Course: BIOEN 325 – BioTransport I

Credits: 3; Three 50-min. lecture periods per week.

Instructor: Tom Lewis

Texts and Supplemental Materials:

Required:

  1. Welty, James R., Charles E. Wicks, Robert E. Wilson, and Gregory L. Rorrer. Fundamentals of Momentum, Heat, and Mass Transfer, Fifth Edition. John Wiley, 2008.

Optional:

  1. Truskey, George A., Fan Yuan, and David F. Katz. Transport Phenomena in Biological Systems, Second Edition. Prentice Hall/Pearson 2009.
  2. Pitts, Donald and Leighton E. Sissom. Schaum’s Outline of Heat Transfer, Second Edition. McGraw-Hill, 1998.

UW Catalog Description: Introduction to momentum and heat transport in medical and biological systems. Examines how differential and control-volume analyses produce ordinary and partial differential equations, and develops solution methods using analytical and computational techniques.

Overview: This course is an introduction to momentum and heat transport in medical and biological systems. Differential and control-volume analyses produce ordinary and partial differential equations, which  are solved using analytical and computational techniques. Topics include fluid statics, shear stress, Newtonian and non-Newtonian liquids, laminar/turbulent flow, pulsatile flow in compliant vessels, Bernoulli equation, boundary layers, temperature distribution in bodies, heat exchangers, metabolic heat generation and removal.

Prerequisites by Course: AMATH 301, MATH 307, PHYS 122

Prerequisites by Topic: Differential equations, introductory physics

Required or Elective: Required

Computer Use: Requires computational software for preparing homework and on-line access to communicate via email and download materials from the course web site.

Course Grading:

  • 35%     Assignments (10 assignments total; a detailed description of each assignment will be posted on the course website)
  • 15%     Quiz#1 (in-class 50 minute exam)
  • 20%     Quiz#1 (in-class 50 minute exam)
  • 30%     Final Exam (in-class 110 minute exam)

Topics Covered:

  1. Fluid Statics
  2. Bernoulli’s Equation and Generalized Integral Equations
  3. Momentum Balance in Viscous Flow
  4. Flows at Different Reynolds’ Numbers: Laminar and Turbulent Flows
  5. Differential Forms of Conservation Equations: Navier-Stokes
  6. Compliant Wall and Time Varying Fluid Flow
  7. Conduction Heat Transfer
  8. Heat Generation and Time-Varying Conduction
  9. Convection Heat Transfer
  10. Radiation Heat Transfer and Heat Exchangers

Course Outcomes and Assessment: This course presents, through tri-weekly class, an opportunity for students to explore a variety of techniques for applying conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy to living and non-living systems and using advanced mathematical techniques for solving such problems. As such, this course addresses certain ABET outcome criteria at a variety of levels.

Specific Outcomes: By the end of the course, students should be able to:

  1. Understand conservation of mass, momentum, and energy as applied to the flow of heat and fluids.
  2. Use control-volume analysis to formulate governing equations for simple flow and thermal geometries.
  3. Analyze complex fluid flows and thermal systems via approximate analytical tools or computational tools.
  4. Derive appropriate conservation equations, select boundary conditions, and apply analytical and computational techniques to solve flow and heat problems in biological and medical systems.
  5. Estimate fluid behavior in compliant structures and unsteady flows.
  6. Specify characteristics of fluid and thermal components in bio/medical systems.

Outcomes Addressed by this Course:

A. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.

  • Solve problems involving heat and momentum transfer as an introduction to partial derivatives, gradients, curls and partial differential equations.

In this course, students will apply basic physics principles to develop appropriate conservations equations relevant to bioengineering systems. They will solve problems involving heat and momentum transfer as an introduction to partial derivatives, gradients, curls, and partial differential equations. Student competency will be formally assessed through individual assignments and exams.

E. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.

  • Apply conservation equations to calculate fluid pressure, fluid velocity and systemic temperature profiles.

The students will practice engineering analysis by apply the appropriate conservation equations and identifying boundary conditions to calculate fluid pressure, fluid velocity and systemic temperature profiles in systems. Student competency will be formally assessed through individual assignments and exams.

L. An understanding of biology and physiology.

  • Understand the biomolecular basis of viscosity and the non-Newtonian properties of biological fluids.

The students will learn how biological components and systems can be characterized in an engineering context such as examining the biomolecular basis of viscosity and the non- Newtonian properties of biological fluids. Student competency will be formally assessed through individual assignments and exams.

M. The capability to apply advanced mathematics (including differential equations and statistics), science, and engineering to solve the problems at the interface of engineering and biology.

  • Analyze cardiovascular systems through application of continuity equations and properties of biological systems.

This class will present biological context along with the engineering fundamentals so that student can identify the importance of transport processes to the function of living systems as well as how changes in these processes often underlie pathological conditions. Also, these same analytical techniques can be used on medical technology as well. One application will be the analysis of the cardiovascular system through application of continuity equations and properties of biological systems. Student competency will be formally assessed through individual assignments and exams.

Relationship of course to departmental objectives:

The goal of our B.S. BIOEN program is to prepare our graduates for industry, graduate programs, and medicine. BIOEN 325 contributes to this goal by helping to ensure students are prepared to:

  1. Earn advanced degrees and/or employment in bioengineering-related fields, such as medicine, device development, or biotechnology.
  2.  Contribute to responsible development of new technical knowledge.

This course teaches students the development of fundamental principles of transport processes, the mathematical expression of these principles, and the analytical and computational solution of transport equations along with the characterization of composition, structure, and function of the living systems to which they are applied. These principles are also important in the design and operation of instrumentation used to analyze living systems, and in many of the technological interventions used to repair or improve tissues and organs.
Course Schedule:

Week Date Due Topics and Activities Readings Assign
1 th
Sept. 24
- Intro to BioTransport
- Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics
Welty 1.1-.4 Assignment 1:
Sept. 26th Fluid Statics Welty 2
(Opt. 2.4.1 in Trusky)
Sept. 28 Assignment 1 Conservation of Mass Welty 3
2 Oct. 1 Derivation of Bernoulli Equation Welty 6.3
(Opt. 4.4 in Trusky)
Assignment 2:
Oct. 3 Application of Bernoulli Equation
Oct. 5 Assignment 2 Derivation of Generalized Integral Eqns of Mass Welty 4
3 Oct. 8 Derivation of Generalized Integral Eqns of Momentum Assignment 3:
Oct. 10 Application of Generalized Integral Eqns
Oct. 12 Assignment 3 Linear Viscosity and Shear Stress Welty 7
4 Oct. 15 Application of Momentum Balances: Laminar flow in
Round tubes
Welty 8 Assignment 4:
Oct. 17th Laminar and Turbulent Flow Welty 12.1, 13
Oct. 19 Assignment 4 Derivation of Differential Form of Conservation Eqns.
5 Oct. 22 Quiz #1 Assignment 5:
Oct. 24th Navier-Stokes Welty 9
Oct. 26 Assignment 5 Application of Navier-Stokes
6 Oct. 29 Fluid flow in the Cardiovascular System Assignment 6:
Oct. 31st Time Varying Flow
Nov. 2 Assignment 6 Blood Rheology
7 Nov. 5 Combined Mechanisms of Heat Transfer Welty 15.1, 15.3-.6 Assignment 7:
Nov. 7th Application of One-dimensional Conduction Eqn. Welty 17.1
Nov. 9 Assignment 7 General Differential Equation of Heat Transfer Welty 16.2-.4 Assignment 8:
8 Nov. 12 Veteran’s Day Holiday
Nov. 14 Conduction with Heat Generation Welty 17.2
Nov. 16 Assignment 8 Steady State Conduction: Temperature Fields by
Separation of Variables
Welty 17.4
Week Date Due Topics and Activities Readings Assign
9 Nov. 19 Steady State Conduction: Temperature Fields by
Separation of Variables (con’t)
Nov. 21st Quiz #2 Welty 18.1
Nov. 23 - Thanksgiving Holiday - -
10 Nov. 26 Unsteady State Conduction: Lumped Parameter and
Transient Heat Conduction
Welty 19 Assignment 9:
Nov. 28 Derivation of Convection Heat Transfer Equations
Nov. 30 Assignment 9 Derivation of Convection Heat Transfer Equations Con’t
11 Dec. 3 Forced Convection Welty 20 Assignment 10:
Dec. 5 Heat Exchangers Welty 22
Dec. 7 Assignment 10 -Final Review
-Evaluations
12 Dec. 12
8:30 am
FINAL EXAM

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