• Fabric releases anti-HIV drug
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    Huffington Post: Dissolvable “tampon” could quickly deliver anti-HIV drug

Huffington Post: Dissolvable “tampon” could quickly deliver anti-HIV drug

Anti-HIV materials being developed by the Woodrow group could be integrated into a dissolvable, “tampon”-like product that is both easy for women to use and also effective, reports the Huffington Post.

  • UW Bioengineering assistant professor Kim Woodrow leads Gates Foundation youth outreach event
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    Kim Woodrow leads Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation youth outreach event

Kim Woodrow leads Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation youth outreach event

UW Bioengineering Assistant Professor Dr. Kim Woodrow led a Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation youth educational outreach event on July 23, which exposed 6th to 8th graders to a college campus and laboratory and led participants in inquiry-based learning activities about STEM applications for pediatric HIV.

  • Fabric releases anti-HIV drug
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    Dissolving fabric may offer fast, potent anti-HIV protection

Dissolving fabric may offer fast, potent anti-HIV protection

Bioengineers in Dr. Woodrow’s lab have discovered a faster way to deliver a topical drug that can protect women from contracting HIV. The researchers created a fiber material embedded with the drug through a process called electrospinning that quickly dissolves and releases a potent antiretroviral drug, maraviroc, when it comes into contact with moisture.

  • UW Bioengineering Associate Professor Dr. Dan Ratner leads activity on ultrasound
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    UW Bioengineering Summer Camp 2014 concludes, teaches high school students about bioengineering, global health

UW Bioengineering Summer Camp 2014 concludes, teaches high school students about bioengineering, global health

UW Bioengineering Summer Camp 2014 wraps up, teaching 24 high school students about the field of bioengineering and and the field’s solutions for global health problems.

  • Image of protein structure binding to folding amyloid protein
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    New protein structure could help treat Alzheimer’s, related diseases

New protein structure could help treat Alzheimer’s, related diseases

UW Bioengineering Professor Dr. Valerie Daggett and research team members have designed a peptide structure that can stop harmful changes of proteins in the body that are linked to diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and Lou Gehrig’s disease (ALS).

  • UW Bioengineering faculty Michael Regnier and Charles Murry
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    Michael Regnier, Charles Murry named 2014 UW Presidential Entrepreneurial Faculty Fellows

Michael Regnier, Charles Murry named 2014 UW Presidential Entrepreneurial Faculty Fellows

UW Bioengineering faculty Charles Murry (joint professor of pathology, bioengineering and medicine/cardiology) and Michael Regnier, as well as adjunct faculty Michael Jensen, MD, director of the Ben Towne Center for Childhood Cancer at Seattle Children’s Research Institute and professor of pediatric hematology-oncology at UW Medicine and Satoshi Minoshima, professor of radiology, were named 2014 UW Presidential Entrepreneurial Faculty Fellows.

  • David C. Auth at 2014 Bioengineering Departmental Graduation Ceremony
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    Class of 2014 celebrates, David C. Auth delivers keynote speech, at Bioengineering Departmental Graduation Ceremony

Class of 2014 celebrates, David C. Auth delivers keynote speech, at Bioengineering Departmental Graduation Ceremony

The UW Bioengineering Class of 2014 celebrated their impressive accomplishments, David C. Auth delivered keynote speech, at the 2014 Bioengineering Departmental Graduation Ceremony.

Spring 2014 UW Bioengineering eNews

In this issue:  Chair’s Letter – Note to Graduates – Features – News Briefs – In the Media – Events Dear Alumni and Friends, With a sense of pride, we […]

Electrospun fibers show promise for rapid HIV prevention

UW Bioengineering Ph.D. student, Cameron Ball, and Assistant Professor Kim Woodrow, demonstrate the potential of a new type of product that may help women protect themselves against sexual HIV transmission. Their research, published online ahead of print in the journal Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (AAC) of the American Society for Microbiology, shows the ability of water-soluble electrospun fiber material to rapidly release maraviroc, an antiretroviral drug. The researchers suggest that their material offers advantages over other anti-HIV microbicides currently in development.

19th UWEB21 Biomaterials Intensive Short Course

Biomaterials: The Platform Technology of Medical Devices. A 2.5 day introduction to biomaterials, medical devices and biocompatibility presented by the experts. August 14 to August 16, 2014.