Graduates

You can find information about our graduate students below. Click on a name to go to an individual’s profile page.

Note: email addresses are @astro.washington.edu unless otherwise specified.

Name
Position
Office
Phone
Email
Graduate Student
B325
(206) 773-8440
dinob@uw.edu

A big fan of coding and physics, Dino earned a masters in Computational Physics at Faculty of Science Split, Croatia, on the topic of linear feature detection in astronomical images. Having re-analyzed the entire Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) ~16TB large image dataset he discovered his passion for Big Data and related image analysis problems. As a graduate student at University of Washington, Dino works on Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) Data Management code, adding suport for cloud services and executing Science Pipelines in the cloud. To various different extent he is also involved in other projects such as image differencing, kernel based moving object detection (KBMOD) and deblending.  

Graduate Student
B317
jbirky@uw.edu

I am a first year graduate student generally interested in stars, stellar populations, and Galactic archaeology using large scale surveys.

Graduate Student
B323
hvbish@uw.edu

I study the circumgalactic medium and the role it plays in star formation/galaxy evolution via the ‘galactic fountain’. My current work involves analyzing line-of-sight gas absorption in spectra of quasars and blue horizontal branch stars (BHBs) to place constraints on the kinematics of baryon cycling in the Milky Way’s halo. Some of my other research interests: data science & visualization, galactic archaeology, the high-redshift universe

Graduate Student
B325
ibutsky@uw.edu

Hi! I’m a fourth-year graduate student working on galaxy simulations with Tom Quinn and Jessica Werk.  My research interests include (but are not limited to) improving models of cosmic-ray transport, synthetic spectroscopy, galactic magnetism, galactic outflows, the circumgalactic medium, and galaxy clusters.  In my free time, I like to be outside either running, climbing, or snowboarding!

Graduate Student
B345
mcurr@uw.edu

I am a second-year graduate student in astronomy and astrobiology working with Vikki Meadows. My research interests include using high-resolution spectroscopy and atmospheric modeling to understand and characterize exoplanet atmospheres.

Graduate Student
B319
demasi@uw.edu

I am a graduate student, studying neutron stars with Professor Scott Anderson. It’s seriously very cool.

PhD Candidate
B341
tzdw@uw.edu

Trevor is a sixth year graduate student. He grew up in Los Angeles, before moving to Middletown, CT to start his undergraduate degree in Physics and Astronomy at Wesleyan University. While at Wesleyan, Trevor fell in love with all things stellar. He graduated with from Wesleyan in 2015 with high honors in Astronomy, before moving to Seattle to begin his graduate studies at UW. His research there focuses on leveraging new techniques to study massive stars.

Graduate Student
B333
mdurbin@uw.edu

I work at the intersection of distance scales and stellar populations. My current project is focused on calibrating the behavior of the tip of the red giant branch in the near-infrared, and I have previously worked on emission line stars, RR Lyrae period-luminosity-metallicity relations, and instrumentation for the Wide-Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Telescope. I am also part of UW’s Science, Technology, and Society Studies certificate program.

Graduate Student
B323
dflemin3@uw.edu

My research focuses on simulating exoplanet systems to examine their dynamics and potential habitability.

Graduate Student
B317
lfulmer@uw.edu

My research involves using unsupervised classification techniques to reveal strange and potentially unforeseen objects among time series data. I work closely with the Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF) Collaboration and the Dirac Institute, exploring the intersection between Astronomy and Data Science.

Graduate Student
B329
rodolfog@uw.edu

I am interested in the possible diverse ranges of exoplanet environments and their impacts on the potential for habitability. To determine the potential habitability of exoplanets, I simulate atmosphere-interior interactions using the VPLanet software suite to predict atmospheric compositions and the possible presence of liquid water.

Graduate Student
B337
samroseg@uw.edu

I am a first year graduate student studying exoplanet atmospheres with Prof. Vikki Meadows. I use a 1-D climate model combined with atmospheric retrieval models in order to predict our ability to interpret exoplanet biosignatures with future instruments.

Graduate Student
B319
tagordon@uw.edu

I’m working towards a Dual-Title PhD in Astronomy and Astrobiology. My research interests are detection and characterization of exoplanets. I’m currently working with Professor Eric Agol to investigate prospects for detecting exomoons using the James Webb Space Telescope.

Graduate Student
B323
mlazz@uw.edu

I am a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Washington. I use multi-wavelength observations to characterize the X-ray binary populations in nearby galaxies. I have used observations from Chandra, NuSTAR, HST, and Swift to study the high mass X-ray binary populations in M31, M33, and the Small Magellanic Cloud. I am interested in massive binary stellar evolution, high energy astrophysics in general, multi-wavelength analysis methods, X-ray binary formation and evolution, compact binaries, multi-messenger astronomy, and comparing observations with theoretical predictions from binary population synthesis models. My advisor at the University of Washington is Dr. Benjamin Williams. I have spent several summers during graduate school working with Dr. Ann Hornschemeier’s X-ray galaxies group at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. I grew…

Graduate Student
B319
alinc@uw.edu

I am pursuing a dual-title Ph.D. in Astronomy & Astrobiology working with Professor Meadows on modeling exoplanet atmospheres. I continue development of a new 1D RCE climate model using the Virtual Planetary Laboratory‘s sophisticated SMART radiative transfer code. I primarily work on developing the convective routines, which include heat fluxes in unstable and stable atmospheres, phase changes, and cloud formation. I have been awarded a NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship to implement a day/night heat transport structure and couple this model with the versatile KINETICS photochemistry code. These tools are used to model a variety of small planet atmospheres (particularly around M dwarfs) that may be very alien compared to Solar System planets. These models are also used to to…

Graduate Student
B317
blindor@uw.edu

Generally interested in exoplanets, galactic astronomy, and astro-informatics. Currently working on a project with Eric Agol to derive and constrain planetary system parameters by modeling transit timing variations.

Graduate Student
B319
jlustigy@

I’m interested in finding and characterizing habitable extrasolar planets. Currently, I’m developing an atmospheric retrieval code to analyze the spectra of terrestrial exoplanets in the habitable zones of their parent stars with the hopes of determining which planets may be suitable for, or inhabited by, life.

Graduate Student
B335
mmckay18@uw.edu

I am a first-year graduate student working on star-formation and instrumentation. My research interest includes using imaging and spectroscopy to understand the formation and evolution of galaxies.

Graduate Student
B339
moeyensj@uw.edu

Joachim is interested in big data and software driven solutions to problems in astronomy. During his undergraduate studies at the University of Washington he was presented with the opportunity to work on a research project for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). This project focused on LSST’s photometric calibration in relation to its auxiliary telescope.  He is now working on LSST’s Moving Object Pipeline System (MOPS): the software designed to link millions of moving object detections into realistic and time-forward predictable orbits.

Graduate Student
B317
kneugent@uw.edu

I study the evolution of massive stars including main-sequence OB stars, yellow supergiants, red supergiants and Wolf-Rayet stars.

Graduate Student
B337
sanchenn@uw.edu

Natalie “Nicole” Sanchez is a rising fifth year graduate student in the Astronomy Department. She is a member of the UW Nbody Shop and uses cosmological simulations of galaxies to better understand galactic evolution. With her advisor, Dr. Jessica Werk, Nicole focuses on researching the circumgalactic medium (CGM). She is particularly interested in understanding the mechanisms which drive the metal enrichment of the CGM, especially the effects of supermassive black holes. Nicole has recently published her second first-author paper, and is excited for what the future of her work may hold.

Graduate Student
B330A
206-685-8762
csayres

I am a software engineer for Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Apache Point Observatory, and Las Campanas Observatory.  I’m involved in a variety of projects with a focus on telescope and instrument control, and user interfaces.  When I’m off-campus, I try to end up in the mountains aiming a pair of skis, a kayak, a mountain bike, or a telescope (trying very hard not crash).

Graduate Student
smotherh@uw.edu

My research interests lie in exoplanetary habitability and Outer Solar System object detection. For exoplanets, I study the impact of orbital dynamics on the habitability of exoplanetary systems using a multiphysics software suite called VPLANET. For the Outer Solar System, I work on trying to detect objects below the single-frame noise floor using a “shift-and-stack” pipeline called KBMOD.

Graduate Student
B335
stevengs@uw.edu

I am a first year graduate student interested in the intersection of astronomy and data science. At UW, I am working with Mario Juric on enabling distributed analysis of astronomical data sets in the Cloud.

Graduate Student
B333
bt717@uw.edu

My current research involves measuring the extents and morphologies of Lyman-alpha halos around galaxies. I am also very interested in the study of data science.

Graduate Student
B333
tovarg@uw.edu

I am pursuing a dual-title Ph.D in Astronomy & Astrobiology. I am interested in the detection and characterization of habitable exoplanets.

Graduate Student
B337
detran@uw.edu

I’m currently working on the retrofit of KOSMOS, an optical multi-object spectrograph with long slit capabilities, for its new home at Apache Point Observatory (APO), as well as the design of the new spectrograph for APO.

Graduate Student
B341
206-543-5185
scw7@uw.edu

I use N-body simulations to study the formation of terrestrial planets. In particular, I’m interested in how this process plays out around M stars, which put out huge amounts of radiation during the pre main-sequence phase and are known to host extremely short period worlds.

Graduate Student
B335
mwilde@uw.edu

Research My research is focused on the gas that surrounds galaxies, the so-called circumgalactic medium (CGM). The CGM is responsible for fueling star formation and thus galaxy evolution over cosmic time, but its physics are dominated by the complex interplay of gas accreting onto the galaxy balanced by feedback from exploding stars in the galaxy. I am constructing a large spectroscopic database that will require the use of statistical and machine learning methods to tease out the complex gas physics taking place in the CGM. I am also an IGERT fellow at UW working with the eScience Institute.  

Graduate Student
B329
206-543-9039
windemut@uw.edu

My current research involves modeling Kepler eclipsing binaries and using inferred stellar and orbital properties to optimize the search for transiting circumbinary planets.