Graduates

You can find information about our graduate students below. Click on a name to go to an individual’s profile page.

Note: email addresses are @astro.washington.edu unless otherwise specified.

Name
Position
Office
Phone
Email
Graduate Student
B325
206-708-9572
dinob@uw.edu

Dino Bektešević researches how to do image analysis in big data settings. Currently, he is working on porting LSST image processing pipeline to Spark and executing it on AWS with hopes that the entire LSST stack can eventually be run in cloud by using a distributed, shared-nothing Big Data management system and Cloud service from the University of Washington called Myria. He is also involved in a group developing a new shift-and-stack moving object detection algorithm for astronomical images called KBMoD where he is a part of the group testing the algorithm on DECam images. His pet project and special interest is the extraction of long linear features that can be attributed to meteors for which he developed a linear…

Graduate Student
B323
hvbish@uw.edu

Interests: galaxy formation and evolution, baryon cycling in the CGM, star formation histories, the high-redshift universe, data science

Graduate Student
B325
ibutsky@uw.edu

Hi! I’m a third-year graduate student working on galaxy-scale simulations with Tom Quinn.  My research interests include (but are not limited to) improving cosmic ray transport, galactic magnetism, galactic outflows, the circumgalactic medium, and galaxy clusters.

Graduate Student
B329
206-543-9039
ebyler@uw.edu

I am interested in stellar populations and extragalactic astronomy. I study nearby galaxies, using their constituent stars to understand their evolution as a whole.

Graduate student
B333
206-543-6276
deitrr@

My research lies in the intersection between orbital dynamics and climate to understand the possibilities for habitability of exoplanets about which we know very little.

Graduate Student
B341
tzdw@uw.edu

I am a third-year graduate student interested in many aspects of stellar evolution. In particular, I utilize cutting-edge stellar evolution models to craft simple observational tests of the importance of binarity in massive stellar evolution. I also like hunting for rare and strange objects like Thorne-Zytkow Objects and Red Supergiant X-ray Binaries, and massive stars pretending to be other things (often finding things pretending to be massive stars). Outside of graduate school, I help organize Astronomy On Tap SEA, play drums and percussion in Night Lunch, and bake cookies.

Graduate Student
B333
mdurbin@uw.edu

I’m interested in using resolved stars in nearby galaxies to learn about the evolution of galaxies as a whole. Right now my primary project involves identifying and characterizing populations of stars that exhibit anomalous Hα emission such as Be stars and symbiotics. I also work on predicting the upcoming space telescope WFIRST’s ability to recover ages and metallicities of resolved halo populations in the Local Volume.

Graduate Student
B323
dflemin3@uw.edu

My research focuses on simulating exoplanet systems to examine their dynamics and potential habitability.

Graduate Student
B317
206-543-4954
garofali@uw.edu

My research interests are in high-energy astronomy studying populations of objects like high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) and supernova remnants (SNRs).

Graduate Student
B319
tagordon@uw.edu

I’m working towards a Dual-Title PhD in Astronomy and Astrobiology. My research interests are detection and characterization of exoplanets. I’m currently working with Professor Eric Agol to investigate prospects for detecting exomoons using the James Webb Space Telescope.

Graduate Student
B337
eakruse@uw

I work with the Kepler data to discover and characterize new planets. Specifically, I am looking to find planets showing large transit timing variations (TTVs) that get missed by other pipelines. Using the TTVs, I hope to measure masses and densities of the most interesting (and rocky) Kepler planets.

Graduate Student
B323
mlazz@uw.edu

I study X-ray sources using multi-wavelength datasets. I am currently using data from NuSTAR, Chandra, and Hubble to study the X-ray binary population in M31. Using data from near infrared through hard X-ray wavelengths allows me to characterize the compact object, its stellar companion, and to understand HMXB systems in the context of the surrounding stellar population.

Graduate Student
B319
alinc@uw.edu

I am pursuing a dual-title Ph.D. in Astronomy & Astrobiology working with Professor Meadows on modeling exoplanet atmospheres. I continue development of a new 1D RCE climate model using the Virtual Planetary Laboratory‘s sophisticated SMART radiative transfer code. I primarily work on developing the convective routines, which include heat fluxes in unstable and stable atmospheres, phase changes, and cloud formation. I have been awarded a NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship to implement a day/night heat transport structure and couple this model with the versatile KINETICS photochemistry code. These tools are used to model a variety of small planet atmospheres (particularly around M dwarfs) that may be very alien compared to Solar System planets. These models are also used to to…

Graduate Student
B335
lurie@uw.edu

I’m using time domain and large-area photometric surveys to understand the Milky Way’s stellar populations, from the magnetic activity of individual stars all the way to kiloparsec-scale substructures in the halo and disk.

Graduate Student
B319
jlustigy@

I’m interested in finding and characterizing habitable extrasolar planets. Currently, I’m developing an atmospheric retrieval code to analyze the spectra of terrestrial exoplanets in the habitable zones of their parent stars with the hopes of determining which planets may be suitable for, or inhabited by, life.

Graduate Student
B339
moeyensj@uw.edu

Joachim is interested in big data and software driven solutions to problems in astronomy. During his undergraduate studies at the University of Washington he was presented with the opportunity to work on a research project for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). This project focused on LSST’s photometric calibration in relation to its auxiliary telescope.  He is now working on LSST’s Moving Object Pipeline System (MOPS): the software designed to link millions of moving object detections into realistic and time-forward predictable orbits.

Graduate Student
B337
bmmorris@uw.edu

Characterizing exoplanets, their host stars, and life on Earth, while contributing to open source software.

Graduate Student
B317
kneugent@uw.edu

I study the evolution of massive stars including main-sequence OB stars, yellow supergiants, red supergiants and Wolf-Rayet stars.

Graduate Student
B337
sanchenn@uw.edu

I study “genetically modified” Milky Way galaxy simulations to understand the evolution of the circumgalactic medium.

Graduate Student
B339
206-915-9093
suberlak@uw.edu

I am interested in phenomena related to Active Galactic Nuclei, including High-Energy Astrophysics, the physics of accretion disks, and black holes. My current research with Dr Ivezić involves studying the variability of  distant galaxies hosting an AGN – Quasars, using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, and the Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey data. Understanding the parameters of variability, and the accuracy of the Damped Random Walk model, serves as a useful tool of Physics at the accretion disk scales.

Graduate Student
B317
otelford@uw.edu

I’m interested in using large data sets to probe the physics driving the evolution of galaxies.

Graduate Student
B333
bt717@uw.edu

My current research involves using observations to better understand the Epoch of Reionization. I am also very interested in the study of data science.

Graduate Student
B333
tovarg@uw.edu

I am a first year graduate student pursuing a dual-title Ph.D in Astronomy & Astrobiology. I am interested in the detection and characterization of habitable exoplanets.

Graduate Student
B329
206-543-9039
phoebe2@uw.edu

My research interests include theoretical high-redshift astrophysics, cosmology, and the intergalactic medium.

Graduate Student
B341
206-543-5185
scw7@uw.edu

Spencer Wallace is a first year graduate student in astronomy at the University of Washington. His interests include using computer simulations to study the formation of stars and galaxies in the early universe.

Graduate Student
B335
210-710-9303
mwilde@uw.edu

Coming soon.

Graduate Student
B329
206-543-9039
windemut@uw.edu

My current research involves modeling Kepler eclipsing binaries and using inferred stellar and orbital properties to optimize the search for transiting circumbinary planets.