People

Welcome to the directory! Click on a name to go to an individual’s profile page.

Note: Unless otherwise specified, please add @astro.washington.edu to email addresses in the directory.

Faculty

Name
Position
Office
Phone
Email
Professor
B370
206-543-7106
agol@

Eric Agol studies extrasolar planets, binary stars, and gravitational lensing. He uses analytic computations, numerical simulations, and observations to discover and characterize these objects. With collaborators, he was the first to propose that radio observations could be used to image the shadow of the event horizon of a black hole and the first to create an infrared longitudinal map of an extrasolar planet. He has written computer code used to characterize over 2000 transiting extrasolar planets, and he has proposed a novel technique for finding planets as small in mass as the Earth.

Professor and Chair
C306
206-685-2392
anderson@

Scott Anderson’s current research interests focus on observational studies of accretion driven phenomena, including quasars and compact binaries. Along with affiliated students and postdocs, Anderson makes use of data from a variety of ground- (e.g., ARC 3.5m) and space-based instruments (e.g., Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-ray Observatory). He is also actively involved in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and is the co-PI (with P. Green of CfA) of the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey in SDSS-IV. Anderson teaches courses related to high energy astrophysics and radiative processes.

Professor Emeritus
C308
206-543-7683
balick@

My primary interests are the formation, evolution, and chemistry of planetary nebulae (“PNe”)*.  The processes that form and shape PNe remain amount the least understood facets of stellar evolution.  I use images and spectroscopy to understand an interpret their shapes and internal motions.  From this my colleagues and I generate hydrodynamical models of their evolution and probe their significance in the cosmic enrichment of helium, carbon and nitrogen. *95% of all stars that we see in our own galaxy, the Milky Way, will ultimately become “planetary nebulae”. This includes the Sun. Much as a butterfly emerges when its chrysalis is ejected, planetary nebulae are formed when a red giant star ejectes its outer layers as clouds of luminescent gas, revealing the dense, hot, and tiny white…

Research Assistant Professor
B376
206-543-8979
rory@

Rory Barnes is a theorist in the Virtual Planetary Laboratory primarily interested in the formation and evolution of habitable planets. He focuses on planets in and around the “habitable zones” of low-mass stars, showing how their composition, orbital oscillations, and tidal processes affect our concept of planetary habitability. He has also worked extensively on the orbital evolution of giant exoplanets, demonstrating that most multiple planets systems appear packed, meaning no more can exist between those that are known. He is the editor of the book “Formation and Evolution of Exoplanets” (Wiley-VCH). Rory is also a member of the Astrobiology Program, the SDSS-III MARVELS collaboration, the APOSTLE survey of transiting exoplanets, and the N-Body Shop.

Research Associate Professor
C327
becker@

My research interests in the past have focused on detecting and following-up unusual microlensing events in real-time (with MACHO, GMAN, and MPS). However, my pursuits have since broadened to the generalized problem of detecting and classifying astronomical variability regardless of type (with DLS, SDSS, and LSST). In particular, if one wants to recognize rare classes of transient events, the background of more prosaic astronomical variability must first be recognized and removed. Modern surveys that simultaneously survey faint, fast, and wide are now at a threshold where we expect these new sorts of discoveries. Accomplishing this will require advances in the integration of computing and information management necessary to extract and model astronomical variability information in real-time. Recent science pursuits include:…

Professor
C331
206-543-8575
brownlee@

Don’s primary research interests focus on the origin and evolution of planetary materials, planets and planetary systems. He is extensively involved with the laboratory study of primitive materials from asteroids and comets and he is PI of the NASA’s Stardust comet sample return mission. He is also a member of the UW Astrobiology program and he has recently co-authored two books with UW paleontologist Peter Ward on the Earth’s evolution to become a habitat for advanced life and the remarkable aspects of the processes involved as viewed from the perspectives of space and time.

Professor
B355
206-543-9541
ajc@

My work focuses on using large surveys to study cosmology and the evolution of galaxies. This ranges from studying the clustering of galaxies and their evolution with redshift, weak gravitational lensing of galaxies, and estimating the properties of galaxies based on their colors (aka photometric redshifts). The common theme to this work is addressing the need for massive data sets and how to work with them. One area that interests me a lot at the moment is the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) where I lead the development of simulations of what LSST might observe. Beyond cosmology, I am also interested in how to make the technologies that companies use to search the internet useful in research and education. As…

Professor
B382
206-685-2155
jd@

Julianne Dalcanton works on galaxy formation and evolution, focusing primarily on what can be learned in the nearby universe. Her group is currently working on several large projects studying the resolved stellar populations of nearby galaxies using HST, their neutral gas distribution with the VLA, and their stellar mass, dust, and star formation properties with Spitzer. She also works closely with the N-body shop on the interface between observation and numerical theory.

Lecturer
C324
206-543-4858
ojf@uw.edu

Oliver guides hundreds of students each year through Astro 101 classes that develop spatial and quantitative reasoning skills, as well as classes focused on written and oral communication of scientific ideas. He also supports teaching astronomy in public schools and beyond with the Astronomy Education Clearinghouse, the UW in the High School Program, and the UW Mobile Planetarium.

Research Professor
B378
-
fabio.governato@gmail.com

I am Research Professor at the UW Astronomy Department. My main research field is cosmic structure formation. Using computer simulations I try to understand how Galaxies, Super Massive Black Holes and Galaxy Clusters formed out of dark matter, baryons, and dark energy… and a lot of physics. It is a rapidly changing, fascinating field, that rewards a vivid imagination,  independence, attention to details and collaborative work.  I often collaborate with  UW professors Jessica Werk, Tom Quinn and Matt Mc Quinn.

Professor
C305
206-685-2236
slh@

Suzanne Hawley works in stellar astrophysics, particularly in the areas of magnetic activity, low mass stars, brown dwarfs and variable stars. In addition, she studies star clusters, the stellar content of dwarf galaxies, and galactic structure. She is co-author of a graduate textbook with Neill Reid entitled “New Light on Dark Stars” (Springer-Praxis). Suzanne also serves as the Director of the ARC 3.5-m telescope at Apache Point Observatory.

Professor Emeritus
C333
206-543-6307
hodge@

My research interests include Local Group galaxies, modes of star formation, star clusters and their formation, HII regions in galaxies, meteorite craters.

Professor
B357
206-543-9375
ivezic@

Željko Ivezić (pronounced something like Gel-co Eva-zich) obtained undergraduate degrees in mechanical engineering and physics from the University of Zagreb, Croatia, in 1990 and 1991. He obtained Ph.D. in physics from the University of Kentucky in 1995, where he worked on dust radiative transfer models and wrote the code Dusty. He moved on to Princeton University in 1997 to work on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and took a professorship at the University of Washington, Seattle, in 2004. Željko’s scientific interests are in detection, analysis and interpretation of electromagnetic radiation from astronomical sources. His current obsession is the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project, for which he serves as the Project Scientist.

Associate Professor & Senior Data Science Fellow
C320
mjuric@

I’m interested in astronomical ‘Big Data’: developing and applying methods and algorithms that let us use large data sets to answer research questions. Major astronomical surveys of today are routinely collecting hundreds of terabytes of images, creating databases with billions of objects and several billion measurements. Large surveys astronomers are becoming part data scientists. In my research, I go where the data takes me — I’ve worked on topics ranging from asteroids in the Solar System, Galactic structure, to the scale structure of the universe. My current focus is using survey data to understand the structure and evolution of the Milky Way. I also lead the Data Management team for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, a project to build the…

Senior Lecturer
C335
206-685-7856
anamunn@uw.edu

My interests lie in teaching multi-level astronomy courses incorporating active student participation in lectures, labs, and on-line exercises, and curriculum development for these courses, including a published lecture activity book: Learning Astronomy by Doing Astronomy – Collaborative Lecture Activities. Members of the League of Astronomers and I are involved in a long-term project doing photometry of little-studied open clusters to determine stellar metallicities based on Stromgren observations at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory in Victoria, BC.  I am involved in the outreach program here, primarily with the Jacobsen Observatory, and in teaching students how to give great scientific public talks.

Senior Lecturer
B349
206-221-7949
laws@

My primary interest is working with students – both in and out of the Astronomy major – to get all they can from their time here at the University. I dedicate most of my working hours to developing the courses I teach, and to mentoring those students who wish to extend the reach of their education beyond the classroom. I also directly investigate ways of improving the experiences of undergraduates in Astronomy, and have led the development in recent years of University-sponsored Learning Goals for our undergraduates, along with metrics to assess the department’s performance in helping students to meet those goals. Finally, I’m an adjunct member of a number of active observational research programs, focused primarily (but not exclusively!)…

Assistant Professor
C327
emsque@uw.edu

Emily Levesque’s research interests are focused on massive stellar astrophysics and the use of massive stars as cosmological tools. Her current research program includes panchromatic observations and models of star-forming galaxies and their young stellar populations; host galaxy and progenitor studies of massive star transients such as LBVs, supernovae, and long-duration gamma-ray bursts; surveys of evolved massive stars in and beyond the Local Group; and the properties of Thorne-Zytkow objects.

Professor Emeritus
C335
206-685-7856
jlutz@

Professor Lutz is interested in understanding the physical characteristics of planetary nebulae and their central stars and how these objects fit into the patterns of stellar evolution. She also analyzes the spectra of symbiotic stars (binaries containing an evolved hot star and a cool star) to determine their chemical compositions, velocities and variability. She has broad interests in astronomy education, including working with K-12 educators, museums, science centers and after-school program.

Assistant Professor
B372
206-685-2112
mcquinn@uw [*dot*] edu

Matt is a theoretical astrophysicist and cosmologist.  He works on testing models for the intergalactic medium, predicting the observational signatures of the first galaxies, and modeling the large-scale structure of the Universe.

Professor
B374
206-543-0206
vsm@

Victoria Meadows is an astrobiologist and planetary astronomer whose research interests focus on acquisition and analysis of remote-sensing observations of planetary atmospheres and surfaces. In addition to studying planets within our own Solar System, she is interested in exoplanets, planetary habitability and biosignatures. Since 2000, she has been the Principal Investigator for the Virtual Planetary Laboratory Lead Team of the NASA Astrobiology Institute. Her NAI team uses models of planets, including planet-star interactions, to generate plausible planetary environments and spectra for extrasolar terrestrial planets and the early Earth. This research is being used to help define signs of habitability and life for future extrasolar terrestrial planet detection and characterization missions.

Professor
B380
206-685-9009
trq@

Tom leads the N-body shop, where he works on running and analyzing N-body simulations of structure formation in the Universe and planet formation. His other research interests include Galactic and Solar System dynamics. He is a member of the UW Astrobiology program.

Lecturer
C315
206-543-9430
nms21@uw.edu

My interests involve teaching astronomy, primarily introductory astronomy courses for undergraduates, with the goal of incorporating the latest active-learning techniques for large classes to give students here the best in-person experience possible.  I spend roughly half of my time working on the development of these courses, which includes both section lab exercises and online activities.  The other half of my time is  devoted to the expansion of our online presence where I’m currently developing online versions of our in-person classes to reach more students and provide the same high-quality experience they should expect from our department.

Senior Lecturer
C338
206-616-2959
smith@

My primary research and teaching interests are focused on the processes that shape the surfaces of the worlds of our solar system. In particular, my research has focused on investigating and sampling terrestrial meteorite craters to study the physical process that create and distribute meteoritic material around them. My primary teaching interests are the geological processes and history of the solar system and the history of the Apollo Lunar missions.

Professor Emeritus, joint with History of Science
C318
206-543-7773
woody@

Professor Sullivan’s interests are in astrobiology, in particular the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI), as well as the history of astronomy. Recent SETI activity has included a collaboration with the Serendip group, using the Arecibo 1000-foot dish for an all-sky search for a wide variety of signal modulation at 21 cm (seti@home project). History of astronomy research has been on the twentieth century, in particular the development of early radio astronomy (Cosmic Noise: A History of Early Radio Astronomy,2009) and ideas about extraterrestrial life, as well as a long-term project designed to produce a biography of William Herschel. Together with John Baross (Biological Oceanography) he has produced the graduate textbook Planets and Life: The Emerging Science of Astrobiology (2007).

Professor
C311
206-543-1988
szkody@

Professor Szkody uses a multiwavelength approach to study close binary stars with active mass transfer (Cataclysmic Variables). Her current research involves ultraviolet observations with the Hubble Space Telescope  as well as APO and ground-based optical facilities around the world.  She is currently finding the faintest, lowest mass transfer CVs  leading to insights into the nature of mass transfer and accretion onto magnetic and non-magnetic white dwarfs,  accretion disks and their X-ray-emitting boundary layers, stellar coronae, and the effects of irradiation on the upper atmospheres of late-type secondary stars.

Assistant Professor
C315
206-543-9430
tuttlese@uw.edu

Sarah Tuttle is primarily an instrumental astrophysicist who dabbles in observations of nearby galaxies. Her work is focused on novel approaches to observing faint and diffuse matter, as well as techniques supporting integral field spectroscopy. Her past work involved using UV spectroscopy to try and detect the intergalactic medium. She was also the instrument scientist for VIRUS – a massively replicated spectrograph currently coming online at McDonald Observatory to detect dark energy at intermediate redshifts.  Professor Tuttle’s current interests include novel materials for astronomical gratings and filters, as well as approaches to bring polarimetry (and spectropolarimetry) to small telescopes.

Professor Emeritus
B347
206-543-8098
wall@

Professor Wallerstein’s research is oriented around the chemical composition of stellar atmospheres. These are important clues to the composition to the origin of the star and its evolution. Stars reflect the environments of their formation by the composition of the gasses in their atmospheres. For example, stars formed 10-15 billion years ago in globular clusters show that these clusters ceased to produce the heavy elements seen in the Sun after only 1 percent of the solar level of heavies were produced. Other stellar atmospheres show a composition which was changed by nuclear reactions in their interiors. Prof. Wallerstein works closely with his students in observations at the telescope and the analysis of these data using computer models of stellar atmospheres….

Assistant Professor
C322
206-543-0777
jwerk@uw.edu

Jessica Werk studies the extended gaseous components of galaxies and the role they play in galaxy formation and evolution. She is primarily an observational astronomer with expertise in optical and ultraviolet spectroscopy, and uses both ground and space-based telescopes to carry out her research. She works closely with theorists in defining observational constraints for cosmological simulations (such as those generated in the UW N-body shop), and in physically interpreting her own observations.

Research Assistant Professor
C313
206-543-9849
benw1@uw.edu

Research Interests: Galaxy evolution and stellar evolution using observations of nearby galaxies.  In particular, I am heavily involved in Hubble Space Telescope, Chandra X-ray Observatory, and XMM-Newton surveys of galaxies within 10 Mpc.  By resolving the individual stars and X-ray sources of these galaxies with these great observatories, we can learn how these galaxies have come to appear as they do today.

Researchers

Name
Position
Office
Phone
Email
Research Scientist
B321
206-543-4230
kfindeis@uw.edu

I am a software engineer affiliated with the LSST project’s data management group. I work to help ensure that LSST will be able to quickly and reliably process its own flood of data. I’ve previously worked on other large surveys, particularly Gaia and the Palomar Transient Factory.

Research Scientist
C308
mlg3k@uw.edu

I currently work with the LSST Data Management team as a Project Science Analyst. My main research focus is supernovae, especially those of Type Ia.

Research Scientist
B356F
206-616-2788
psgupta@

Coming soon!

Research Scientist
C325
206-543-9487
ljones@

Coming soon!

Research Scientist
C315
206-543-9430
joswiak@

Coming soon!

Research Scientist
C325
206-543-9487
krughoff@

Using the SDSS spectroscopic sample we are looking for transient signals using the PCA decomposition of the galaxy spectra. Specifically we are finding type Ia supernovae superimposed on the host galaxy spectrum. Using this sample of SNe we have been able to calculate the nearby type Ia supernova rate. Research facilitation: One of my main interests is facilitating research in the era of big data in astronomy. As datasets (both catalog and imagery) grow to sizes too large to harbor effectively on a single desktop machine, the astronomical community must rethink how things get done. In an effort to probe new ways to do things, I’ve been involved in several projects to put exploratory science on the web (where it…

Research Scientist
B330C
206-543-5280
nmac@

Coming soon!

Research Scientist
anjum@

White dwarf stars are the stellar remains of 98-99% of stars in the sky. Anjum chose to work on pulsating white dwarfs in particular because pulsations allow us to probe deep in the interior of the star, not otherwise accessible for a systematic study. A unique model fit to the observed periods of the variable white dwarf can reveal information about the stellar mass, core composition, age, rotation rate, magnetic field strength, and distance. In collaboration with Dr. Paula Szkody, Anjum also works on accreting white dwarfs that show pulsations. These systems are of great interest to both the pulsating white dwarf community and the cataclysmic variable community.

Research Scientist
B330B
206-543-2859
rowen@uw.edu

I am a software developer working on data processing software for the LSST project. I also spent many years working on control software for Apache Point Observatory.

Research Scientist
B311
parejkoj@uw.edu

I started mining data in SDSS, and am now am digging in the LSST codebase, looking for beautiful gems of transient knowledge as part of the UW LSST Alerts Production team. Our goal: to find all the things that go bump in the night. Prior to this, I  measured galaxy clustering in SDSS and BOSS, and studied galaxies and the black holes that love them for my thesis.

Research Scientist
B345
mtpatter@uw.edu

I’m currently working with the LSST’s data management group on the alert production pipeline.  In graduate school I studied galaxy evolution and formation through studies of faint gas and stars in galaxy outskirts from deep optical and radio data. My dissertation focused on characterizing star formation in galaxy outer disks and the role of accretion of gas and faint companions in galaxy evolution. As a postdoc, I worked on data intensive analysis pipelines in the cloud before returning to astronomy to work on the LSST transient alert stream.

Research Scientist
reiss@uw

Coming soon.

Research Scientist
B330A
206-685-8762
csayres

I am a software engineer for Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Apache Point Observatory, and Las Campanas Observatory.  I’m involved in a variety of projects with a focus on telescope and instrument control, and user interfaces.  When I’m off-campus, I try to end up in the mountains aiming a pair of skis, a kayak, a mountain bike, or a telescope (trying very hard not crash).

Research Assistant
206-504-0189
trujjd@uw.edu

I work for the APOGEE south survey on the infrastructure side of things. For information on the survey visit the SDSS website.

Research Scientist
B351
206-616-4549
yoachim@

Peter Yoachim is a staff scientist working with LSST on issues of telescope scheduler optimization and calibration.  Scientifically, I work on galaxy formation and evolution, particularly using IFU observations to measure galaxy dynamics and star formation histories.

Post-Docs

Name
Position
Office
Phone
Email
Post-Doc
rbiswas@uw.edu

Coming soon!

Post-Doc
B366
kimbott@uw.edu

Kim Bott’s research centres around planetary atmospheres and polarimetry, combining instrumentation, observation, and computer models.  Her work at UW is focused on determining the usefulness of polarimetry in exoplanet characterisation, and also on the habitability of terrestrial worlds orbiting M dwarfs.  Her previous work involved applications of polarimetry to debris disks, stars and the ISM; combining polarimetry with transit and secondary eclipse data for hot Jupiters; and the measurement of isotopes in the atmospheres of ice giants.

Post-Doc
B356
206-616-2788
bcharnay@uw.edu

I am a NPP fellow interested in understanding (exo)planetary atmospheres using 3D models (GCMs). During my PhD, I worked on the dynamics of Titan’s troposphere, paleoclimates of Titan and the climates of the early Earth. Now, I am investigating the formation, dynamics and observational impacts of clouds and photochemical haze around super-Earths/mini-Neptunes (e.g. GJ1214b) and the early Earth.

Post-Doc
anson@uw.edu

Coming soon!

Post-Doc
danfm@uw.edu

I’m a Sagan Postdoctoral Fellow working on next generation astronomical data analysis. My main research interest is the application of probabilistic data analysis techniques to interesting datasets in astronomy. These days, I’m mostly working with Kepler data; everything from the raw pixel values to catalog level inferences. I’m also interested in the development of scientific software and open-source practices.

Post-Doc
irsic@uw.edu

I work on large-scale structure and evolution of the high-redshift intergalactic gas, and its implications on cosmology and the epoch of reionization. My main topic of study is the Lyman-alpha forest measurements and how to use them to constraint various cosmological and astrophysical parameters governing the intergalactic medium. I am working on several aspects of the Lyman-alpha forest, from data-analysis, using new measurements of the various statistics (both large data-sets and small high-resolution data), to large hydro-dynamical simulations of the intergalactic medium, to theoretical modeling.

Post-Doc
C313
206-543-9849
rubab@uw.edu

My primary research focus is massive star geriatrics: the study of the affects of old age on the most massive stars. I am particularly interested in understanding how episodic mass-loss in the last stages of stellar evolution influences the fate of the stars, circumstellar dust formation and chemical enrichment of galaxies. At UW I am developing crowded field photometry science cases and tools for the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) nearby galaxies guest observer investigation team (WINGS, GO-SIT).

Post-Doc
C333
206-543-6307
jrlomax@uw.edu

I work on the binarity and mass loss of massive stars, as well as the morphologies and colors of protoplanetary and debris disks. I primarily use polarimetry in conjunction with other observing and modeling techniques to form a comprehensive understanding of the behavior of these systems.

LSST Post-doc
C333
morriscb@

I currently work as a software and algorithm developer on the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope(LSST) as part of the Data Management, Alert Production team at UW. My main interests are in the field of cosmology specifically weak gravitational lensing and large-scale structure and using these measurements to constrain the dark sector of the Universe. I am also involved in the LSST Dark Energy Science Collaboration(DESC) developing methods to estimate galaxy redshifts from galaxy clustering statistics.

Post-Doc
mrawls@uw.edu

I work with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) Data Management group to develop software for Alert Production. I’m also a researcher in stellar astronomy with a focus on binary and variable stars.

Post-Doc
B349
206-221-7949
sakaricm@uw.edu

I determine the chemical abundances of stars, primarily ones in globular clusters and dwarf galaxies. I study distant clusters outside of the Milky Way through integrated light spectroscopy, where a single spectrum is obtained from an entire cluster. I use these abundances to study the assembly histories of their host galaxies, globular cluster evolution, and stellar evolution.

Research Associate
B330C
206-543-5280
gallegoj@uw.edu

My research focuses on star formation in nearby galaxies and its interplay with molecular gas. I’m very interested in the research of new techniques to calibrate star formation and in developing more accurate models of photodissociation in GMC. I’m also an active member of MaNGA and spend a fair amount of my time developing software for SDSS.

Post-doc
C308
206-221-1656
ctslater@uw.edu

I work on understanding interactions between the Milky Way and the population of dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. This includes observing the tidal debris left behind by dwarfs as they fall onto the Galaxy, along with modeling the changing properties of dwarfs as they become satellites of the Milky Way. Much of my work uses data from the Pan-STARRS survey. I am also the LSST Data Systems Fellow, and I support that project with analyses of the scientific requirements and expected  performance of the survey.

Graduates

Name
Position
Office
Phone
Email
Graduate Student
B323
hvbish@uw.edu

Interests: galaxy formation and evolution, baryon cycling in the CGM, star formation histories, the high-redshift universe, data science

Graduate Student
B325
ibutsky@uw.edu

My research focuses on using N-body simulations to study astronomical objects of varying scales, from proto-planetary disks to entire galaxies.

Graduate Student
B329
206-543-9039
ebyler@uw.edu

I am interested in stellar populations and extragalactic astronomy. I study nearby galaxies, using their constituent stars to understand their evolution as a whole.

Graduate student
B333
206-543-6276
deitrr@

My research lies in the intersection between orbital dynamics and climate to understand the possibilities for habitability of exoplanets about which we know very little.

Graduate Student
B325
tzdw@uw.edu

I am interested in massive star evolution, exotic massive binary systems, Thorne-Zytkow Objects and a range of other topics involving massive stars.

Graduate Student
B333
mdurbin@uw.edu

I’m interested in using resolved stars in nearby galaxies to learn about the evolution of galaxies as a whole.

Graduate Student
B323
dflemin3@uw.edu

My research focuses on simulating exoplanet systems to examine their dynamics and potential habitability.

Graduate Student
B317
206-543-4954
garofali@uw.edu

My research interests are in high-energy astronomy studying populations of objects like high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) and supernova remnants (SNRs).

Graduate Student
B337
eakruse@uw

I work with the Kepler data to discover and characterize new planets. Specifically, I am looking to find planets showing large transit timing variations (TTVs) that get missed by other pipelines. Using the TTVs, I hope to measure masses and densities of the most interesting (and rocky) Kepler planets.

Graduate Student
B323
mlazz@uw.edu

I am currently working on the ChandraPHAT team to characterize X-ray sources in Andromeda and find their optical counterparts, with the goal of discovering new X-ray binaries in our nearest galactic neighbor.

Graduate Student
B319
alinc@uw.edu

I am pursuing a dual-title Ph.D. in Astronomy & Astrobiology working with Professor Meadows on exoplanet atmospheres. Currently I am continuing development of the convection routines of a new 1D RCE climate model using the Virtual Planetary Laboratory‘s sophisticated SMART radiative transfer code. I am applying this model to the effect of carbon dioxide ice cloud condensation at the outer edge of the habitable zone and to Venus analog exoplanets. I am broadly interested in understanding planetary habitability through computational methods and their applications to predicting and characterizing observation.

Graduate Student
B333
rodluger at uw dot edu

I am fourth-year Astronomy/Astrobiology PhD student studying the habitability of extrasolar planets around the lowest-mass M dwarf stars. I am interested in several aspects of the evolution of planets in the habitable zone of M dwarfs, including tidal migration, early runaway greenhouses, and atmospheric escape.

Graduate Student
B335
lurie@uw.edu

I’m using time domain and large-area photometric surveys to understand the Milky Way’s stellar populations, from the magnetic activity of individual stars all the way to kiloparsec-scale substructures in the halo and disk.

Graduate Student
B319
jlustigy@

I’m interested in finding and characterizing habitable extrasolar planets. Currently, I’m developing an atmospheric retrieval code to analyze the spectra of terrestrial exoplanets in the habitable zones of their parent stars with the hopes of determining which planets may be suitable for, or inhabited by, life.

Graduate Student
B339
moeyensj@uw.edu

Joachim is interested in big data and software driven solutions to problems in astronomy. During his undergraduate studies at the University of Washington he was presented with the opportunity to work on a research project for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). This project focused on LSST’s photometric calibration in relation to its auxiliary telescope.  He is now working on LSST’s Moving Object Pipeline System (MOPS): the software designed to link millions of moving object detections into realistic and time-forward predictable orbits.

Graduate Student
B337
bmmorris@uw.edu

Characterizing exoplanets, their host stars, and life on Earth, while contributing to open source software.

Graduate Student
B341
206-543-5185
jruan@

I am broadly interested in multi-wavelength time-domain observations of accretion phenomenon, using large-scale imaging and spectroscopic surveys.

Graduate Student
B339
206-915-9093
suberlak@uw.edu

I am interested in phenomena related to Active Galactic Nuclei, including High-Energy Astrophysics, the physics of accretion disks, and black holes. My current research with Dr Ivezić involves studying the variability of  distant galaxies hosting an AGN – Quasars, using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, and the Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey data. Understanding the parameters of variability, and the accuracy of the Damped Random Walk model, serves as a useful tool of Physics at the accretion disk scales.

Graduate Student
B317
otelford@uw.edu

I’m interested in using large data sets to probe the physics driving the evolution of galaxies.

Graduate Student
B317
mjt29@astro.washington.edu

I use cosmological simulations to study the co-evolution of galaxies and supermassive black holes

Graduate Student
B329
206-543-9039
phoebe2@uw.edu

My research interests include theoretical high-redshift astrophysics, cosmology, and the intergalactic medium.

Graduate Student
B341
206-543-5185
scw7@uw.edu

Spencer Wallace is a first year graduate student in astronomy at the University of Washington. His interests include using computer simulations to study the formation of stars and galaxies in the early universe.

Graduate Student
B335
kweis@uw.edu

I’m interested in characterizing single and multiple star systems to better understand the evolution of our Galaxy and its stellar and planetary constituents.

Graduate Student
B335
210-710-9303
mwilde@uw.edu

Coming soon.

Graduate Student
B329
206-543-9039
windemut@uw.edu

My current research involves modeling Kepler eclipsing binaries and using inferred stellar and orbital properties to optimize the search for transiting circumbinary planets.

Staff

Name
Position
Office
Phone
Email
Academic Counselor
C337
206-543-9590
cedgar@uw.edu

Coming soon!

ARC Business Manager
B330E
206-685-7857
evansm@uw.edu

Mike (BS and MS Engineering, UW ’76 & ’78) joined the UW in 1992 as a Research Coordinator to help finish the Astrophysical Research Consortium (ARC) 3.5m telescope, start construction of the 2.5m Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) telescope and the associated infrastructure, and manage the contracts and finances of ARC and the SDSS Collaboration. In 1998 Mike became the ARC Business Manager and remains in that position.

Fiscal Specialist
C319
206-543-1453
crabbj@uw.edu

Coming soon!

Fiscal Specialist
C319
206-543-6287
bokano@uw.edu

Coming soon!

ARC Accountant / CPA
B330D
206-616-0035
alimyp@uw.edu

Alim joined the UW in 2014 as an accountant for the projects that the Astrophysical Research Consortium (ARC) manages. She holds a current Certified Public Accountant license issued by the Washington State Board of Accountancy.

Program Assistant
C319
206-685-2150
tvaldez1@uw.edu

I graduated from UW in 2012 with a BA in International Studies of SE Asia and Intercultural Communications. I started working at UW in May 2016.  I enjoy traveling, painting, reading, and taking naps.

Department Administrator
C319A
206-221-7295
stan@

Coming soon!