Core Faculty

  • Yager_P_50
    Permalink Gallery

    Paul Yager, Leslie Chan and Christopher Adams receive 2015 College of Engineering Awards

Paul Yager, Leslie Chan and Christopher Adams receive 2015 College of Engineering Awards

W Bioengineering Professor Paul Yager, Ph.D. candidate Leslie Chan and Molecular Engineering and Sciences Institute building coordinator Christopher Adams have been selected for 2015 College of Engineering (COE) Awards.

  • Image from a healthy skin with previous acne lesions
    Permalink Gallery

    High-resolution imaging technique can detect vascular, structural changes caused by acne

High-resolution imaging technique can detect vascular, structural changes caused by acne

Researchers in Professor Ruikang Wang’s lab have demonstrated the capabilities of optical coherence tomography (OCT) -based microangiography in detecting high-resolution, three-dimensional structural and microvascular features of human skin affected by acne.

Buddy Ratner named 2015 Langmuir Lecturer

Buddy Ratner, UW professor of bioengineering and chemical engineering and the Michael L. & Myrna Darland Endowed Chair in Technology Commercialization, has been selected as a 2015 Langmuir Lecturer.

Suzie Pun, Albert Folch inducted as 2015 AIMBE Fellows

UW Bioengineering faculty Suzie Pun and Albert Folch were inducted to the AIMBE College of Fellows Class of 2015 at the AIMBE Annual Event, which was held March 15-17 in Washington, D.C.

  • smart magnetic nanoparticles
    Permalink Gallery

    Coulter program helps launch BioE technologies toward clinical impact

Coulter program helps launch BioE technologies toward clinical impact

Medical test and drug development technologies from UW Bioengineering have spun out into start-ups Nexgenia and Nanosurface Biomedical, with Coulter’s help.

  • Krittika D'Silva in India July 2014
    Permalink Gallery

    Student’s smartphone apps connect remote populations to health care, help

Student’s smartphone apps connect remote populations to health care, help

Undergraduate student Krittika D’Silva, dual major in UW Bioengineering and Computer Science, builds apps for global health and to help those in developing regions.

  • Sage Bionetworks ResearchKit Parkinson's app screenshots
    Permalink Sage Bionetworks' ResearchKit app enables patients with Parkinson's disease to partner in research.Gallery

    UW BioE alum Michael Kellen brings open source ideals to bioscience

UW BioE alum Michael Kellen brings open source ideals to bioscience

UW Bioengineering alumnus Michael Kellen of Sage Bionetworks works to bring open-source software technology and culture to the medical research community.

  • Empreva co-inventor Renuka Ramanathan
    Permalink Gallery

    Q&A with Renuka Ramanathan: BioE Ph.D. student works on Empreva, a prize-winning technology for women’s health

Q&A with Renuka Ramanathan: BioE Ph.D. student works on Empreva, a prize-winning technology for women’s health

No product currently on the market allows women to initiate both HIV prevention and contraception. Renuka and collaborators from the Woodrow lab seek to change this with Empreva, an innovative drug delivery platform that empowers women to take control of their own health.

Injectable polymer could stop bleeding, save lives

UW bioengineers from Suzie Pun’s lab, along with collaborators from Emergency Medicine and Chemical Engineering, have developed an injectable polymer that could keep soldiers and trauma patients from bleeding to death.

  • Aerial view of University of Kent Canterbury campus
    Permalink Gallery

    Ph.D. graduate Alice Ward Racca receives Marie Sklodowska-Curie post-doctoral fellowship to study human fetal skeletal and cardiac motor proteins

Ph.D. graduate Alice Ward Racca receives Marie Sklodowska-Curie post-doctoral fellowship to study human fetal skeletal and cardiac motor proteins

Recent Ph.D. graduate Alice Ward Racca is a recipient of a Marie Sklodowska-Curie Fellowship and will spend the next two years working with Dr. Michael Geeves of the University of Kent, UK, to better understand the myosin II isoforms that are predominantly expressed during in utero development