Graduates

You can find information about our graduate students below. Click on a name to go to an individual’s profile page.

Note: email addresses are @astro.washington.edu unless otherwise specified.

Name
Position
Office
Phone
Email
Graduate Student
B323
hvbish@uw.edu

Interests: galaxy formation and evolution, baryon cycling in the CGM, star formation histories, the high-redshift universe, data science

Graduate Student
B325
ibutsky@uw.edu

My research focuses on using N-body simulations to study astronomical objects of varying scales, from proto-planetary disks to entire galaxies.

Graduate Student
B329
206-543-9039
ebyler@uw.edu

I am interested in stellar populations and extragalactic astronomy. I study nearby galaxies, using their constituent stars to understand their evolution as a whole.

Graduate student
B333
206-543-6276
deitrr@

My research lies in the intersection between orbital dynamics and climate to understand the possibilities for habitability of exoplanets about which we know very little.

Graduate Student
B325
tzdw@uw.edu

I am interested in massive star evolution, exotic massive binary systems, Thorne-Zytkow Objects and a range of other topics involving massive stars.

Graduate Student
B333
mdurbin@uw.edu

I’m interested in using resolved stars in nearby galaxies to learn about the evolution of galaxies as a whole.

Graduate Student
B323
dflemin3@uw.edu

My research focuses on simulating exoplanet systems to examine their dynamics and potential habitability.

Graduate Student
B317
206-543-4954
garofali@uw.edu

My research interests are in high-energy astronomy studying populations of objects like high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) and supernova remnants (SNRs).

Graduate Student
B337
eakruse@uw

I work with the Kepler data to discover and characterize new planets. Specifically, I am looking to find planets showing large transit timing variations (TTVs) that get missed by other pipelines. Using the TTVs, I hope to measure masses and densities of the most interesting (and rocky) Kepler planets.

Graduate Student
B323
mlazz@uw.edu

I am currently working on the ChandraPHAT team to characterize X-ray sources in Andromeda and find their optical counterparts, with the goal of discovering new X-ray binaries in our nearest galactic neighbor.

Graduate Student
B319
alinc@uw.edu

I am pursuing a dual-title Ph.D. in Astronomy & Astrobiology working with Professor Meadows on exoplanet atmospheres. Currently I am continuing development of the convection routines of a new 1D RCE climate model using the Virtual Planetary Laboratory‘s sophisticated SMART radiative transfer code. I am applying this model to the effect of carbon dioxide ice cloud condensation at the outer edge of the habitable zone and to Venus analog exoplanets. I am broadly interested in understanding planetary habitability through computational methods and their applications to predicting and characterizing observation.

Graduate Student
B333
rodluger at uw dot edu

I am fourth-year Astronomy/Astrobiology PhD student studying the habitability of extrasolar planets around the lowest-mass M dwarf stars. I am interested in several aspects of the evolution of planets in the habitable zone of M dwarfs, including tidal migration, early runaway greenhouses, and atmospheric escape.

Graduate Student
B335
lurie@uw.edu

I’m using time domain and large-area photometric surveys to understand the Milky Way’s stellar populations, from the magnetic activity of individual stars all the way to kiloparsec-scale substructures in the halo and disk.

Graduate Student
B319
jlustigy@

I’m interested in finding and characterizing habitable extrasolar planets. Currently, I’m developing an atmospheric retrieval code to analyze the spectra of terrestrial exoplanets in the habitable zones of their parent stars with the hopes of determining which planets may be suitable for, or inhabited by, life.

Graduate Student
B339
moeyensj@uw.edu

Joachim is interested in big data and software driven solutions to problems in astronomy. During his undergraduate studies at the University of Washington he was presented with the opportunity to work on a research project for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). This project focused on LSST’s photometric calibration in relation to its auxiliary telescope.  He is now working on LSST’s Moving Object Pipeline System (MOPS): the software designed to link millions of moving object detections into realistic and time-forward predictable orbits.

Graduate Student
B337
bmmorris@uw.edu

Characterizing exoplanets, their host stars, and life on Earth, while contributing to open source software.

Graduate Student
B341
206-543-5185
jruan@

I am broadly interested in multi-wavelength time-domain observations of accretion phenomenon, using large-scale imaging and spectroscopic surveys.

Graduate Student
B339
206-915-9093
suberlak@uw.edu

I am interested in phenomena related to Active Galactic Nuclei, including High-Energy Astrophysics, the physics of accretion disks, and black holes. My current research with Dr Ivezić involves studying the variability of  distant galaxies hosting an AGN – Quasars, using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, and the Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey data. Understanding the parameters of variability, and the accuracy of the Damped Random Walk model, serves as a useful tool of Physics at the accretion disk scales.

Graduate Student
B317
otelford@uw.edu

I’m interested in using large data sets to probe the physics driving the evolution of galaxies.

Graduate Student
B317
mjt29@astro.washington.edu

I use cosmological simulations to study the co-evolution of galaxies and supermassive black holes

Graduate Student
B329
206-543-9039
phoebe2@uw.edu

My research interests include theoretical high-redshift astrophysics, cosmology, and the intergalactic medium.

Graduate Student
B341
206-543-5185
scw7@uw.edu

Spencer Wallace is a first year graduate student in astronomy at the University of Washington. His interests include using computer simulations to study the formation of stars and galaxies in the early universe.

Graduate Student
B335
kweis@uw.edu

I’m interested in characterizing single and multiple star systems to better understand the evolution of our Galaxy and its stellar and planetary constituents.

Graduate Student
B335
210-710-9303
mwilde@uw.edu

Coming soon.

Graduate Student
B329
206-543-9039
windemut@uw.edu

My current research involves modeling Kepler eclipsing binaries and using inferred stellar and orbital properties to optimize the search for transiting circumbinary planets.