Graduates

You can find information about our graduate students below. Click on a name to go to an individual’s profile page.

Note: email addresses are @astro.washington.edu unless otherwise specified.

Name
Position
Office
Phone
Email
Graduate Student
B325
206-708-9572
dinob@uw.edu

Dino Bektešević researches how to do image analysis in big data settings. Currently, he is working on porting LSST image processing pipeline to Spark and executing it on AWS with hopes that the entire LSST stack can eventually be run in cloud by using a distributed, shared-nothing Big Data management system and Cloud service from the University of Washington called Myria. He is also involved in a group developing a new shift-and-stack moving object detection algorithm for astronomical images called KBMoD where he is a part of the group testing the algorithm on DECam images. His pet project and special interest is the extraction of long linear features that can be attributed to meteors for which he developed a linear…

Graduate Student
B323
hvbish@uw.edu

I study the circumgalactic medium and the role it plays in star formation/galaxy evolution via the ‘galactic fountain’. My current work involves analyzing line-of-sight gas absorption in spectra of blue horizontal branch stars to place constraints on the kinematics of baryon cycling in the Milky Way’s halo. Some of my other research interests include: the high-redshift universe, galactic archaeology, data science & visualization

Graduate Student
B325
ibutsky@uw.edu

Hi! I’m a third-year graduate student working on galaxy-scale simulations with Tom Quinn.  My research interests include (but are not limited to) improving cosmic ray transport, galactic magnetism, galactic outflows, the circumgalactic medium, and galaxy clusters.

Graduate Student
B345
mcurr@uw.edu

I am a first-year graduate student in astronomy and astrobiology working with Vikki Meadows. My research interests include using high-resolution spectroscopy and atmospheric modeling to understand and characterize exoplanet atmospheres.

PhD Candidate
B341
tzdw@uw.edu

I am a fourth-year graduate student interested in massive stars, stellar evolution, stellar populations, and data science. I use Gaia and WISE data to characterize the variability of luminous stars, cutting edge stellar evolution models to diagnose populations with unresolved binaries, and high-resolution spectra to study interesting single objects. Outside of graduate school, I help organize Astronomy On Tap SEA, play drums and percussion in Night Lunch, and bake cookies.

Graduate Student
B333
mdurbin@uw.edu

I work at the intersection of distance scales and stellar populations. My current project is focused on calibrating the behavior of the tip of the red giant branch in the near-infrared, and I have previously worked on emission line stars, RR Lyrae period-luminosity-metallicity relations, and instrumentation for the Wide-Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Telescope. I am also part of UW’s Science, Technology, and Society Studies certificate program.

Graduate Student
B323
dflemin3@uw.edu

My research focuses on simulating exoplanet systems to examine their dynamics and potential habitability.

Graduate Student
B317
lfulmer@uw.edu

My research involves using unsupervised classification techniques to reveal strange and potentially unforeseen objects among time series data. I work closely withe Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF) Collaboration and the Dirac Institute, exploring the intersection between Astronomy and Data Science.

Graduate Student
B329
rodolfog@uw.edu

I am interested in a diverse range of exoplanet environments and their impacts on the potential for habitability. Currently, my research involves studying the evolution of exoplanetary atmospheres and interiors using the VPLANET software suite.

Graduate Student
B319
tagordon@uw.edu

I’m working towards a Dual-Title PhD in Astronomy and Astrobiology. My research interests are detection and characterization of exoplanets. I’m currently working with Professor Eric Agol to investigate prospects for detecting exomoons using the James Webb Space Telescope.

Graduate Student
B323
mlazz@uw.edu

I’m an observational astronomer specializing in X-ray binaries in nearby galaxies. My research interests include the formation and evolution of X-ray binary systems, the relationship between X-ray binaries and their local stellar populations, and X-ray instrumentation effects on X-ray spectra. I am currently working towards a PhD in Astronomy at the University of Washington in Seattle, WA. My advisor at UW is Dr. Benjamin Williams. I also work with Dr. Ann Hornschemeier at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and Dr. Daniela Huppenkothen at UW.

Graduate Student
B319
alinc@uw.edu

I am pursuing a dual-title Ph.D. in Astronomy & Astrobiology working with Professor Meadows on modeling exoplanet atmospheres. I continue development of a new 1D RCE climate model using the Virtual Planetary Laboratory‘s sophisticated SMART radiative transfer code. I primarily work on developing the convective routines, which include heat fluxes in unstable and stable atmospheres, phase changes, and cloud formation. I have been awarded a NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship to implement a day/night heat transport structure and couple this model with the versatile KINETICS photochemistry code. These tools are used to model a variety of small planet atmospheres (particularly around M dwarfs) that may be very alien compared to Solar System planets. These models are also used to to…

Graduate Student
B317
blindor@uw.edu

My research interests include exoplanetary detection and characterization as wells as the formation and evolution of galaxies.

Graduate Student
B319
jlustigy@

I’m interested in finding and characterizing habitable extrasolar planets. Currently, I’m developing an atmospheric retrieval code to analyze the spectra of terrestrial exoplanets in the habitable zones of their parent stars with the hopes of determining which planets may be suitable for, or inhabited by, life.

Graduate Student
B335
mmckay18@uw.edu

I am a first-year graduate student working on star-formation and instrumentation. My research interest includes using imaging and spectroscopy to understand the formation and evolution of galaxies.

Graduate Student
B339
moeyensj@uw.edu

Joachim is interested in big data and software driven solutions to problems in astronomy. During his undergraduate studies at the University of Washington he was presented with the opportunity to work on a research project for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). This project focused on LSST’s photometric calibration in relation to its auxiliary telescope.  He is now working on LSST’s Moving Object Pipeline System (MOPS): the software designed to link millions of moving object detections into realistic and time-forward predictable orbits.

Graduate Student
B337
bmmorris@uw.edu

Characterizing exoplanets, their host stars, and life on Earth, while contributing to open source software.

Graduate Student
B317
kneugent@uw.edu

I study the evolution of massive stars including main-sequence OB stars, yellow supergiants, red supergiants and Wolf-Rayet stars.

Graduate Student
B337
sanchenn@uw.edu

I study “genetically modified” Milky Way galaxy simulations to understand the evolution of the circumgalactic medium.

Graduate Student
B330A
206-685-8762
csayres

I am a software engineer for Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Apache Point Observatory, and Las Campanas Observatory.  I’m involved in a variety of projects with a focus on telescope and instrument control, and user interfaces.  When I’m off-campus, I try to end up in the mountains aiming a pair of skis, a kayak, a mountain bike, or a telescope (trying very hard not crash).

Graduate Student
smotherh@uw.edu

My research interests lie in exoplanetary habitability and Outer Solar System object detection. For exoplanets, I study the impact of orbital dynamics on the habitability of exoplanetary systems using a multiphysics software suite called VPLANET. For the Outer Solar System, I work on trying to detect objects below the single-frame noise floor using a “shift-and-stack” pipeline called KBMOD.

Graduate Student
B335
stevengs@uw.edu

I am a first year graduate student interested in the intersection of astronomy and data science. At UW, I am working with Mario Juric on enabling distributed analysis of astronomical data sets in the Cloud.

Graduate Student
B339
206-915-9093
suberlak@uw.edu

I am interested in phenomena related to Active Galactic Nuclei, including High-Energy Astrophysics, the physics of accretion disks, and black holes. My current research with Dr Ivezić involves studying the variability of  distant galaxies hosting an AGN – Quasars, using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, and the Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey data. Understanding the parameters of variability, and the accuracy of the Damped Random Walk model, serves as a useful tool of Physics at the accretion disk scales.

Graduate Student
B329
otelford@uw.edu

I use large data sets to probe the physics driving the evolution of galaxies.

Graduate Student
B333
bt717@uw.edu

My current research involves measuring the extents and morphologies of Lyman-alpha halos around galaxies. I am also very interested in the study of data science.

Graduate Student
B333
tovarg@uw.edu

I am a first year graduate student pursuing a dual-title Ph.D in Astronomy & Astrobiology. I am interested in the detection and characterization of habitable exoplanets.

Graduate Student
B337
detran@uw.edu

I’m currently working on the retrofit of KOSMOS, an optical multi-object spectrograph with long slit capabilities, for its new home at Apache Point Observatory (APO), as well as the design of the new spectrograph for APO.

Graduate Student
B341
206-543-5185
scw7@uw.edu

Spencer Wallace is a graduate student in astronomy at the University of Washington. He uses the N-body code ChaNGa to study the conditions for planet formation around low mass stars.

Graduate Student
B335
210-710-9303
mwilde@uw.edu

Coming soon.

Graduate Student
B329
206-543-9039
windemut@uw.edu

My current research involves modeling Kepler eclipsing binaries and using inferred stellar and orbital properties to optimize the search for transiting circumbinary planets.