was quintessentially proper, and embodied something shallow and self-absorbed about England, which of course mirrored the England of his Bond’s time (1973-1985) as it went from the anarchic Punk era to the Iron Lady’s cold hand of social Darwinism.

Timothy Dalton brought a brooding darkness to Bond in the late 80’s, perhaps presaging the crisis of purpose the character and England was going through then. Although the Falklands conflict was in 1982, it took the end of the Thatcher era to bring home the permanent decline of Great Britain as a world power.

Pierce Brosnan was Bond from 1995 to 2002. The Blair / Clinton world of micro wars and regional conflict where the enemy and the mission were both confused. He was a bothered Bond, often questioning his superiors and his own motivations.

There were of course other less well-known Bonds, including David Niven and Barry Nelson, on television.

Now we have Daniel Craig. The son of working class parents, he was raised in decidedly un-posh Liverpool. He brings a Stanley Kowalski-like roughness to Bond, yet seems to relish the finer things that are so much a part of Bond’s lifestyle. He is the post 9/11 Bond, and the films he has starred in are defined by an almost celebratory mayhem that continues to surpass itself with each film. Entire city blocks are leveled in chase scenes and massive destruction accompanies the dogged pursuit of villainy. It is as if the cataclysmic destruction we have now experienced in the west due to mass terror attacks has seeped into the Bond films as a kind of pop-catharsis. Craig is not ruffled by the chaos, however. He remains stoic amid the ruins, as if to say: “This is the world we live in. No use fretting about it, let’s just do what we have to do.”

Not a member? Get access to member nights at the movies, discounts, and other great benefits! Join today.

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Huskies in the NBA

Brandon Roy

The NBA tipped off earlier this week, and more than a half a dozen former Huskies are suiting up this season. How are your favorite UW players doing early on?

Quincy Pondexter (’10)

The guard is beginning his third season in the NBA and his second with the Memphis Grizzlies. Pondexter had two steals, three assists and one turnover on Wednesday, but the Grizzlies lost to the L.A. Clippers, 101-92.

Nate Robinson

The energetic point guard, now in his eighth season in the NBA, signed with the Chicago Bulls this off-season. He scored seven points in his Chicago debut, to go along with five rebounds, one assist and three turnovers. The Bulls defeated the Sacramento Kings 93-87 on Wednesday.

Isaiah Thomas (’12)

The 5’9” point guard, drafted in 2011 by the Sacramento Kings, surprised pundits and fans alike when he earned a starting role last season. He had a strong rookie campaign but struggled in his season-opener against Chicago on Wednesday, notching 10 points, one assist and three turnovers in a 93-87 loss.

Spencer Hawes

The sixth-year center, fresh from re-signing with the Philadelphia 76ers this off-season, keyed an opening-night 84-75 victory over the Denver Nuggets on Wednesday. The smooth-shooting Hawes finished with 16 points, 12 rebounds, two assists, three steals, five blocks and three turnovers in the win.

Terrence Ross

The rookie shooting guard, taken eighth overall in the 2012 NBA Draft by the Toronto Raptors, finished with no points and one rebound in his debut on Wednesday. Ross played 6:24 of a 90-88 loss to the Indiana Pacers.

Tony Wroten

Wroten, along with Terrence Ross, led the UW to the best record in the Pac-12 last season. He declared for the NBA draft and was taken 25th overall by the Memphis Grizzlies, who lost to the Clippers, 101-92, on Wednesday. Wroten didn’t play.

Will Conroy (’05) and Brandon Roy

The former UW teammates are reunited this season on the Minnesota Timberwolves. Minnesota has yet to play so far but will kick off its season Friday against the Sacramento Kings.

Roy will return to the NBA after a season away. The former Portland Trail Blazer retired after the 2011 season because of a degenerative condition in his knees, but he signed with Minnesota this off-season. Conroy, meanwhile, played sparingly with the Clippers and Grizzlies in 2006-2007, and the Houston Rockets in 2009-2010.

Which Huskies are you keeping an eye on as the season gets underway? Let us know in the comments!

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