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On campus: Nursing students take pulse of employment opportunities

About 80 nursing students attended the Nursing Career Fair to get the inside track on careers earlier this year.

About 80 nursing students attended the Nursing Career Fair to get the inside track on careers earlier this year.

For roughly 80 nursing students, January’s Nursing Career Fair wasn’t just about finding a job in tough economic times; it was a key step on the path to a post-college career.

The annual event, which took place on Jan. 26, 2013 at UW Seattle’s South Campus Center, brought together nearly a dozen regional recruiters and employers, including Kindred Hospital, the UW Medical Center, and Harborview Medical Center. The UWAA sponsored the career fair. “We were proud to be part of such an exciting event,” said UWAA Executive Director Paul Rucker, ’95, ’02. “It’s great to see so many students getting a jumpstart on their careers.”

Those 10 employers offered advice for those seeking positions or residencies, responded to concerns about the job search process, and gave insight on the day-to-day workings of a hospital. “They were very open to questions and to give advice, and that brought down the barriers,” said Alina Palanchuk, president of the UW Professional Organization of Nursing Students and one of the event organizers.

Palanchuk, who will graduate in June with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing, came to the event with some trepidation. “I wasn’t sure how to start looking for jobs,” she admitted.

So she found it refreshing to talk with employers about finding a job in pediatrics. They explained what skills and attributes are important for pediatric nurses, and encouraged her to talk to a manager about her aspirations. The one-on-one connections gave Palanchuk confidence and hope for the post-college career search. “That’s what the focus is on, and that’s the biggest concern for nursing students,” she said.

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Basketball legend Bill Walton comes to campus

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Bill Walton, speaking on Feb. 13, 2013, at the University of Washington

Few speakers are more qualified to talk about overcoming obstacles and perseverance than basketball legend Bill Walton. He played an integral part on three of the sport’s most celebrated teams while battling a steady barrage of knee and foot injuries. He later overcame a stutter and established a post-playing career as a color commentator. Most recently, he recovered from a debilitating back injury and returned to both broadcasting and public speaking.

So it’s no surprise that basketball was only one of the myriad topics Walton discussed during his visit to the University of Washington last week.

The event was part of the nine-week Walton on Wheels Tour, which featured the basketball legend speaking at Pac-12 schools by day and broadcasting Pac-12 basketball games by night. He arrived on campus to promote–and call–that night’s game between the Huskies and Oregon Ducks.

Walton had plenty of material to draw from during the event. He first rose to national fame as a member of the legendary UCLA basketball team coached by John Wooden; Walton was part of the UCLA team that won 88 consecutive games. He was then taken as the number one overall draft pick by the Portland Trail Blazers in the 1974 NBA Draft and helped lead the franchise to its only NBA title in 1977. Injuries derailed a promising career, but Walton stayed close to the game by becoming a color commentator after retiring.

Walton has since gained acclaim for his positive demeanor, rambling nature, and love of life. It was all on display last week as Walton discussed that evening’s game, his career, his mentors, and the importance of a positive attitude. Here, edited for space and clarity, are a few of Walton’s thoughts:

Walton spoke glowingly about his college coach, John Wooden:

“When you think about what John Wooden taught, he taught us how to think, how to use that library, how to use that smartphone, how to drink deeply from all sources of knowledge. He taught us how to dream, and he taught us how to compete.”

Walton spoke about his heroes, including Muhammad Ali, Martin Luther King Jr., and Bill Russell:

“They lived, they played with passion and purpose. Their life was not about stuff. Their life was not about material accumulation and physical gratification. They were the antithesis of selfishness and greed. If you think of all the problems that we have in whatever it is that we’re facing, it all comes back to selfishness and greed.”

Walton used basketball as a metaphor for life:

“Everybody’s involved. In basketball, you only have to wait for the opening tip. And then there are endless possibilities to make a positive contribution. The same way when you guys get out of bed and put your feet on the floor, you gotta know in your mind, ‘Today, I’m gonna do so many fantastic things that, by the time I get back here to this bed, I’m going to be so tired. I’m gonna win some, I’m gonna lose some, but I’m gonna chase it down. I’m going to build my life, and I’m gonna try to make other people’s lives better.’”

Walton also joked about his reputation as a boisterous, scattershot speaker:

“My wife, she always tells me that my mind is like a slot machine, where the wheels are turning all the time. You never know where it’s going to end up.”

Walton closed by calling on those in attendance to make a difference in the world:

“Make a difference. Walk like a giant in the land. This DOES matter. Come on, hold people to higher standards. If you don’t like what you see, say something! What are they gonna say? ‘You’re wrong?’ You’re not wrong for what you think. You’re entitled to your own beliefs. Come on, let’s go! Get in the game of life. Build it! Build more libraries! Chase it down! Write more books! Stand up there, bring our troops home, let’s go.”

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Q&A: Patrick Lennon, ’09, local star of “Santaland Diaries”

Patrick Lennon

UW alum Patrick Lennon, ’09 (Photo courtesy Susan Doupe)

For many, David Sedaris’ madcap “Santaland Diaries” is a holiday tradition for the new millennium. The essay-turned-stage production follows Sedaris’ season as an elf in Santaland at Macy’s department store. Seattle Public Theater, on the banks of Green Lake, has offered the hour-long, one-man monologue six times in the past eight years.

UW alum Patrick Lennon, ’09, donned the elf hat this year and is currently starring in the production, slated to wrap up on Dec. 24. The Seattle native has acted since middle school but didn’t major in theater, pursuing instead a B.A. from the Jackson School of International Studies. Offstage, Lennon serves as a program assistant for Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences at the UW. Lennon recently talked to the UWAA about his time on campus and “Santaland Diaries.”

Note: This Q&A has been edited for content and clarity.

Why did you pursue a degree in International Studies?

I think it was winter quarter of my freshman year when I took SIS 201 (“The Making of the 21st Century”) with Mary Callahan, and I was completely hooked. As soon as I took it, I was like, ‘I’m done! I have found my major! We are set here.’

I was really happy with that decision. Dr. Callahan was so obviously passionate about the subject, so knowledgeable and engaging. It was like, ‘This is the subject I want to pursue and spend a lot of time digging deeper into.’

Why not theater?

I was very practical and wanted to have a degree that was in something different, not in case acting failed, but more so to be well-rounded. I wanted to have more of a balance in my life.

Read more…

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Dawg Dash 2012!

A new course and uncertain fall weather didn’t stop nearly 4,000 runners from lining up for the annual Dawg Dash on Sunday, Oct 21. We lucked out with amazing weather—sunshine mixed with crisp fall air—and tremendous enthusiasm for this year’s course. A great group of spirited runners, walkers, dogs and supporters shared the beautiful day on our gorgeous campus. Here are some fun facts/figures from the 27th annual Dawg Dash:

  • 3,762: runners
  • 43: degrees at the start of the 10K
  • 118: kids participated in the Kids Dash
  • 354: photos in our Dawg Dash album
  • 1: years the Dawg Dash finish was in the UW Quad and the Post Dash Bash was held on Red Square

UW President Michael K. Young got the race off on the right foot.

 

Kids had a blast running alongside Harry!

 

We look forward to seeing you next year! For all of the latest updates *like* the Dawg Dash page on Facebook!

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A Bond for the Ages

Everyone who attended UWAA Member Night at “Skyfall” last weekend received a special bonus. We handed out a program featuring an essay that examined how each James Bond actor reflects our times and hopes about the future. The piece was penned by Andrew Tsao, head of the School of Drama’s BA program and host of UWTV’s Backstory: A Filmmakers Vision. Here is Andrew’s essay:

Andrew Tsao

As the Bond franchise continues to update itself, it is worth doing our own bit of detective work as we go along for the ride. What does the latest installment say about our times, and how does the man who plays Bond embody our own hopes and fears about the future?

Connery was a Scottish Bond, lending a roguish edge to the otherwise loyal servant to Her Majesty. To the English, the Scots have always been feared and loathed as barbarians from the north. Having Connery don the Savile Row suits was in itself a bit of social irony.

George Lazenby was Australian. An outlier from the frontiers of England’s cast offs. He was the Bond who lived through the loss of his wife and forever made Bond’s quest for justice personal.

Roger Moore was quintessentially proper, and embodied something shallow and self-absorbed about England, which of course mirrored the England of his Bond’s time (1973-1985) as it went from the anarchic Punk era to the Iron Lady’s cold hand of social Darwinism.

Timothy Dalton brought a brooding darkness to Bond in the late 80’s, perhaps presaging the crisis of purpose the character and England was going through then. Although the Falklands conflict was in 1982, it took the end of the Thatcher era to bring home the permanent decline of Great Britain as a world power.

Pierce Brosnan was Bond from 1995 to 2002. The Blair / Clinton world of micro wars and regional conflict where the enemy and the mission were both confused. He was a bothered Bond, often questioning his superiors and his own motivations.

There were of course other less well-known Bonds, including David Niven and Barry Nelson, on television.

Now we have Daniel Craig. The son of working class parents, he was raised in decidedly un-posh Liverpool. He brings a Stanley Kowalski-like roughness to Bond, yet seems to relish the finer things that are so much a part of Bond’s lifestyle. He is the post 9/11 Bond, and the films he has starred in are defined by an almost celebratory mayhem that continues to surpass itself with each film. Entire city blocks are leveled in chase scenes and massive destruction accompanies the dogged pursuit of villainy. It is as if the cataclysmic destruction we have now experienced in the west due to mass terror attacks has seeped into the Bond films as a kind of pop-catharsis. Craig is not ruffled by the chaos, however. He remains stoic amid the ruins, as if to say: “This is the world we live in. No use fretting about it, let’s just do what we have to do.”

Not a member? Get access to member nights at the movies, discounts, and other great benefits! Join today.

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Huskies in the NBA

Brandon Roy

The NBA tipped off earlier this week, and more than a half a dozen former Huskies are suiting up this season. How are your favorite UW players doing early on?

Quincy Pondexter (’10)

The guard is beginning his third season in the NBA and his second with the Memphis Grizzlies. Pondexter had two steals, three assists and one turnover on Wednesday, but the Grizzlies lost to the L.A. Clippers, 101-92.

Nate Robinson

The energetic point guard, now in his eighth season in the NBA, signed with the Chicago Bulls this off-season. He scored seven points in his Chicago debut, to go along with five rebounds, one assist and three turnovers. The Bulls defeated the Sacramento Kings 93-87 on Wednesday.

Isaiah Thomas (’12)

The 5’9” point guard, drafted in 2011 by the Sacramento Kings, surprised pundits and fans alike when he earned a starting role last season. He had a strong rookie campaign but struggled in his season-opener against Chicago on Wednesday, notching 10 points, one assist and three turnovers in a 93-87 loss.

Spencer Hawes

The sixth-year center, fresh from re-signing with the Philadelphia 76ers this off-season, keyed an opening-night 84-75 victory over the Denver Nuggets on Wednesday. The smooth-shooting Hawes finished with 16 points, 12 rebounds, two assists, three steals, five blocks and three turnovers in the win.

Terrence Ross

The rookie shooting guard, taken eighth overall in the 2012 NBA Draft by the Toronto Raptors, finished with no points and one rebound in his debut on Wednesday. Ross played 6:24 of a 90-88 loss to the Indiana Pacers.

Tony Wroten

Wroten, along with Terrence Ross, led the UW to the best record in the Pac-12 last season. He declared for the NBA draft and was taken 25th overall by the Memphis Grizzlies, who lost to the Clippers, 101-92, on Wednesday. Wroten didn’t play.

Will Conroy (’05) and Brandon Roy

The former UW teammates are reunited this season on the Minnesota Timberwolves. Minnesota has yet to play so far but will kick off its season Friday against the Sacramento Kings.

Roy will return to the NBA after a season away. The former Portland Trail Blazer retired after the 2011 season because of a degenerative condition in his knees, but he signed with Minnesota this off-season. Conroy, meanwhile, played sparingly with the Clippers and Grizzlies in 2006-2007, and the Houston Rockets in 2009-2010.

Which Huskies are you keeping an eye on as the season gets underway? Let us know in the comments!

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In the Spotlight: Linda Martin-Morris

Martin-Morris

Dr. Martin-Morris

At first glance, it would have been easy to mistake Dr. Linda Martin-Morris’ neuropharmacology class for a drama or English course.

After all, it’s not every day that a biology teacher works skits and magazine publishing into the syllabus.

But outside-the-box assignments helped make Dr. Martin-Morris a well-regarded lecturer with the thousands of students she’s led since joining the UW in 1994. Not just that, but Dr. Martin-Morris’ friendly demeanor and passion for science led one UWAA member to nominate her for a feature in this space.

Dr. Martin-Morris’ projects and emphasis on team learning in Biology 100 helped students from other majors understand–and enjoy–the brainier side of biology and how drug use impacts neurological functions. “I’ve got drama people in the class, and I’ve got artists in the class,” Dr. Martin-Morris said. “I wanted to make assignments that honor the various skills they bring to the table, not just research and writing skills.”

The long-running class was shelved after the winter 2009 term, despite a student-driven petition to keep the course going. “What my students lost—and what my future students lost—is the opportunity to take a course that was relevant to their world,” Dr. Martin-Morris said. She currently teaches courses on cellular and molecular biology, and how to teach biology.

The spirit of the class lives on. Dr. Martin-Morris, a senior lecturer who will on Sept. 16 be promoted to principal lecturer, is in the third year of a four-year grant project funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

The grant enables Dr. Martin-Morris to train 18 high school teachers around the state as part of the UW in the High School program, which allows high school students to earn UW credit. She led the latest workshop in early August, and is excited that the lessons are finding new audiences. “I refer to this grant project as ‘Bio 100 goes worldwide,’” she said. “There’s a rebirth.”

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Go Purple, Win Gold: Huskies at the 2012 Olympics—Around the World

Athletes come from all over the world to train with and compete for the UW. This year, four countries are represented among the 19 Olympians currently striving for the gold in London. Let’s meet some of our further-flung Dawgs!

Ingvill Måkestad Bovim, ’04, Norway

Ingvill Makstadt Bovim

Ingvill Måkestad Bovim

When Norwegian track star Ingvill Måkestad Bovim lines up in the 1500m semifinals on Monday, it will be the culmination of 15 years of hard work and rigorous training. Måkestad Bovim, a native of Odda, Norway, raced onto the scene at the 1997 Under-20 European Championships, where she took fourth place; she would repeat that feat again in 1999. Måkestad Bovim arrived in 2003 at the UW, where she was one of five new Huskies to compete at the NCAA Championships. Since graduating, Måkestad Bovim has raced for Norway at the 2010 and 2012 European Championships, as well as the 2011 World Championships. She is making her Olympics debut in London, where she is competing in the women’s 1500m race on Aug. 6.

Read more…

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