Course: BIOEN 335: Biotransport II

Credits: 3

Instructor: James    Bryers

Texts and Supplemental Materials:

Transport Phenomena in Biological Systems (2nd Edition) (Hardcover) George A. Truskey, Fan Yuan, and David F. Katz

UW Catalog Description: Principles of combined mass transport in homogeneous and heterogeneous reaction systems as applied to biological processes. Introduction to chemical and biochemical reaction kinetics, methods of evaluating kinetic parameters from reaction rate data, prediction of the performance of biological and biochemical processes.

Instructor Overview: This course presents the fundamentals of molecular diffusion, reaction kinetics, and convective transport as applied to biological systems. Mathematical analysis and numerical simulation techniques will be applied to such topics as:  Fickian diffusion, immobilized enzyme kinetics, drug release, blood dialysis, oxygenation, and gene delivery.

Prerequisites by Course: Either MATH 307 or AMATH 351, BIOEN 325

Required or Elective: Required

Computer Use: Requires word-­‐processing software and PDF conversion software for preparing homework assignments; Internet deposit of homework assignments.

 Specific Outcomes: By the end of the course, students should be able to demonstrate the ability to derive continuity equations that describe the conservation of mass with a defined reaction system. Given specific system boundary and initial conditions, student will be able to analytically and numerically solve ordinary and partial differential equations that describe specific biological reaction systems.

Outcomes Addressed by this Course:

A. An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.

  • This entire course uses applied mathematics directed toward developing students’ ability    to describe complex biological processes that combine fluid movement and biological reaction. All homework exercises and examinations will be used to assess student competency in this outcome.

L. An understanding of biology and physiology.

  • This entire course uses applied mathematics directed toward developing students’ ability    to describe complex biological processes that combine fluid movement and biological reaction. Throughout the course, both in-class lectures and homework assignments will expose students to the mass transport and reaction mechanisms governing numerous key biological/physical processes. Certain homework exercises will be sued to assess student competency in this outcome.

M. The capability to apply advanced mathematics (including differential equations and statistics), science, and engineering to solve the problems at the interface of engineering and biology.

  • This entire course uses applied mathematics directed toward developing students’ ability    to describe complex biological processes that combine fluid movement and biological reaction. All homework exercises and examinations will be used to assess student competency in this outcome.

Relationship of Course to Program Educational Objectives:

Students learn important concepts including the fundamentals of molecular diffusion, reaction kinetics, and convective transport as applied to biological systems. Mathematical analysis and numerical simulation techniques are applied to such topics as:  Fickian diffusion, immobilized enzyme kinetics, drug release, blood dialysis, oxygenation, and gene delivery.  Students are required to apply mathematics to a variety of complex biological processes, and in doing so learn the language and procedures of engineering disciplines and medicine.  As such, this course should provide students with the capabilities to pursue advanced training or employment in a wide range of fields.  Thus, BIOEN 335 contributes to providing students with the tools necessary to reach the following Program Educational Objectives:

  1. Earn advanced degrees and/or obtain employment in bioengineering related fields, such as medicine, device development, or biotechnology.
  2. Advance their careers by obtaining appropriate educational and professional qualifications.
  3. Contribute to responsible development of new technical knowledge.

 

Topics Covered:

  1. What are transport phenomena? Analogy between Momentum, Energy, & Mass Transport Derivation of the Mass Continuity Equation
  2. Molecular Diffusivities, Translational Diffusion, Rotational Diffusion, Non-Fickian Diffusion
  3. Steady-State Molecular Diffusion (separation of Variable Solution Technique), Unsteady-State diffusion (Combination of Variables Solution Techniques)
  4. Basics of Reaction Rate Kinetics, Thermodynamics of Reactions, Reaction Stoichiometry
  5. Homogenous vs. Heterogeneous Reactions, Reaction Rate Expressions, Enzyme Kinetics, Adsorption Effects, Receptor: Ligand Binding
  6. Mass Transfer and Coupled Reaction
  7. Convective Mass Transport vs. Molecular Diffusion, Peclét Number Effects
  8. Examples: Blood Oxygenators; Urinary Dialysis Membranes
  9. Examples: Drug Delivery Stents, Receptor: Ligand Binding in Surface Plasmon Resonance
  10. Multi-Component Transport, Stefan-Maxwell Equations

 

Course Schedule:

Week Lecture Topics
1 What are Transport Phenomena? Analogy between momentum, energy, and mass transport derivation of the mass continuity equation.
2 Molecular Diffusivities, Translation Diffusion, Rotational Diffusion, Non-Fickian Diffusion
3 Steady-state Molecular Diffusion (Separation of Variables solution technique), Unsteady-state diffusion (combination of variables solution techniques)
4 Basics of Reaction Rate Kinetics, Thermodynamics of Reactions, Reaction Stoichiometry
5 Homogenous vs. Heterogeneous Reactions, Reaction Rate Expressions, Enzyme Kinetics, Adsorption Effects, Receptor:Ligand Binding
6 Mass Transfer with Coupled Reaction
7 Convective Mass Transport vs. Molecular Diffusion, Peclét Number Effects
8 Examples: Blood Oxygenators; Urinary Dialysis Membranes
9 Examples: Drug Delivery Stents, Recptor:igand Binding in Surface Plasmon Resonance
10 Multi-component Transport; Stefan-Maxwell Equations

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