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Posts Tagged: Student Life


Get a taste of Asia in Red Square at the UW Night Market

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A traditional night market in Keelung, Taiwan. Photo from “Beef No Guy.”

Night markets are a staple of Taiwanese culture. Popping up as the sun goes down, night markets provide cheap eats, consumer goods and entertainment late into the night all over Taiwan and further abroad. Usually held outdoors, night markets frequently take over busy daytime thoroughfares.

Since 2001, the Taiwanese Student Association has been bringing this slice of Taiwanese culture to campus for one night each year. The TSA’s UW Night Market has grown every year, beginning in the HUB ballroom, then moving to the HUB lawn and then to Red Square. Last year’s market drew over 5,000 attendees to partake in Taiwanese snacks, watch bands and traditional performers, and to play games of chance and skill. People come in from all over the region to attend. Some even drive down from Vancouver, B.C.!

This year’s night market, sponsored in part by the UWAA, promises to be the biggest one yet. I had a chat with Ted Chen, one of the student organizers, and he enthused about the menu (“Over 100 items from 13 vendors!”), the entertainment (two UW alumni, known as “The Fung Brothers,” will share the stage with Filipino-American music phenom Joseph Vincent as special guests), and the games (“You can actually win these!”). The food is a particular point of pride for Chen, who pointed out the traditional night market staples—popcorn chicken, bubble tea and stinky tofu—that will be on offer, as well as harder-to-find Taiwanese specialties like Hakka cuisine, baked pastries and Taiwanese sausages.

The UW Night Market is open to the public. It starts at 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, May 11 and will close around 10:30. Campus parking is free after noon on Saturdays. The UWAA is proud to be supporting a vibrant campus life; why don’t you stop by and check it out?

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Throwback Thursday: The Quad

We here in the UW Alumni Association are hopping aboard the “Throwback Thursday” bandwagon by sharing photos from the University of Washington’s storied history. We could think of no better way to launch this series on our blog than with photos of the Quad and those beautiful cherry blossoms.

The Yoshino cherry trees, which blossom for a week or two every March, symbolize the end of winter, the onset of spring, and countless photo opportunities in the Quad. But it wasn’t always that way.

Here, for example, was the Quad in 1942. Notice anything missing?

The Quad (circa 1942)

The Quad (circa 1942)

Until the early 1960s, the Quad was an open, treeless yard that bore little resemblance to the iconic gathering space of today. The brick paths were almost replaced with asphalt in 1963, but the plan was abandoned in the wake of pressure from student groups.

The Quad as we know it today first took shape in 1964, when UW President Charles Odegaard arranged for the 31 cherry trees to be transplanted from the arboretum to keep them from being bulldozed as part of the State Route 520 construction project. They found a home in the Quad because there was nowhere else to put them, but the trees quickly became a cherished part of campus lore.

Yoshino cherry trees live for 60-100 years; as they grow old and die, the trees are replaced with younger trees grown at a nursery near Mount Vernon.

Walk through the Quad this week or next — when the blossoms are near full bloom — and you’ll see a stunning display of pink clouds delicate petals. But don’t take our word for it; see for yourself in this photo, which was taken in 2013 near the location of the photo above:

The Quad in 2013 (Photo by Greg Flanders)

The Quad in 2013 (Photo by Greg Flanders)

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On campus: UW students find their “Voice”

Two student groups hosted the Voice of UW, a talent competition, earlier this year.

Two student groups hosted the Voice of UW, a talent competition, earlier this year.

When the “The Voice of China” – a Chinese off-shoot of the popular NBC reality talent show “The Voice” – debuted in 2012, some UW students saw the chance to showcase the talent on campus. That led members of the Chinese Students and Scholars Association and Taiwanese Overseas Student Association to create the Voice of UW, a month-long singing competition that culminated in a final competition in Kane Hall earlier this year. It  was one of several student-run events the UWAA is sponsoring this year. “We’re proud of our sponsorship,” said UWAA Executive Director Paul Rucker, ’95, ’02. “It’s part of our ongoing commitment to enhancing the student experience.”

Sixty students initially signed up for the Voice of UW competition; following the format of the TV show, they performed Chinese pop songs before four judges whose backs were turned. Sixteen students were invited to take part in the second round, which consisted of duets. The top eight finishers then competed in the final competition, which took place on Feb. 16 before 600 students in Kane Hall.

Vera Tao, a member of the Chinese Students and Scholars Association and one of the event organizers, said the Voice of UW created a sense of camaraderie between the audience and singers. “It’s not just a singing competition,” she said. “It’s more like a performance.”

All eight participants received $50; other prizes included coupons to EnKore Karaoke and iPod Shuffles. The winner, Jingyi Fan, also won a set of headphones. More than the prizes, though, the Voice of UW gave students a chance to have fun and share their talent in front of peers, Tao said. “Some of them, it’s the first time in their life singing in front of a lot of people.”

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On campus: Nursing students take pulse of employment opportunities

About 80 nursing students attended the Nursing Career Fair to get the inside track on careers earlier this year.

About 80 nursing students attended the Nursing Career Fair to get the inside track on careers earlier this year.

For roughly 80 nursing students, January’s Nursing Career Fair wasn’t just about finding a job in tough economic times; it was a key step on the path to a post-college career.

The annual event, which took place on Jan. 26, 2013 at UW Seattle’s South Campus Center, brought together nearly a dozen regional recruiters and employers, including Kindred Hospital, the UW Medical Center, and Harborview Medical Center. The UWAA sponsored the career fair. “We were proud to be part of such an exciting event,” said UWAA Executive Director Paul Rucker, ’95, ’02. “It’s great to see so many students getting a jumpstart on their careers.”

Those 10 employers offered advice for those seeking positions or residencies, responded to concerns about the job search process, and gave insight on the day-to-day workings of a hospital. “They were very open to questions and to give advice, and that brought down the barriers,” said Alina Palanchuk, president of the UW Professional Organization of Nursing Students and one of the event organizers.

Palanchuk, who will graduate in June with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing, came to the event with some trepidation. “I wasn’t sure how to start looking for jobs,” she admitted.

So she found it refreshing to talk with employers about finding a job in pediatrics. They explained what skills and attributes are important for pediatric nurses, and encouraged her to talk to a manager about her aspirations. The one-on-one connections gave Palanchuk confidence and hope for the post-college career search. “That’s what the focus is on, and that’s the biggest concern for nursing students,” she said.

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Budget woes all the talk in UW community right now

Cherry blossoms on the UW campus
The state legislative session is in full swing and there has been lots of coverage recently about the University of Washington’s budget woes.

On April 3, the Seattle Times reported budget cuts have forced UW officials to admit more out-of-state students this year, thus decreasing the number of in-state applicants who were accepted. The story, titled “Straight-A’s may not get you into the UW this year,” has generated an astonishing 700-plus comments on the Times website.

UW gives us what we asked for is today’s headline from columnist Danny Westneat, who argues the budget situation at UW is exactly what the state asked for when it demanded the UW do “more with less.” Westneat says declining state support strong-arms the UW into operating more like a business.

It’s clearly a critical time for all of us who love the UW. More information can be found on the new UW In Your Community map, and alumni can read UW Alumni Association President Colleen Fukui-Sketchley’s letter to members in the March issue of Columns.

Now, the happy return of Dawg Treats:

  • UW Lecturer Ali Tarhouni was named finance minister of the shadow government in Libya. In a March 16 interview with Voice of America, the former Foster School of Business senior lecturer said, “There’s no fear of Gadhafi and his forces. We know he’s gone. … The question is how many innocent lives he’s going to take with him.” Read more about Tarhouni from the Seattle Times.
  • Sadly, a 20-year-old UW sophomore was killed during an avalanche while snowboarding near Stevens Pass. A candlelight vigil was held for Riley McCarthy on the UW campus March 31.
  • Former Husky quarterback Jake Locker impressed NFL scouts at Washington’s Pro Day at Dempsey Indoor.
  • UWTV recently debuted two new shows that feature independent film making and contemporary performances from the UW’s Chamber Dance Company. UWTV also won three prestigious Telly Awards!
  • UW alum Joe Sutter, the famed chief engineer of the original Boeing 747, had his initials carved into the 747-8 that made its maiden flight March 20.

    Read more…

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Isaiah Thomas leaving UW early for the NBA Draft

Isaiah Thomas leaving UW for NBA Draft

I’m sure you’ve heard the news by now, but Washington’s talented point guard Isaiah Thomas is putting his name into the 2011 NBA Draft. The junior from Tacoma is not hiring an agent right away, but he assured reporters at a 1 p.m. press conference that he is, indeed, gone for good.

From all of us at the UW Alumni Association—thank you, Isaiah, and good luck!

A local star from Curtis High School, Thomas stayed close to home and led the Huskies to their first outright Pac-10 title in 56 years as a freshman (pictured above). Last year, he helped Washington reach the Sweet 16, and this season he guided the Dawgs to their second-straight Pac-10 tournament title and a win over Georgia in the second round of the NCAA Tournament.

This kid bleeds Washington, and we wish him the very best in the NBA.

For more on Isaiah Thomas:

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The Great Rose Bowl Hoax of 1961 – Fifty years later

Cal-Tech's Great Rose Bowl Hoax of 1961Fifty years ago, a group of pesky Cal-Tech students hijacked the University of Washington’s halftime “flip-card” stunt in a Rose Bowl prank for the ages.

The Los Angeles Times tells the story of Lyn Hardy, the ringleader behind one of the greatest college football stunts of all time. UW fans on one side of the stadium were given flip cards that were supposed to spell out “WASHINGTON” but instead read “CALTECH.” It’s a marvelous tale, and you can read the full story here.

Hardy, now 69, says he learned how the stunt worked from UW cheerleaders. Upon learning the Husky Marching Band and Cheer Squad were staying at Long Beach State dormitories, Hardy—a Cal-Tech junior at the time—posed as a reporter for the Dorsey High student newspaper and walked right in. When everyone left for dinner, Hardy and another of Cal-Tech’s legendary “Fiendish 14″ swiped a card-stunt instruction book and headed back to Pasadena, where they made some 2,400 copies.

Jack Briggs
, Washington’s 1961 student body president, said at the time that the prank was “not in the best of taste.” Fifty years later, though, it’s still a classic.

Of course, Washington beat top-ranked Minnesota that day 17-7.

Enjoy this week’s Dawg Treats:

  • UW alum Nick Handy is departing his post as Washington’s state elections director after leading widely praised reform efforts that have boosted voter turnout.
  • A study by UW researcher Daryl Haggard explores the future of the Milky Way’s central black hole.
  • UW students win $40,000 to help make water safe to drink.
  • Former UW President Mark Emmert, now the head of the NCAA, is profiled in this piece by the New York Times. The story focuses on overseeing integrity and the threat of income in college sports.

    Read more…

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UW degrees made possible for working professionals

Thinking about going back to school while you work?

The University of Washington makes it possible for those wanting to complete the undergraduate degrees they started. UW Professional & Continuing Education is celebrating 20 years of the Evening Degree Program. More than 2,000 students have graduated from the program, and nearly half did so between the ages of 26 and 35. Some returned to school decades after starting and then suspending their studies.

And for professionals wondering how to fit grad school into their busy lives, the UW recently hosted a panel discussion featuring three professionals who earned graduate degrees while working full-time: Cyndy Clegg, assistant director of Ambulatory Pharmacy Services at Harborview Medical Center, earned an Executive Master of Health Administration in 2007; Jeremy Snook, senior business development & strategy manager for Microsoft Game Studios, completed a Master of Communication in Digital Media in 2009; and Kelli Bixby Bays, a construction project manager for REI, is a graduate of the Master of Science in Construction Management.

These alumni successfully went back to school while continunig to work their day jobs. That’s a hallmark of UW Professional & Continuing Education, which offers more than 125 certificate programs, dozens of graduate and undergraduate degrees and hundreds of courses—in the evening, on weekends and online. 

Here are 12 tips from those who survived the experience. Thrived in it, actually.

Alison Koop of PCE says, “What I found most inspiring: each grad rediscovered a hunger for learning. They called the experience ‘empowering.’ It was a very satisfying experience, returning to school as an adult. And to their surprise, they found their professional skills (giving presentations, writing business proposals, etc.) really put them ahead in school. So, yes, you can teach an old Dawg new tricks! Even while he keeps his day job.”

Here are this week’s Dawg Treats:

  • After jumping 375 percent over the last 20 years, a report by the UW’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluations (IMHE) shows that global health funding slowed to just 6 percent.
  • From Time magazine, Dr. Wendy DeMartini of UW Medical Center reports that MRIs are an important tool in helping women detect more cases of breast cancer.
  • UW Provost Mary Lidstrom says more budget cuts are coming.
  • The UW’s Master of Communication in Digital Media (MCDM) hosted a rapid response public conversation on the Wikileaks debate. This is being called a defining moment for the Internet. Read an extensive post on the subject by Adjunct Professor Ken Rufo.
  • Matthew Nienow, a 2010 UW graduate, was selected from over 1,000 applicants as one of this year’s Creative Writing Fellows from the National Endowment for the Arts. The prize is worth $25,000.

    Read more…

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