Events

July 21, 2016 to September 8, 2016
Courses and Workshops
Maya Nader
Summer 2016 Compassion Cultivation Training (8 weeks)
Thursdays, 6:00 - 8:00pm  »  CCFW

Registration is required. Please register here.

Course Description

Compassion Cultivation Training (CCT) is an eight-week course designed to enhance the qualities of strength, courage, and resilience. We meet once a week for 2 hours to learn how to integrate meditation into our urban, busy lives. Through in-class interaction, we pause and reassess the business -and meaning- of our lives.  Scientific research and contemporary psychology on compassion reconnect us to our innate compassion and inform a more mindful state of mind. We engage in group exercises and discussions to seek ways to let our empathy arise without feeling overwhelmed. The program was developed at Stanford University Medical School’s CCARE by a team of contemplative scholars, clinical psychologists, and researchers.

Research indicates that CCT increases compassion for others, from others, and for self. It also:

  • Increases Mindfulness skills, self-efficacy, care for self and others, and mind wandering toward pleasant topics.
  • Decreases worry and mind wandering onto unpleasant topics.

Class flyer

Class Schedule

8-Week Course, Thursday evenings from 6:00 - 8:00pm, July 21 - September 8

Class size: 6 - 15 participants

Please note: CCFW requries a minimum of 6 participants to run this class. If we must cancel this class due to under enrollment, you will be notified no later than 1 week prior to the start date and you will receive a full refund. 

Course Fees

$275.00 regular registration
$280.00: Registration with clock hours or a certificate of completion to use for CEUs
$206.25 (25% off): UW Affiliate Registration, which requires department approval and budget number
Scholarships and income-based reduced fee options available. Please see the registration page for details, or email mindful@uw.edu

About the Instructor

Maya is a certified CCT instructor by CCARE, Stanford University. A native of Beirut, Lebanon, Maya earned her B.A. in Political Science from the American University of Beirut. She moved to the US in 1989, at the height of the Lebanese war. As she continued her quest for peace in her country and region, Maya obtained a Master’s degree in Communication and Marketing from Boston University. She speaks French, Arabic, and English and is grateful for the cultural richness these languages encompass. Through this lens, Maya views compassion as a bridge between cultures and religions and as the cornerstone of a more peaceful world. In her teaching CCT, Maya continues to practice self-help and assist others in broadening compassion, which ultimately creates opportunities for peace. More on Maya at mayanader.com

July 19, 2016
Drop-in Meditation Sessions
Robyn Long
Drop-in Meditation Session: Mindful Movement
6:00 - 7:00pm  »  CCFW

Drop-in meditation sessions are free. Registration is requested. Please register here

Mindful Movement combines gentle yoga stretches and breathing practices to promote focus and relaxation.  Linking the breath with each movement is an excellent foundation for building a home meditation practice. Programs incorporating yoga poses, breathing, and meditation practices have been found to stimulate the parasympathetic nervous system (aka, the relaxation response). Studies have also shown that yoga can decrease inflammation, increase attention and self-regulation, as well as promote overall health and well-being.

All stretches will be done sitting in a chair or standing. No experience or special equipment is needed – all you need for class is your breath! Participants will receive handouts to inspire their home practice.

About the Instructor

Robyn is passionate about sharing yoga as a form of mindfulness with people from all backgrounds. She has been teaching meditation and yoga for seven years in a variety of settings. She values, practices, and draws upon all of yoga’s tools, including asana (postures), pranayama (breathing practices), and dhyana (meditation). Robyn has completed yoga and meditation teacher training programs at the Krishnamacharya Healing Yoga Foundation (Chennai, India; 1,000 hours) and the New England School of Integrative Yoga Therapeutics (Boston, MA; 200 hours). She also has specialized training in yoga for cancer patients and survivors, yoga for children, yoga for persons with disabilities, and prenatal and postnatal yoga. More at www.robynlongyoga.com  

July 5, 2016
Drop-in Meditation Sessions
Richard Berger, MD
Drop-in Meditation Session: Awareness of Breath
6:00 - 7:00pm  »  CCFW

Drop-in meditation sessions are free. Registration is requested. Please register here.

CCFW is pleased to offer monthly drop-in meditation sessions. A different CCFW instructor will lead each month’s session so that participants can experience different mindfulness practices and instructor styles. These sessions are also intended to support participants from previous mindfulness courses in strengthening their home practice. All levels of experience are welcome.

Please note: In June – August we will have two sessions per month: the first and third Tuesday of each month. Starting in September there will be only one session on the first Tuesday of each month.

About this Session

In this session we will share the mindfulness practice of awareness of breath. This very basic practice has been shown to increase concentration, focus, mental clarity, and cause improved function and growth of the executive function, memory, and emotional centers of the brain. Breath awareness also helps one develop the tools and areas of the brain necessary for more advanced mindfulness practices.

About the Instructor

Richard (Rick) E. Berger, MD, Professor Emeritus in the Medical School at the University of Washington, is the primary teacher of Mindfulness NW. He received his undergraduate education and medical degree from The University of Chicago. He received his certification in the teaching of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction at the University of Massachusetts Center for Mindfulness  and received a Certification in Mindfulness Facilitation from the Mindful Awareness Research Center at the University of California in Los Angeles. Rick has taught Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Mindful Awareness Practices (MAPS) classes at the University of Washington Hospital, the University of Washington Intramural Activities Center and the Center for Child and Family Well-being. He also holds certificates to teach mindfulness to children and adolescents from Inner Kids and Mindful Schools and teaches mindfulness in the Seattle Public Schools. His ongoing practice includes daily meditation, yoga, silent retreats and continuing education in mindfulness and related areas.

June 21, 2016
Drop-in Meditation Sessions
Robyn Long
Drop-in Meditation Session: Mindful Movement
6:00 - 7:00pm  »  CCFW

Drop-in meditation sessions are free. Registration is requested. Please use this link to register.

CCFW is pleased to offer monthly drop-in meditation sessions. A different CCFW instructor will lead each month’s session so that participants can experience different mindfulness practices and instructor styles. These sessions are also intended to support participants from previous mindfulness courses in strengthening their home practice. All levels of experience are welcome.

Please note: In June – August we will have two sessions per month: the first and third Tuesday of each month. Starting in September there will be only one session on the first Tuesday of each month.

About this Session

Mindful Movement combines gentle yoga stretches and breathing practices to promote focus and relaxation.  Linking the breath with each movement is an excellent foundation for building a home meditation practice. Programs incorporating yoga poses, breathing, and meditation practices have been found to stimulate the parasympathetic nervous system (aka, the relaxation response). Studies have also shown that yoga can decrease inflammation, increase attention and self-regulation, as well as promote overall health and well-being.

All stretches will be done sitting in a chair or standing. No experience or special equipment is needed – all you need for class is your breath! Participants will receive handouts to inspire their home practice.

About the Instructor
Robyn is passionate about sharing yoga as a form of mindfulness with people from all backgrounds. She has been teaching meditation and yoga for seven years in a variety of settings. She values, practices, and draws upon all of yoga’s tools, including asana (postures), pranayama (breathing practices), and dhyana (meditation). Robyn has completed yoga and meditation teacher training programs at the Krishnamacharya Healing Yoga Foundation (Chennai, India; 1,000 hours) and the New England School of Integrative Yoga Therapeutics (Boston, MA; 200 hours). She also has specialized training in yoga for cancer patients and survivors, yoga for children, yoga for persons with disabilities, and prenatal and postnatal yoga. More at www.robynlongyoga.com  

June 7, 2016
Courses and Workshops
Maya Nader
Drop-in Meditation Session: Compassion and Mindfulness Meditation
6:00 - 7:00pm  »  CCFW

Drop-in meditation sessions are free. Registration is requested. Please use this link to register.

CCFW is pleased to offer monthly drop-in meditation sessions. A different CCFW instructor will lead each month’s session so that participants can experience different mindfulness practices and instructor styles. These sessions are also intended to support participants from previous mindfulness courses in strengthening their home practice. All levels of experience are welcome.

Please note: In June – August we will have two sessions per month: the first and third Tuesday of each month. Starting in September there will be only one session on the first Tuesday of each month.

About this Session:

This session is inspired by Compassion Cultivation Training (CCT), which combines traditional contemplative practices with contemporary psychology and research. CCT is an eight week program designed to strengthen resilience, increase connection with others, and provide a general sense of well-being. Research demonstrates that CCT increases compassion for others, from others, and for self. It also increases mindfulness skills, self-efficacy, care for self and others, and the mind wandering toward pleasant topics. CCT has also been found to decrease worry and mind wandering onto unpleasant topics.

About the Instructor

Maya is a certified CCT instructor by the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education at Stanford University. A native of Beirut, Lebanon, Maya earned her B.A. in Political Science from the American University of Beirut. She moved to the US in 1989, at the height of the Lebanese war. As she continued her quest for peace in her country and region, Maya obtained a Master’s degree in Communication and Marketing from Boston University. She speaks French, Arabic, and English and is grateful for the cultural richness these languages encompass. Through this lens, Maya views compassion as a bridge between cultures and religions and as the cornerstone of a more peaceful world. In her teaching CCT, Maya continues to practice self-help and assist others in broadening compassion, which ultimately creates opportunities for peace. More on Maya at mayanader.com

April 24, 2016 to June 5, 2016
Courses and Workshops
Ann Hollar, M.Ed.
Mindfulness 101 for Teens
Sundays 4:00 - 5:15pm, no class on 5/29  »  CCFW

Registration is required. Please register here.

Is your teen driven to distraction? Overwhelmed with keeping up socially on-line and off? Stressed about homework? Caught up in negative thinking? In this six week course we will touch on many aspects of mindfulness that will help your teen navigate these exciting and complex high school years. This course is intended for high school aged teenagers (14-19 years old). Class size will range between 10 and 20 students. 

Last year, 100% of teens who took this class at CCFW said they would recommend it to a friend. Mindfulness helped...

  • 100% of the class calm down when upset or stressed
  • 93% be better listeners
  • 79% make better decisions
  • 71% avoid fights or arguments

After taking Mindfulness 101, teens said: 

"I use at least one thing I learned in the mindfulness class every day, and it's been very helpful to keep my mind organized and keep myself centered. The breathing exercises help me relax in stressful situations."

"Mindfulness helps me focus and relax at the same time. The class was great since it was all high school students with the same pressures of homework, tests and friends. The lessons and meditation help me find calm and step back to see the bigger picture."

"I learned how to listen to others way better (friends, family, teachers). The breathing exercise also helps me fall asleep."

"Life can be overwhelming and this helps a lot."

"Mindfulness has helped me put more effort into trying to discern what is real vs. imagined."

"If I just focus on one thing at a time I am better off."

"I was pretty upset going to a class at school, and I used mindful walking to calm down."

"Bad grade on a quiz - I acknowledged sadness but didn't let it hold me back. Missed a shot in soccer - moved past it and scored."

"Ann's class made learning about mediation not only relatable but also enjoyable. I looked forward to going to her class as well as employing her methods in circumstances that I normally would have been unsure of what to do in. Working with Ann was a pleasure, and I look forward to continuing the use of mediation in stressful and foreign circumstances. Thank you Ann!"

Tentative Schedule

Week 1 April 24: Brain, Body, Breath - Understanding the basics

Week 2 May1: Home Sweet Home - Creating a sense of ease within ourselves

Week 3 May 8: Driven to Distraction - Learning how to focus attention

Week 4 May 15: Making Sense of your Senses - Slowing down and noticing

Week 5 May 22: Riding the Storm - Being with, not thrown, by strong emotions

Week 6 June 5: Giving Thanks - The power of gratitude and kindness

About the Instructor

Ann Hollar is a mindfulness instructor in Seattle. She has a M. Ed from the University of Washington, focusing her thesis on “Mindfulness in Education:  The Secular Intersection of Buddhism and Neuroscience.” She currently teaches mindfulness to students in both public and private elementary, middle and high schools. She has been trained in both the MindUp and Mindful Schools curricula and has recently completed Mindful Schools Year-Long Instructor Certification Program. Her personal integration of mindfulness is constantly being kept alive via interactions with her three tween and teenaged boys.

"Thank you for creating a safe, nurturing space for our children to establish their own practice of mindfulness and appreciation. Through your course, we saw a gentle shift as our kids practiced noticing their thoughts, focusing their attention, and expanding their capacity for gratitude. Having "homework" helped them naturally establish a practice that carried over long after your classes were complete. Thank you for laying the groundwork for a practice that can help them through the inevitable stress of adolescence and beyond."

"Our daughter loved learning ways to relax and de -stress from Ann. She creates a safe, compassionate community where our daughter found inner peace."  

"Students are experiencing higher levels of stress and Ann's class offers strategies and alternatives which allow them to feel less anxious, more balanced and more capable of managing the stress." 

Scholarships

If you are able to pay more, we encourage you to please consider donating to our Mindfulness Outreach Fund. This fund allows us to provide 50% and 100% scholarships to individuals working with children and families who would benefit from mindfulness training, but are unable to pay the full registration fee. If you would like to make a donation towards our scholarship fund, please visit http://giving.uw.edu/mindfulness.​

If you are a professional working with children and families, especially high-risk families, you may qualify for one of our financial scholarships. To apply for a scholarship, please review and complete the application form at https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/mindful/237140. The deadline to apply for a scholarship for this class is March 24, 2016. Any applications received past this date will be considered on a space available basis. We will notify you no later than March 31 of our decision. *Note: Applicants must wait to register for the course until a decision has been made in order to qualify. Applicants who are already registered for the course unfortunately cannot be considered for a scholarship. 

April 15, 2016
Professional Events
Cynthia Price, PhD MA LMP
Mindful Body Awareness for Self-Care: Interoceptive Awareness Skills for Health Care Professionals
10:00am - 5:00pm  »  CCFW Room 151

Registration is required. Please register here.

Course Description: 
Mindful attention to the body, involving interoceptive awareness (i.e. awareness of inner body sensations), is a powerful tool for regulation and self-care. For health professionals, mindful body awareness can be useful to facilitate presence in your practice and to protect against burn-out.  These tools may also be useful to your clients, particularly those who are highly stressed or anxious, or disconnected from their bodies due to physical or emotional pain, or trauma.  In this one-day class you will learn some simple mindful body awareness tools to use in your practice for self-care, and these same tools can also be taught to your clients to facilitate their own awareness and self-care.   

Date: Friday, April 15, 2016 from 10am – 5pm.

Minimum enrollment: 10; Max enrollment: 20

About the Instructor:
Cynthia Price, Ph.D., M.A., LMP is a Research Assoc. Professor at the University of Washington. Cynthia's research and clinical expertise is in the acquisition of interoceptive awareness. In private practice for 20 years, she developed Mindful Awareness in Body-oriented Therapy (MABT) to teach interoceptive awareness and related skills for self-care and emotion regulation.  Her research program is focused on studying the efficacy and mechanisms of MABT for distressed populations.  The majority of her work focuses on community-based research for individuals who are disconnected from their bodies due to substance use, trauma or pain. She is the Director of the Center for Mindful Body Awareness (http://cmbaware.org/), a non-profit focused on teaching MABT, and integrating mindful body awareness education into programs for underserved populations. 

March 31, 2016 to May 19, 2016
Courses and Workshops
Richard Berger, MD
Spring 2016 Cultivating Happiness: A Mindfulness-Based Path
Thursdays 6:30 - 9:00pm | Retreat on Saturday May 7, 9:00am - 5:00pm  »  CCFW

Registration is required. Please register here.

Course Description: Everyone in the world wants to be happy. Happiness is an elusive and complicated emotion.  It is impermanent. Yet we have input into our own happiness and even the happiness of others. By developing our awareness of what makes ourselves and others happy, we can make conscious decisions about where to concentrate our efforts to be happier. Furthermore, happiness can improve our productivity, creativity, and energy.

Neuroscience tells us that our brains are changed by what we think and what we do. We can purposefully and skillfully change our own brains and minds. In this series of classes we will systematically learn a mindfulness-based approach to becoming more aware and happy. Read more about why happiness is good for your health in this article on the Greater Good website

Course Goals:

•    To become aware of scientifically proven factors in happiness and how happiness is contagious

•    To become more aware of what makes experience pleasant and unpleasant

•    We will become proficient in practices that can mold our brains, minds, and consciousness to allow more happiness in our lives and the lives of others

•    To become more compassionate of the unhappiness of ourselves and those around us

•    To increase our happiness and equanimity

The Happiness class material has been inspired by several sources including Mindful Compassion by Paul Gilbert and Choden, Zen Heart by Ezra Bayda, One small Step can Change your Life by Robert Maurer, works by Jon Kabat-Zinn, the Headspace Happiness Series, Seeing that Frees by Rob Burba, Greater Good sources and others. Increased well-being has been shown to be a by product of practicing mindfulness and compassion. In this course, specific practices which are aimed at increasing happiness will be emphasized. Increased happiness has been shown to improve well-being, work productivity, creativeness and the happiness of others. Happiness is not a selfish undertaking but creates happiness in those around you as well. Homework will include informal daily practices and short formal practice sessions. Emphasis will be placed on awareness of the moments of happiness in our life, overcoming negative bias, and developing a consistent program conducive to your happiness and those around you, and dispelling disproven myths about happiness.

Note: This class is intended to be an educational class and not therapy for depression. In light of this, the instructor recommends you read this self-screening questionnaire to determine whether now is a proper time for you to take the course.

Course Dates: 8 week course of 8 weekly 2.5 hour classes
March 31 - May 19, 2016 from 6:30 - 9pm
Retreat on Saturday May 7 from 9am-5pm (Location TBD)

Daily meditation and life practice at highly recommended.

Class size: 10 - 25 participants

Please note: CCFW requries a minimum of 10 participants to run this class. If we must cancel this class due to under enrollment, you will be notified no later than 1 week prior to the start date and you will receive a full refund. 

About the Instructor

Richard (Rick) E. Berger, MD, Professor Emeritus in the Medical School at the University of Washington, is the primary teacher of Mindfulness NW. He received his undergraduate education and medical degree from The University of Chicago. He received his certification in the teaching of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction at the University of Massachusetts Center for Mindfulness  and received a Certification in Mindfulness Facilitation from the Mindful Awareness Research Center at the University of California in Los Angeles. Rick has taught Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Mindful Awareness Practices (MAPS) classes at the University of Washington Hospital, the University of Washington Intramural Activities Center and the Center for Child and Family Well-being. He also holds certificates to teach mindfulness to children and adolescents from Inner Kids and Mindful Schools and teaches mindfulness in the Seattle Public Schools. His ongoing practice includes daily meditation, yoga, silent retreats and continuing education in mindfulness and related areas.

"The best part of the class was interacting with Dr. Berger, experiencing his good heart, the daily practice of meditating, and the frequent practice of mindfulness during each day. As a result of the class activities, I feel much more connected to myself, more calm and peaceful, happy."

"I like the way Rick led the class with gentleness and patience. He led us, but at the same time made it seem he was on the journey with us."

"Rick did a great job at teaching the material and was welcoming and accessible and made it seem so easy. I appreciated his humor too!" 

"Rick Berger was wise, present, patience, funny, and accepting."

"I enjoyed Richard's cheerful patient attitude."

"Rick was great- he made the class very safe."

Scholarships

If you are able to pay more, we encourage you to please consider donating to our Mindfulness Outreach Fund. This fund allows us to provide 50% and 100% scholarships to individuals working with children and families who would benefit from mindfulness training, but are unable to pay the full registration fee. If you would like to make a donation towards our scholarship fund, please visit http://giving.uw.edu/mindfulness.​

If you are a professional working with children and families, especially high-risk families, you may qualify for one of our financial scholarships. To apply for a scholarship, please review and complete the application form at https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/mindful/237140. The deadline to apply for a scholarship for this class is 1 month prior to the class beginning. Any applications received past this date will be considered on a space available basis. We will notify you no later than 3 weeks prior to the class beginning of our decision. *Note: Applicants must wait to register for the course until a decision has been made in order to qualify. Applicants who are already registered for the course unfortunately cannot be considered for a scholarship. 

March 30, 2016 to May 18, 2016
Courses and Workshops
Elizabeth Lin, MD, MPH
Spring 2016 Mindful Self-Compassion 8-Week Course
Wednesdays 6:00 - 8:30pm | Retreat on Saturday May 14, 9:00am - 1:00pm  »  CCFW

This course is now sold out. To add your name to the waitlist, please register here. Registration is required. 

Mindful Self-Compassion or “MSC” is an empirically-supported 8-week training program developed by Drs. Chris Germer and Kristin Neff.  It helps participants cultivate the mental and emotional habit of mindful self-compassion by learning the process of infusing our moment-to-moment experience with kindness, especially when we feel frustrated, hurt, inadequate, or overwhelmed. Mindful self-compassion is the first step in emotional healing—being able to be-friend oneself, turn inwardly and acknowledge our difficult thoughts and feelings with a spirit of openness, curiosity and love, rather than self-judgment, or self-criticism.

Perhaps most importantly, cultivating self-compassion means that we honor and accept our humanness. Things will not always go the way we want them to. We often encounter frustrations and losses. We make mistakes and bump up against our limitations, or fall short of our ideals. This is the human condition, a reality shared by us all. The more we open our heart to this reality instead of constantly fighting against it, the more we will be able to feel compassion for ourselves and all our fellow humans.

Research has shown that self-compassion greatly enhances emotional well-being. It boosts resilience, happiness, reduces anxiety and depression, and can even help maintain healthy lifestyle habits such as diet and exercise. Being both mindful and compassionate leads to greater ease and well-being in our daily lives. MSC can be learned by anyone. It’s the practice of recognizing moments of difficulty, and repeatedly evoking good will toward ourselves. It extends cultivation of that same desire beyond ourselves to all living beings to live happily and free from suffering.

In the weekly program, participants will learn through activities such as meditation, experiential exercises, short presentations, group discussion and home practices. Learning is mostly experiential and includes current theory and research on self-compassion. 

Schedule: 

8-week course from 6:00 - 8:30pm
Wednesdays 3/30, 4/6, 4/13, 4/20, 4/27, 5/4, 5/11, 5/18
Retreat on Saturday, May 14 from 9am-1pm

About the Instructor

Elizabeth H. B. Lin, MD, MPH.  Dr. Lin, a family medicine physician, is a clinical professor at the School of Medicine, University of Washington and an affiliate scientific investigator at the Group Health Research Institute. As a physician researcher, Dr. Lin is well-known for research on improving mind-body health in general medical settings. Elizabeth has had a daily meditation practice for more than 20 years.  She has trained extensively with leaders in mindfulness programs, and began teaching Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction 4 years ago. Dr. Lin recently trained with Drs. Chris Germer and Kristen Neff, to become a teacher in Mindful Self-Compassion. 

Scholarship Fund

If you are able to pay more, we encourage you to please consider donating to our Mindfulness Outreach Fund. This fund allows us to provide 50% and 100% scholarships to individuals working with children and families who would benefit from mindfulness training, but are unable to pay the full registration fee. If you would like to make a donation towards our scholarship fund, please visit http://giving.uw.edu/mindfulness.​

March 29, 2016 to May 17, 2016
Courses and Workshops
Richard Berger, MD
Spring 2016 Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Course (Tues)
Tuesdays 6:30 - 9:00pm | Retreat on Saturday May 7, 9:00am - 5:00pm  »  CCFW

Registration is required. Please register here.

Course Description: Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a program originally designed over thirty years ago by Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph.D. The course has a basis in eastern psychology but is very applicable to modern secular life. Mindfulness is the practice of sustained focus, self-regulation, self-exploration, and self-liberation with an accepting, open and kind attitude. This practice can produce calmness and expanded awareness. Neurophysiological studies have shown increased brain growth and function in areas of emotional control and executive function in as little as 8 weeks. Research shows decreased stress, improved self-image, and improved emotional regulation. Improved concentration and less anxiety are common outcomes.

Class Dates: 8-week course on Tuesday evenings for 2.5 hours
March 29 - May 17, 2016 from 6:30 - 9:00pm
Retreat on Saturday May 7 from 9am-5pm (Location TBD)

About the Instructor

Richard (Rick) E. Berger, MD, Professor Emeritus in the Medical School at the University of Washington, is the primary teacher of Mindfulness NW. He received his undergraduate education and medical degree from The University of Chicago. He received his certification in the teaching of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction at the University of Massachusetts Center for Mindfulness  and received a Certification in Mindfulness Facilitation from the Mindful Awareness Research Center at the University of California in Los Angeles. Rick has taught Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Mindful Awareness Practices (MAPS) classes at the University of Washington Hospital, the University of Washington Intramural Activities Center and the Center for Child and Family Well-being. He also holds certificates to teach mindfulness to children and adolescents from Inner Kids and Mindful Schools and teaches mindfulness in the Seattle Public Schools. His ongoing practice includes daily meditation, yoga, silent retreats and continuing education in mindfulness and related areas.

"The best part of the class was interacting with Dr. Berger, experiencing his good heart, the daily practice of meditating, and the frequent practice of mindfulness during each day. As a result of the class activities, I feel much more connected to myself, more calm and peaceful, happy."

"I like the way Rick led the class with gentleness and patience. He led us, but at the same time made it seem he was on the journey with us."

"Rick did a great job at teaching the material and was welcoming and accessible and made it seem so easy. I appreciated his humor too!" 

"Rick Berger was wise, present, patience, funny, and accepting."

"I enjoyed Richard's cheerful patient attitude."

"Rick was great- he made the class very safe."

Scholarship Fund

If you are able to pay more, we encourage you to please consider donating to our Mindfulness Outreach Fund. This fund allows us to provide 50% and 100% scholarships to individuals working with children and families who would benefit from mindfulness training, but are unable to pay the full registration fee. If you would like to make a donation towards our scholarship fund, please visit http://giving.uw.edu/mindfulness.

If you are a professional working with children and families, especially high-risk families, you may qualify for one of our financial scholarships. To apply for a scholarship, please review and complete the application form at https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/mindful/237140. The deadline to apply for a scholarship for this class is 1 month prior to the class beginning. Any applications received past this date will be considered on a space available basis. We will notify you no later than 3 weeks prior to the class beginning of our decision. *Note: Applicants must wait to register for the course until a decision has been made in order to qualify. Applicants who are already registered for the course unfortunately cannot be considered for a scholarship. 

 

March 28, 2016 to May 16, 2016
Courses and Workshops
Elizabeth Lin, MD, MPH
Spring 2016 Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction 8-Week Course (Mon)
Mondays 6:00 - 8:30pm | Retreat on Saturday May 7, 9:00am - 3:30pm  »  CCFW

Registration is required. Please register here.

Please review this note from Dr. Lin BEFORE registering to ensure that this class will be a proper fit for your needs.

Class Description

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a scientifically proven program developed by Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph.D. to reduce stress and increase well-being. It is flourishing worldwide. This 8 –week course combines contemplative practices based in Eastern philosophy, western psychology, and cutting-edge neuroscience.  Attitudes of kindness, acceptance and patience provide a foundation for the practices of sustained focus, self-regulation and self-exploration.  A greater sense of balance, choice and freedom is cultivated.

Benefits of MBSR: Participants have remarked, “Mindfulness has changed how I live and see the world, how I interact with others”. This course contribute to:

1. Reduced stress and chronic pain
2. Improved mood
3. Overcoming sleep problems
4. Decreased anxiety
5. Increased immunity
6. Enhanced resilience, joy, and compassion
7. Healthy aging

In this 8-week experiential course consisting of weekly classes, and home practices, participants will learn exercises to:

1. Increase awareness of body sensations (body scan)
2. Mindful movement and stretching (yoga)
3. Awareness of pleasant and unpleasant experiences
4. Awareness of thoughts and emotions
5. Increase compassion for ourselves and others
6. Latest research on mind-body response to stress and change
7. Practices to cultivate mindfulness throughout the day, living each moment to its fullest

Schedule: 8-week course, Monday evenings from 6:00 - 8:30pm with a retreat on Saturday 5/7 from 9:00am - 3:00pm 

Monday, March 28, 2016: 6:00-9:00pm (Waiver and pre-class questionnaires completed)
Monday, April 4, 2016: 6:00-8:30pm
Monday, April 11, 2016: 6:00-8:30pm
Monday, April 18, 2016: 6:00-8:30pm
Monday, April 25, 2016: 6:00-8:30pm
Monday, May 2, 2016: 6:00-8:30pm 
Saturday, May 7, 2016: 9:00am-3:30pm (Silent Retreat)
Monday, May 9, 2016: 6:00-8:30pm
Monday, May 16, 2016: 6:00-8:30pm (Post-class questionnaires completed)

About the Instructor

The course will be taught by Elizabeth H. B. Lin, MD, MPH. Dr. Lin is a family medicine physician, clinical professor at the University of Washington School of Medicine, and an affiliate scientific investigator at the Group Health Research Institute. As a physician researcher, Dr. Lin is well-known for scientific studies on improving mental and behavioral health for patients in general medical settings. Elizabeth has trained with Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn, founder of the Center for Mindfulness at the University of Massachusetts  as well as other leading professors and teachers in this field. She has had a daily meditation practice for more than 20 years, and has taught MBSR for the last 4 years. Dr. Lin received her certification in the teaching of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction at the University of Massachusetts Center for Mindfulness.

"Dr. Lin is a wonderful, caring, respectful and well-prepared instructor and did a fantastic job teaching this class. I particularly appreciated her taking time to answer questions in a thoughtful way. This, along with the content of what she said, was most enlightening for me, because I have begun to pause and take more time in my own communications with other people." 

"Elizabeth is a welcoming and receptive instructor and communicated her own enthusiasm for a mindfulness approach to life in general. I liked how she used her own experience as a student of mindfulness over many years." 

"Elizabeth is wonderful. She walks the talk which is just as important as being the excellent MBSR instructor that she is." 

"Elizabeth is very thoughtful, non-judgmental, humble, and caring." 

Scholarship Fund

If you are able to pay more, we encourage you to please consider donating to our Mindfulness Outreach Fund. This fund allows us to provide 50% and 100% scholarships to individuals working with children and families who would benefit from mindfulness training, but are unable to pay the full registration fee. If you would like to make a donation towards our scholarship fund, please visit http://giving.uw.edu/mindfulness.​

If you are a professional working with children and families, especially high-risk families, you may qualify for one of our financial scholarships. To apply for a scholarship, please review and complete the application form at https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/mindful/237140. The deadline to apply for a scholarship for this class is 1 month prior to the class beginning. Any applications received past this date will be considered on a space available basis. We will notify you no later than 3 weeks prior to the class beginning of our decision. *Note: Applicants must wait to register for the course until a decision has been made in order to qualify. Applicants who are already registered for the course unfortunately cannot be considered for a scholarship. 

March 22, 2016
Free Public Lectures
Dr. Rick Hanson
Mindful Cultivation: Growing Happiness, Compassion, Resilience, and Other Inner Strengths
7:00 - 8:30 pm  »  Kane Hall 130

We grow happiness, compassion, resilience, and other inner strengths in ourselves and our children by turning passing experiences of them into lasting changes in the brain. Unfortunately, most beneficial experiences wash through us like water through a sieve, while stressful, painful experiences “stick" due to the brain’s negativity bias. Mindfulness of passing mental states is not enough: this talk will explore how to deepen an embodied intimacy with beneficial experiences - without clinging to them - to increase their encoding in neural networks. Then daily life at home, at school, and in clinical settings is full of opportunities for lasting healing, growth, and transformation.

Dr. Hanson will be signing books after the lecture. You can purchase Hardwiring Happiness;  Buddha’s Brain; Just One Thing from the University Bookstore table before and after the lecture. 

About the Presenter

Rick Hanson, Ph.D., is a psychologist, Senior Fellow of the Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley, and New York Times best-selling author. His books include Hardwiring Happiness (in 14 languages), Buddha’s Brain (in 25 languages), Just One Thing (in 14 languages), and Mother Nurture. He edits the Wise Brain Bulletin and has several audio programs. A summa cum laude graduate of UCLA and founder of the Wellspring Institute for Neuroscience and Contemplative Wisdom, he’s been an invited speaker at Oxford, Stanford, and Harvard, and taught in meditation centers worldwide. His work has been featured on BBC, CBS, and NPR, and he offers the free Just One Thing newsletter with over 110,000 subscribers, plus the online Foundations of Well-Being program in positive neuroplasticity. (https://www.rickhanson.net)

Help Support Center for Child & Family Well-Being!

There is no cost for registration for this event. However, your donation ($20 suggested) will allow CCFW to continue to offer these valuable events as an accessible resource to the community. To help support us, you may donate anytime through the University of Washington Giving Page at giving.uw.edu/mindfulness.

Thank you to our generous sponsors!

 

February 22, 2016 to March 14, 2016
Courses and Workshops
Dr. Liliana Lengua
Mindfulness in Parenting: Infusing Everyday Parenting Moments with Mindfulness
Mondays 6:30 - 8:00pm  »  CCFW

Registration is required (closes 2/21/16). Please register here.

 

Course Description

4 weekly sessions, 1.5 hours each
Mondays 6:30 - 8:00pm (2/22, 2/29, 3/7, 3/14)
Max enrollment: 25

Dr. Liliana Lengua, Child Psychologist, Psychology Professor and Director of the Center for Child and Family Well-Being will lead this 4-week training on evidence-based mindful parenting, including tools for brining mindfulness into your everyday interactions with your child.

Using best practices in parenting is challenging for most parents, particularly when families are experiencing stress or disruptions from economic or work challenges, family conflict, mental health issues, divorce, bereavement, or other stressful life circumstances, or when dealing with temperamentally challenging children. Parents who can adopt mindfulness practices might be better able to engage in effective parenting and positive interactions with their children. Dr. Lengua will interweave mindfulness practices with best parenting practices that can be used in every-day interactions between parents and children to enhance parents’ effectiveness and satisfaction in interacting with their children.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn best parenting practices of warmth, consistency, and scaffolding
  • Use mindfulness practices to increase use of best parenting practices
  • Use mindfulness practices to be present, calm and wise-minded
  • Combine specific parenting and mindfulness practices when interacting with children.

About the Presenter

Liliana Lengua, Ph.D., UW Professor of Psychology and director of the Center for Child and Family Well-Being, is a child clinical psychologist and a mother of 3 children. She is an internationally recognized expert on children’s vulnerable and resilient responses to stress, demonstrating how parenting and children’s temperament contributes to children’s unique responses to stress. She is also recognized for her research on the effects of stress and disadvantage on parenting and children’s social-emotional development, and has developed and evidence-based parenting program infused with mindfulness practices to enhance parenting effectiveness. She has been the principal investigator of several federally funded research projects and is the author of over 60 published papers.

January 28, 2016 to March 17, 2016
Courses and Workshops
Yaffa Maritz and Elizabeth Lin
Winter 2016 Mindful Self-Compassion 8-Week Course
Thursdays 12:00 - 2:30pm OR 6:00 - 8:30pm | Retreat on Sunday March 6, 1:30 - 5:30pm  »  CCFW

Registration is FULL. Please add your name to the wait list for the daytime section here (12 - 2:30pm) or add your name to the wait list for the evening section evening section here (6:00 - 8:30pm).

Mindful Self-Compassion or “MSC” is an empirically-supported 8-week training program developed by Drs. Chris Germer and Kristin Neff.  It helps participants cultivate the mental and emotional habit of mindful self-compassion by learning the process of infusing our moment-to-moment experience with kindness, especially when we feel frustrated, hurt, inadequate, or overwhelmed. Mindful self-compassion is the first step in emotional healing—being able to be-friend oneself, turn inwardly and acknowledge our difficult thoughts and feelings with a spirit of openness, curiosity and love, rather than self-judgment, or self-criticism.

Perhaps most importantly, cultivating self-compassion means that we honor and accept our humanness. Things will not always go the way we want them to. We often encounter frustrations and losses. We make mistakes and bump up against our limitations, or fall short of our ideals. This is the human condition, a reality shared by us all. The more we open our heart to this reality instead of constantly fighting against it, the more we will be able to feel compassion for ourselves and all our fellow humans.

Research has shown that self-compassion greatly enhances emotional well-being. It boosts resilience, happiness, reduces anxiety and depression, and can even help maintain healthy lifestyle habits such as diet and exercise. Being both mindful and compassionate leads to greater ease and well-being in our daily lives. MSC can be learned by anyone. It’s the practice of recognizing moments of difficulty, and repeatedly evoking good will toward ourselves. It extends cultivation of that same desire beyond ourselves to all living beings to live happily and free from suffering.

In the weekly program, participants will learn through activities such as meditation, experiential exercises, short presentations, group discussion and home practices. Learning is mostly experiential and includes current theory and research on self-compassion. 

Schedule: 

8-week course from 6:00 - 8:30pm
2 sections: Thursdays from 12:00 - 2:30pm OR 6:00 - 8:30pm on 1/28, 2/4, 2/11, 2/18, 2/25, 3/3, 3/10, and 3/17
Retreat on Sunday March 6, 1:30 - 5:30pm

About the Instructors

Yaffa Maritz, LMHC is a co-founder of Listening Mothers and clinical director of both Listening Mothers and Reflective Parenting, two research based parenting programs. She is the founder and director of the Community of Mindful Parenting. Yaffa was born and trained in Israel as a clinical psychologist. She is also a licensed mental health counselor with advanced training in infant mental health. She is an advocate for the well-being of children and their families and served on several local and national boards that promote this agenda, including the Governor’s Commission for Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention. Yaffa believes that by supporting parents and creating nurturing communities for them, we can set the foundation for the positive growth of children’s social, emotional, and mental health. Yaffa participated in the Stanford yearlong teachers training program called CCT (Compassion Cultivation Training) that was offered   through CCare, and also completed the advanced training program in MSC (Mindful Self-Compassion) with Drs. Kristin Neff and Chris Germer. She is looking forward to working together with Elizabeth Lin and sharing the wisdom of this program with our community. 

Elizabeth H. B. Lin, MD, MPH.  Dr. Lin, a family medicine physician, is a clinical professor at the School of Medicine, University of Washington and an affiliate scientific investigator at the Group Health Research Institute. As a physician researcher, Dr. Lin is well-known for research on improving mind-body health in general medical settings. Elizabeth has had a daily meditation practice for more than 20 years.  She has trained extensively with leaders in mindfulness programs, and began teaching Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction 4 years ago. Dr. Lin recently trained with Drs. Chris Germer and Kristen Neff, to become a teacher in Mindful Self-Compassion. She is very much looking forward to co-teaching this course with Ms. Yaffa Maritz. 

Scholarships

If you are able to pay more, we encourage you to please consider donating to our Mindfulness Outreach Fund. This fund allows us to provide 50% and 100% scholarships to individuals working with children and families who would benefit from mindfulness training, but are unable to pay the full registration fee. If you would like to make a donation towards our scholarship fund, please visit http://giving.uw.edu/mindfulness.​

January 26, 2016 to March 15, 2016
Courses and Workshops
Elizabeth Lin, MD, MPH
Winter 2016 Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction
Tuesday evenings, 6:00 - 8:30pm with retreat on Sat 3/5 from 9:00am - 3:00pm  »  CCFW

You may view the class waiver here, which will be distributed, signed, and collected on the first day of class. Please review this note from Dr. Lin BEFORE registering to ensure that this class will be a proper fit for your needs.

Class Description

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a scientifically proven program developed by Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph.D. to reduce stress and increase well-being. It is flourishing worldwide. This 8 –week course combines contemplative practices based in Eastern philosophy, western psychology, and cutting-edge neuroscience.  Attitudes of kindness, acceptance and patience provide a foundation for the practices of sustained focus, self-regulation and self-exploration.  A greater sense of balance, choice and freedom is cultivated.

Benefits of MBSR: Participants have remarked, “Mindfulness has changed how I live and see the world, how I interact with others”. This course contribute to:

1. Reduced stress and chronic pain
2. Improved mood
3. Overcoming sleep problems
4. Decreased anxiety
5. Increased immunity
6. Enhanced resilience, joy, and compassion
7. Healthy aging

In this 8-week experiential course consisting of weekly classes, and home practices, participants will learn exercises to:

1. Increase awareness of body sensations (body scan)
2. Mindful movement and stretching (yoga)
3. Awareness of pleasant and unpleasant experiences
4. Awareness of thoughts and emotions
5. Increase compassion for ourselves and others
6. Latest research on mind-body response to stress and change
7. Practices to cultivate mindfulness throughout the day, living each moment to its fullest

Schedule: 8-week course, Tuesday evenings from 6:00 - 8:30pm with a retreat on Saturday 3/5 from 9:00am - 3:00pm 

Tuesday, January 26, 2016: 6:00-9:00pm (Waiver and pre-class questionnaires completed)
Tuesday, February 2, 2016: 6:00-8:30pm
Tuesday, February 9, 2016: 6:00-8:30pm
Tuesday, February 16, 2016: 6:00-8:30pm
Tuesday, February 23, 2016: 6:00-8:30pm
Tuesday, March 1, 2016: 6:00-8:30pm
Saturday, March 5, 2016: 9:00am - 3:00pm (Silent retreat)
Tuesday, March 8, 2016: 6:00-8:30pm
Tuesday, March 15, 2016: 6:00-8:30pm (Post-class questionnaires completed)

About the Instructor

The course will be taught by Elizabeth H. B. Lin, MD, MPH. Dr. Lin is a family medicine physician, clinical professor at the University of Washington School of Medicine, and an affiliate scientific investigator at the Group Health Research Institute. As a physician researcher, Dr. Lin is well-known for scientific studies on improving mental and behavioral health for patients in general medical settings. Elizabeth has trained with Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn, founder of the Center for Mindfulness at the University of Massachusetts  as well as other leading professors and teachers in this field. She has had a daily meditation practice for more than 20 years, and has taught MBSR for the last 4 years. Dr. Lin received her certification in the teaching of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction at the University of Massachusetts Center for Mindfulness.

"Dr. Lin is a wonderful, caring, respectful and well-prepared instructor and did a fantastic job teaching this class. I particularly appreciated her taking time to answer questions in a thoughtful way. This, along with the content of what she said, was most enlightening for me, because I have begun to pause and take more time in my own communications with other people." 

"Elizabeth is a welcoming and receptive instructor and communicated her own enthusiasm for a mindfulness approach to life in general. I liked how she used her own experience as a student of mindfulness over many years." 

"Elizabeth is wonderful. She walks the talk which is just as important as being the excellent MBSR instructor that she is." 

"Elizabeth is very thoughtful, non-judgmental, humble, and caring." 

Scholarships

If you are able to pay more, we encourage you to please consider donating to our Mindfulness Outreach Fund. This fund allows us to provide 50% and 100% scholarships to individuals working with children and families who would benefit from mindfulness training, but are unable to pay the full registration fee. If you would like to make a donation towards our scholarship fund, please visit http://giving.uw.edu/mindfulness.​

January 11, 2016
Courses and Workshops
Dr. Liliana Lengua
Nature & Nurturing: Parenting with Your Child's Temperament in Mind
6:30 - 8:30pm  »  CCFW

Registration is required (closes 1/11). Register here

Workshop Description

Is your child the one clinging to you at the door when you try to drop him off at a birthday party, too nervous to join the party? Or was your child the one that was so excited to get to the party that she darted into the street even after you just got done telling her to stay right by the car when she got out? Or did you not even make it to the party because your child was so frustrated and angry about having to wear a jacket that he broke down into a total crying and yelling fit?

And were you feeling self-conscious that other parents were viewing you as ineffective and not in control of your child? 

Some of these challenging behaviors from our children can stem from their temperament – the emotional and self-regulation characteristics that they are born with. Many children present challenging emotional and behavioral responses to every-day situations, and these experiences can be very stressful for parents and families. It’s not always clear what is the most effective way to deal with these behaviors – should a parent use more negative consequences? More rewards? Be more firm? More gentle? Pick your battles? Stick to your guns? More importantly, children can present these challenging behaviors for very different underlying reasons depending on their temperament, and parents can be more effective if they understand the source of their children’s reactions. Little if any parenting advice that is available to parents provides the critical understanding of the role of children’s temperament in shaping children’s behavior and our parenting. This presentation will provide an opportunity to learn about:

1. The sources of children's temperament or individual differences in their reactions.
2. How temperament can elicit less-than-ideal parenting from even the best of parents.
3. How to parent more effectively with children's temperament in mind.

About the Presenter

Liliana Lengua, Ph.D. is a mother of 3 (temperamentally unique) children, a child clinical psychologist, a professor of psychology at the University of Washington, and director of the UW Center for Child and Family Well-Being. She is internationally recognized for her research on children’s vulnerable and resilient responses to stress, demonstrating how parenting and children’s temperament contribute to children’s responses to stress. She has conducted 25 years of research on the interplay between children’s temperament and parenting. She is also recognized for her research on the effects of stress and disadvantage on parenting and children’s social-emotional development. She has been the principal investigator of several federally funded research projects and is the author of more than 70 published papers.

December 7, 2015
Free Public Lectures
Philip Zelazo, Ph.D.
Executive Function and the Developing Brain
7:00 - 8:30 pm  »  Kane Hall 120

Registration is FULL. You are welcome to come to Kane Hall the evening of the lecture, as there is a chance we may have some open seats. Doors will open at 6:30pm and non-ticket holders will be allowed to occupy any remaining seats at 6:55pm.

Click here for a summary for this lecture

Abstract: The deliberate control of thought, action, and emotion depends importantly on a set of attentional skills called executive function (EF) skills. EF skills support school readiness, academic success, socioemotional competence, physical and mental health, and other desirable developmental outcomes. This lecture discusses EF, its development in childhood, and effective ways to support this development. One example is mindfulness training—using age-appropriate activities to exercise children’s reflection on their moment-to-moment experiences. Mindfulness training may support the development of self-regulation by targeting top-down processes while modifying bottom-up influences (such as anxiety, stress, curiosity) to create conditions conducive to reflection.

Philip David Zelazo is currently the Nancy M. and John E. Lindahl Professor at the Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota. Professor Zelazo’s research has helped shape current scientific understanding of executive function and its development, including the key roles of reflection, rule use, hierarchical complexity, mindfulness, and emotion (hot versus cool EF). This work has led to the design of widely used standardized measures of EF skills and to the creation of effective interventions for promoting the healthy development of EF in early childhood. Professor Zelazo’s research has been honored by numerous awards, including a Boyd McCandless Young Scientist Award from the American Psychological Association (APA), and a Canada’s Top 40 Under 40 Award. He is editor of the two-volume Oxford Handbook of Developmental Psychology (2013), and the lead developer of the executive function measures for the NIH Toolbox.

Thank you to the generous sponsors of this event!

   

October 26, 2015
Courses and Workshops
Dr. Suzanne Kerns
Parenting with a Pound of Prevention and an Ounce of Cure
6:30 - 8:30pm  »  CCFW

Registration required (closes 10/25/15). Register here. Save $5 when you register before September 30!

Summary of Workshop 

Ideal for parents and caregivers with children between the ages of 3-16, participants will have an opportunity to identify personalized strategies to address common challenges with child behavior. Dr. Suzanne Kerns will provide some tips and tools for effective and positive discipline, including the most important tool – prevention! Then, participants will be provided a framework for understanding their child’s behavior and have a chance to come up with a personalized plan.

Goal 

The goal for this session is for participants to walk away with fresh ideas and a game plan for managing the challenges we all encounter when raising children.

About the Presenter 

Dr. Suzanne Kerns is a clinical psychologist and Associate Professor at the University of Washington. She has been a trainer for the Triple P Positive Parenting Program for 14 years and taught a graduate-level course on Effective Parenting for six years. In addition to research and teaching pursuits, she regularly has an opportunity to practice her skills as she is a mother to a preschooler and a ‘tween’.

October 19, 2015 to November 30, 2015
Courses and Workshops
Richard Berger, MD
Adopting Mindfulness and Compassion Practices in a Busy Schedule
Monday evenings, 6:30 - 9:00pm  »  CCFW

Registration required (closes 10/18/15). Register here

Course Description: Many of us wish to start a mindfulness practice but do not know how to work it into our busy schedules. Our schedules may be too erratic and hectic to take a regular time out.  Yet there are many mindful practices that can be worked into our everyday lives and that take no extra time at all.  Others can be accommodated in 10-20 minutes a day.  These practices can still make major differences in our attitudes and quality of life and provide major benefits.

This 4-class course will provide:

Course Goals:

•    Instruction and practice in working mindful practice into your everyday activities

•    Instruction and practice in calming, compassion and awareness expanding

•    Information on the scientific basis of the above practices

•    Provide a sound basis for further growth in awareness and compassion

 

 

Course Dates: Four 2.5 hour classes every other week from 6:30 - 9:00pm

Oct 19, Nov 2, Nov 16, and Nov 30

Optional all day retreat Nov 14

Class size: 10 - 25 participants

Please note: CCFW requries a minimum of 10 participants to run this class. If we must cancel this class due to under enrollment, you will be notified no later than 1 week prior to the start date and you will receive a full refund. 

About the Instructor

Richard (Rick) E. Berger, MD, Professor Emeritus in the Medical School at the University of Washington, is the primary teacher of Mindfulness NW. He received his undergraduate education and medical degree from The University of Chicago. He received his certification in the teaching of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction at the University of Massachusetts Center for Mindfulness  and received a Certification in Mindfulness Facilitation from the Mindful Awareness Research Center at the University of California in Los Angeles. Rick has taught Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Mindful Awareness Practices (MAPS) classes at the University of Washington Hospital, the University of Washington Intramural Activities Center and the Center for Child and Family Well-being. He also holds certificates to teach mindfulness to children and adolescents from Inner Kids and Mindful Schools and teaches mindfulness in the Seattle Public Schools. His ongoing practice includes daily meditation, yoga, silent retreats and continuing education in mindfulness and related areas.

"The best part of the class was interacting with Dr. Berger, experiencing his good heart, the daily practice of meditating, and the frequent practice of mindfulness during each day. As a result of the class activities, I feel much more connected to myself, more calm and peaceful, happy."

"I like the way Rick led the class with gentleness and patience. He led us, but at the same time made it seem he was on the journey with us."

"Rick did a great job at teaching the material and was welcoming and accessible and made it seem so easy. I appreciated his humor too!" 

"Rick Berger was wise, present, patience, funny, and accepting."

"I enjoyed Richard's cheerful patient attitude."

"Rick was great- he made the class very safe."

October 11, 2015 to November 15, 2015
Courses and Workshops
Ann Hollar, M.Ed.
Fall 2015 Mindfulness 101 for Teens
4:00-5:15pm  »  CCFW

Registration is full. Add your name to the waitlist here

Is your teen driven to distraction? Overwhelmed with keeping up socially on-line and off? Stressed about homework? Caught up in negative thinking? In this six week course we will touch on many aspects of mindfulness that will help your teen navigate these exciting and complex high school years. This course is intended for high school aged teenagers (14-19 years old). Class size will range between 10 and 20 students. 

Last year, 100% of teens who took this class at CCFW said they would recommend it to a friend. Mindfulness helped...

  • 100% of the class calm down when upset or stressed
  • 93% be better listeners
  • 79% make better decisions
  • 71% avoid fights or arguments

After taking Mindfulness 101, teens said: 

"I use at least one thing I learned in the mindfulness class every day, and it's been very helpful to keep my mind organized and keep myself centered. The breathing exercises help me relax in stressful situations."

"Mindfulness helps me focus and relax at the same time. The class was great since it was all high school students with the same pressures of homework, tests and friends. The lessons and meditation help me find calm and step back to see the bigger picture."

"I learned how to listen to others way better (friends, family, teachers). The breathing exercise also helps me fall asleep."

"Life can be overwhelming and this helps a lot."

"Mindfulness has helped me put more effort into trying to discern what is real vs. imagined."

"If I just focus on one thing at a time I am better off."

"I was pretty upset going to a class at school, and I used mindful walking to calm down."

"Bad grade on a quiz - I acknowledged sadness but didn't let it hold me back. Missed a shot in soccer - moved past it and scored."

"Ann's class made learning about mediation not only relatable but also enjoyable. I looked forward to going to her class as well as employing her methods in circumstances that I normally would have been unsure of what to do in. Working with Ann was a pleasure, and I look forward to continuing the use of mediation in stressful and foreign circumstances. Thank you Ann!"

Tentative Schedule

Week 1 October 11: Brain, Body, Breath - Understanding the basics

Week 2 October 18: Home Sweet Home - Creating a sense of ease within ourselves

Week 3 October 25: Driven to Distraction - Learning how to focus attention

Week 4 November 1: Making Sense of your Senses - Slowing down and noticing

Week 5 November 8: Riding the Storm - Being with, not thrown, by strong emotions

Week 6 November 15: Giving Thanks - The power of gratitude and kindness

About the Instructor

Ann Hollar is a mindfulness instructor in Seattle. She has a M. Ed from the University of Washington, focusing her thesis on “Mindfulness in Education:  The Secular Intersection of Buddhism and Neuroscience.” She currently teaches mindfulness to students in both public and private elementary, middle and high schools. She has been trained in both the MindUp and Mindful Schools curricula and has recently completed Mindful Schools Year-Long Instructor Certification Program. Her personal integration of mindfulness is constantly being kept alive via interactions with her three tween and teenaged boys.

"Thank you for creating a safe, nurturing space for our children to establish their own practice of mindfulness and appreciation. Through your course, we saw a gentle shift as our kids practiced noticing their thoughts, focusing their attention, and expanding their capacity for gratitude. Having "homework" helped them naturally establish a practice that carried over long after your classes were complete. Thank you for laying the groundwork for a practice that can help them through the inevitable stress of adolescence and beyond."

"Our daughter loved learning ways to relax and de -stress from Ann. She creates a safe, compassionate community where our daughter found inner peace."  

"Students are experiencing higher levels of stress and Ann's class offers strategies and alternatives which allow them to feel less anxious, more balanced and more capable of managing the stress." 

October 6, 2015 to November 24, 2015
Courses and Workshops
Richard Berger, MD
Cultivating Happiness: A Mindfulness-Based Path
Tuesday evenings, 6:30 - 9:00pm  »  CCFW

Registration required (closes 10/5/15). Register here

This class is intended to be an educational class and not therapy for depression. In light of this, the instructor recommends you read this self-screening questionnaire to determine whether now is a proper time for you to take the course.

Course Description: Everyone in the world wants to be happy. Happiness is an elusive and complicated emotion.  It is impermanent. Yet we have input into our own happiness and even the happiness of others. By developing our awareness of what makes ourselves and others happy, we can make conscious decisions about where to concentrate our efforts to be happier. Furthermore, happiness can improve our productivity, creativity, and energy.

Neuroscience tells us that our brains are changed by what we think and what we do. We can purposefully and skillfully change our own brains and minds. In this series of classes we will systematically learn a mindfulness-based approach to becoming more aware and happy. Read more about why happiness is good for your health in this article on the Greater Good website

Course Goals:

•    To become aware of scientifically proven factors in happiness and how happiness is contagious

•    To become more aware of what makes experience pleasant and unpleasant

•    We will become proficient in practices that can mold our brains, minds, and consciousness to allow more happiness in our lives and the lives of others

•    To become more compassionate of the unhappiness of ourselves and those around us

•    To increase our happiness and equanimity

The Happiness class material has been inspired by several sources including Mindful Compassion by Paul Gilbert and Choden, Zen Heart by Ezra Bayda, One small Step can Change your Life by Robert Maurer, works by Jon Kabat-Zinn, the Headspace Happiness Series, Seeing that Frees by Rob Burba, Greater Good sources and others. Increased well-being has been shown to be a by product of practicing mindfulness and compassion. In this course, specific practices which are aimed at increasing happiness will be emphasized. Increased happiness has been shown to improve well-being, work productivity, creativeness and the happiness of others. Happiness is not a selfish undertaking but creates happiness in those around you as well. Homework will include informal daily practices and short formal practice sessions. Emphasis will be placed on awareness of the moments of happiness in our life, overcoming negative bias, and developing a consistent program conducive to your happiness and those around you, and dispelling disproven myths about happiness.

Course Dates: 8 week course of 8 weekly 2.5 hour classes

Oct 6, Oct 13 Oct 20, Oct 27, Nov 3, Nov 10, Nov 17 , Nov 24

All day retreat Nov 14

Daily meditation and life practice at highly recommended.

Class size: 10 - 25 participants

Please note: CCFW requries a minimum of 10 participants to run this class. If we must cancel this class due to under enrollment, you will be notified no later than 1 week prior to the start date and you will receive a full refund. 

About the Instructor

Richard (Rick) E. Berger, MD, Professor Emeritus in the Medical School at the University of Washington, is the primary teacher of Mindfulness NW. He received his undergraduate education and medical degree from The University of Chicago. He received his certification in the teaching of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction at the University of Massachusetts Center for Mindfulness  and received a Certification in Mindfulness Facilitation from the Mindful Awareness Research Center at the University of California in Los Angeles. Rick has taught Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Mindful Awareness Practices (MAPS) classes at the University of Washington Hospital, the University of Washington Intramural Activities Center and the Center for Child and Family Well-being. He also holds certificates to teach mindfulness to children and adolescents from Inner Kids and Mindful Schools and teaches mindfulness in the Seattle Public Schools. His ongoing practice includes daily meditation, yoga, silent retreats and continuing education in mindfulness and related areas.

"The best part of the class was interacting with Dr. Berger, experiencing his good heart, the daily practice of meditating, and the frequent practice of mindfulness during each day. As a result of the class activities, I feel much more connected to myself, more calm and peaceful, happy."

"I like the way Rick led the class with gentleness and patience. He led us, but at the same time made it seem he was on the journey with us."

"Rick did a great job at teaching the material and was welcoming and accessible and made it seem so easy. I appreciated his humor too!" 

"Rick Berger was wise, present, patience, funny, and accepting."

"I enjoyed Richard's cheerful patient attitude."

"Rick was great- he made the class very safe."

September 23, 2015 to November 19, 2015
Courses and Workshops
Elizabeth H. B. Lin, MD, MPH
Fall 2015 Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Course
2 sections: Wednesday and Thursday evenings 6:00 - 8:30pm  »  CCFW

Registration is full

You may view the class waiver here, which will be distributed, signed, and collected on the first day of class. Please review this note from Dr. Lin BEFORE registering to ensure that this class will be a proper fit for your needs.

Class Description

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a scientifically proven program developed by Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph.D. to reduce stress and increase well-being. It is flourishing worldwide. This 8 –week course combines contemplative practices based in Eastern philosophy, western psychology, and cutting-edge neuroscience.  Attitudes of kindness, acceptance and patience provide a foundation for the practices of sustained focus, self-regulation and self-exploration.  A greater sense of balance, choice and freedom is cultivated.

Benefits of MBSR: Participants have remarked, “Mindfulness has changed how I live and see the world, how I interact with others”. This course contributes to:

1. Reduced stress and chronic pain

2. Improved mood

3. Overcoming sleep problems

4. Decreased anxiety

5. Increased immunity

6. Enhanced resilience, joy, and compassion

7. Healthy aging

In this 8-week experiential course consisting of weekly classes, and home practices, participants will learn exercises to:

1. Increase awareness of body sensations (body scan)

2. Mindful movement and stretching (yoga)

3. Awareness of pleasant and unpleasant experiences

4. Awareness of thoughts and emotions

5. Increase compassion for ourselves and others

6. Latest research on mind-body response to stress and change

7. Practices to cultivate mindfulness throughout the day, living each moment to its fullest

Schedule: 8-week course from 6:00 - 8:30pm (except for class 1, which will end at 9pm)

Wednesday section: Sept 23 (6-9pm), Sept 30, Oct 7, Oct 14, Oct 28, Nov 4, Nov 11, Nov 18

Thursday section: Sept 24 (6-9pm), Oct 1, Oct 8, Oct 15, Oct 29, Nov 5, Nov 12, Nov 19

Retreat on Sun Nov 8, 9-3 pm (both sections)

About the Instructor

The course will be taught by Elizabeth H. B. Lin, MD, MPH. Dr. Lin is a family medicine physician, clinical professor at the University of Washington School of Medicine, and an affiliate scientific investigator at the Group Health Research Institute. As a physician researcher, Dr. Lin is well-known for scientific studies on improving mental and behavioral health for patients in general medical settings. Elizabeth has trained with Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn, founder of the Center for Mindfulness at the University of Massachusetts  as well as other leading professors and teachers in this field. She has had a daily meditation practice for more than 20 years, and has taught MBSR for the last 4 years. Dr. Lin received her certification in the teaching of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction at the University of Massachusetts Center for Mindfulness.

"Dr. Lin is a wonderful, caring, respectful and well-prepared instructor and did a fantastic job teaching this class. I particularly appreciated her taking time to answer questions in a thoughtful way. This, along with the content of what she said, was most enlightening for me, because I have begun to pause and take more time in my own communications with other people." 

"Elizabeth is a welcoming and receptive instructor and communicated her own enthusiasm for a mindfulness approach to life in general. I liked how she used her own experience as a student of mindfulness over many years."

"Elizabeth is wonderful. She walks the talk which is just as important as being the excellent MBSR instructor that she is."

"Elizabeth is very thoughtful, non-judgmental, humble, and caring." 

July 20, 2015
Courses and Workshops
Dr. Liliana Lengua
Mindfulness in Parenting: Creating More "Best Parenting Moments"
6:30 - 8:30 pm  »  CCFW

Resource Links: 

http://store.positivediscipline.com/parents.html

https://www.loveandlogic.com/parents

http://www.cdc.gov/parents/essentials/index.html

Dr. Liliana Lengua, Child Psychologist, Psychology Professor and Director of the Center for Child and Family Well-Being will lead this training on evidence-based mindful parenting, including tools for bringing mindfulness into your everyday interactions with your child.

Using best practices in parenting is challenging for most parents, particularly when families are experiencing stress or disruptions from economic or work challenges, family conflict, mental health issues, divorce, bereavement, or other stressful life circumstances, or when dealing with temperamentally challenging children. Parents who can adopt mindfulness practices might be better able to engage in effective parenting and positive interactions with their children. Dr. Lengua will interweave mindfulness practices with best parenting practices that can be used in every-day interactions between parents and children to enhance parents’ effectiveness and satisfaction in interacting with their children.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand best parenting practices of warmth, responsiveness and consistency
  • Use mindfulness practices to increase use of best parenting practices
  • Use mindfulness practices to be present, calm and wise-minded
  • Combine specific parenting and mindfulness practices when interacting with children.

Liliana Lengua, Ph.D. is a mother of 3 children, a child clinical psychologist, a professor of psychology at the University of Washington, and director of the UW Center for Child and Family Well-Being. She is an internationally recognized expert on children’s vulnerable and resilient responses to stress, demonstrating how parenting and children’s temperament contributes to children’s unique responses to stress. She is also recognized for her research on the effects of stress and disadvantage on parenting and children’s social-emotional development, and has developed and evidence-based parenting program infused with mindfulness practices to enhance parenting effectiveness. She has been the principal investigator of several federally funded research projects and is the author of over 50 published papers

April 17, 2015 to April 18, 2015
Special Events
Biennial Mindfulness Research Conference
Mindful Families, Schools & Communities: Research-to-Practice Promoting Child Well-being
April 17 from 1:00 - 8:30pm & April 18 from 8:00am - 5:00pm  »  Bell Harbor International Conference Center

Registration required (closes 4/13/15). Early-bird pricing until 1/15/15. Discounts for students and poster presenters. Please register here.

April 17, 2015
Special Events
Dr. Adele Diamond
Research Insights into Promoting the Well-being of Children and their Families
7:00 - 8:30 pm  »  Bell Harbor International Conference Center

Registration required. Please register here

Presentation Slides

Adele Diamond is the Tier 1 Canada Research Chair Professor of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, BC, Canada.  One of the pioneers in the field of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, Adele is at the forefront of research on executive functions. Executive functions include 'thinking outside the box' (cognitive flexibility), mentally relating ideas and facts (working memory), and giving considered responses rather than impulsive ones, resisting temptations and staying focused (inhibitory control, including selective attention). These abilities are crucial for problem-solving, creativity, reasoning, and success in all life’s aspects. Adele studies how executive functions are affected by biological factors (e.g., genes and neurochemistry) and by environmental ones (e.g., impaired by stress or improved by interventions) especially in children. She has made discoveries that have improved treatment for medical disorders (PKU and ADHD) and impacted early education, improving the lives of thousands of children. Her work has shown that executive functions can be improved at any age, even in the very young. Recently Adele has turned her attention to the possible roles of traditional activities, such as music and dance, in improving executive functions, academic outcomes, and mental health. See Dr. Diamond's recent TEDx talk: Turning some Ideas on their Head 

Abstract

The most important predictor of the success of an early childhood program, psychotherapy, or a parent-child relationship is that the child feel that his/her teacher, therapist, or parent really, truly cares about him or her. Your love -- your openness to truly listen; being there for a child when he or she needs you -- is more important than your knowledge or skill or doing the textbook-perfect thing. So relax; you don’t need to have read all the books or have the perfect methodology. And, you can do the textbook-perfect thing, but if it doesn’t come from the right place, it will not have the desired result. 

There is a bi-directional relationship between the prefrontal cortex of the brain and stress. Stress impairs the functioning of prefrontal cortex but prefrontal cortex can help us handle stress. When you feel stressed, putting feelings into words produces therapeutic effects on the brain – it gets prefrontal cortex more involved. Evidence shows the fundamental interrelatedness of the different parts of ourselves, and of each of us to one another. Physical, social, emotional, and cognitive health are all fundamentally interconnected. Prefrontal cortex and executive functions are the first to suffer, and suffer disproportionately, if we are sad, stressed, lonely, sleep-deprived, or not physically fit. (You may have noticed that when you are stressed or ill you cannot think as clearly or exercise as good self-control.) Conversely, we show better executive functions when we are happy, feel socially supported, and are physically fit. We need to nurture the whole child; our children need to do things that they are passionately interested in and which bring them joy, they need to feel they are in supportive community they can count on, and their bodies need to be strong and healthy. 

Click here for Dr. Diamond's full biography and abstract

Full Conference Details

Please visit http://depts.washington.edu/ccfwb/content/2015-mindfulness-research-conference for full details.

Click here for conference agenda.

April 15, 2015 to June 3, 2015
Courses and Workshops
Richard Berger, MD
Learning to Meditate
6:30 - 9:00pm  »  CCFW

Registration required. Please register here

Class Description

This class will focus on instruction in formal meditation practice. Most of the instruction will be on a beginner level with no previous experience required. Guided meditations with be generally followed by discussion and experiential inquiry. Several types of meditation instruction will be offered: narrow focused attention meditation, wide focused meditation, loving-kindness meditation, and walking meditation. General discussions on the neurophysiology and scientific basis of meditation will be provided.

Objectives: At the end of this course, participants will be better able to: 

1. Continue a home practice of meditation.

2. Understand the scientific basis of meditation on a beginning level.

3. Practice several forms of meditation and understand the potential results and basic neurophysiology of each.

Class size: 10 - 25 participants

Please note: CCFW requries a minimum of 10 participants to run this class. If we must cancel this class due to under enrollment, you will be notified no later than 1 week prior to the start date and you will receive a full refund. 

Class Schedule

4-Class Sessions: Select Wednesdays from 6:30 - 9:00 pm between April 15 and June 3, 2015 at CCFW

Daylong Retreat: Saturday May 16, 2015 (time and location TBA)

Wednesday, April 15, 2015: 6:30 - 9:00 pm 

Wednesday, May 6, 2015: 6:30 - 9:00 pm 

Saturday, May 16, 2015: TBA

Wednesday, May 20, 2015: 6:30 - 9:00 pm 

Wednesday, June 3, 2015: 6:30 - 9:00 pm 

About the Instructor

Richard (Rick) E. Berger, MD, Professor Emeritus in the Medical School at the University of Washington, is the primary teacher of Mindfulness NW. He received his undergraduate education and medical degree from The University of Chicago. He received his certification in the teaching of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction at the University of Massachusetts Center for Mindfulness  and received a Certification in Mindfulness Facilitation from the Mindful Awareness Research Center at the University of California in Los Angeles. Rick has taught Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Mindful Awareness Practices (MAPS) classes at the University of Washington Hospital, the University of Washington Intramural Activities Center and the Center for Child and Family Well-being. He also holds certificates to teach mindfulness to children and adolescents from Inner Kids and Mindful Schools and teaches mindfulness in the Seattle Public Schools. His ongoing practice includes daily meditation, yoga, silent retreats and continuing education in mindfulness and related areas.

April 8, 2015 to May 27, 2015
Courses and Workshops
Dr. Richard Berger
Mindfulness in Everyday Activities
6:30 - 9:00pm  »  CCFW

Registration required. Please register here

Class Description

This class is open to all people who have a busy schedule and want to incorporate mindfulness into their daily life. We will use the practice of small steps to gradually allow mindfulness to enrich our lives using methods applied to everyday experience that will require a minimum amount of extra time. The purpose of this approach is to integrate mindful awareness into activities you already engage in, rather than “adding” mindfulness practices to an already busy schedule. We will also introduce practice techniques that develop the direction of the mind toward more positivity and connection to experience. Participants will have the option to practice and experience mindful meditation, but as an optional support to the experience of everyday life.

Objectives: At the end of this course, participants will be better able to: 

1. Develop a mindfulness practice that permeates everyday experience and allows for perpetual growth, while also preparing one for a meditation practice should one desire.

2. Be able to practice several techniques that promote a more positive attitude and self-compassion towards oneself and others.

3. Become familiar with the concept and science of taking very small steps to make significant changes in one’s life.

4. Become more adept at allowing and making steady progress towards growth and fulfillment of our intentions without guilt.

Class size: 10 - 25 participants

Please note: CCFW requries a minimum of 10 participants to run this class. If we must cancel this class due to under enrollment, you will be notified no later than 1 week prior to the start date and you will receive a full refund. 

Class Schedule

4-Class Sessions: Select Wednesdays from 6:30 - 9:00 pm between April 8 and May 27, 2015 at CCFW

Daylong Retreat: Saturday May 16, 2015 (time and location TBA)

Wednesday, April 8, 2015: 6:30 - 9:00 pm 

Wednesday, April 22, 2015: 6:30 - 9:00 pm 

Wednesday, May 13, 2015: 6:30 - 9:00 pm 

Saturday, May 16, 2015: TBA

Wednesday, May 27, 2015: 6:30 - 9:00 pm 

About the Instructor

Richard (Rick) E. Berger, MD, Professor Emeritus in the Medical School at the University of Washington, is the primary teacher of Mindfulness NW. He received his undergraduate education and medical degree from The University of Chicago. He received his certification in the teaching of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction at the University of Massachusetts Center for Mindfulness  and received a Certification in Mindfulness Facilitation from the Mindful Awareness Research Center at the University of California in Los Angeles. Rick has taught Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Mindful Awareness Practices (MAPS) classes at the University of Washington Hospital, the University of Washington Intramural Activities Center and the Center for Child and Family Well-being. He also holds certificates to teach mindfulness to children and adolescents from Inner Kids and Mindful Schools and teaches mindfulness in the Seattle Public Schools. His ongoing practice includes daily meditation, yoga, silent retreats and continuing education in mindfulness and related areas.

March 31, 2015 to May 19, 2015
Courses and Workshops
Dr. Elizabeth Lin
Spring 2015 Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction 8-Week Course
6:00 - 8:30pm  »  CCFW

Registration required. Please register here

You may view the class waiver here, which will be distributed, signed, and collected on the first day of class. Please review this note from Dr. Lin BEFORE registering to ensure that this class will be a proper fit for your needs.

Class Description

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a scientifically proven program developed by Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph.D. to reduce stress and increase well-being. It is flourishing worldwide. This 8 –week course combines contemplative practices based in Eastern philosophy, western psychology, and cutting-edge neuroscience.  Attitudes of kindness, acceptance and patience provide a foundation for the practices of sustained focus, self-regulation and self-exploration.  A greater sense of balance, choice and freedom is cultivated.

Benefits of MBSR: Participants have remarked, “Mindfulness has changed how I live and see the world, how I interact with others”. This course contribute to:

1. Reduced stress and chronic pain

2. Improved mood

3. Overcoming sleep problems

4. Decreased anxiety

5. Increased immunity

6. Enhanced resilience, joy, and compassion

7. Healthy aging

In this 8-week experiential course consisting of weekly classes, and home practices, participants will learn exercises to:

1. Increase awareness of body sensations (body scan)

2. Mindful movement and stretching (yoga)

3. Awareness of pleasant and unpleasant experiences

4. Awareness of thoughts and emotions

5. Increase compassion for ourselves and others

6. Latest research on mind-body response to stress and change

7. Practices to cultivate mindfulness throughout the day, living each moment to its fullest

About the Instructor

The course will be taught by Elizabeth H. B. Lin, MD, MPH. Dr. Lin is a family medicine physician, clinical professor at the University of Washington School of Medicine, and an affiliate scientific investigator at the Group Health Research Institute. As a physician researcher, Dr. Lin is well-known for scientific studies on improving mental and behavioral health for patients in general medical settings. Elizabeth has trained with Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn, founder of the Center for Mindfulness at U of Massachusetts, as well as other leading professors and teachers in this field. She has had a daily meditation practice for more than 20 years, and has taught MBSR for the last 4 years.

March 26, 2015 to May 14, 2015
Courses and Workshops
Yaffa Maritz, LMHC and Elizabeth Lin, MD, MPH
Mindful Self-Compassion 8-Week Course
11:00am - 1:00pm or 6:30pm - 8:30pm  »  CCFW

Registration required. Please register here for the morning section or here for the evening section

Mindful Self-Compassion or “MSC” is an empirically-supported 8-week training program developed by Drs. Chris Germer and Kristin Neff.  It helps participants cultivate the mental and emotional habit of mindful self-compassion by learning the process of infusing our moment-to-moment experience with kindness, especially when we feel frustrated, hurt, inadequate, or overwhelmed. Mindful self-compassion is the first step in emotional healing—being able to be-friend oneself, turn inwardly and acknowledge our difficult thoughts and feelings with a spirit of openness, curiosity and love, rather than self-judgment, or self-criticism.

Perhaps most importantly, cultivating self-compassion means that we honor and accept our humanness. Things will not always go the way we want them to. We often encounter frustrations and losses. We make mistakes and bump up against our limitations, or fall short of our ideals. This is the human condition, a reality shared by us all. The more we open our heart to this reality instead of constantly fighting against it, the more we will be able to feel compassion for ourselves and all our fellow humans.

Research has shown that self-compassion greatly enhances emotional well-being. It boosts resilience, happiness, reduces anxiety and depression, and can even help maintain healthy lifestyle habits such as diet and exercise. Being both mindful and compassionate leads to greater ease and well-being in our daily lives. MSC can be learned by anyone. It’s the practice of recognizing moments of difficulty, and repeatedly evoking good will toward ourselves. It extends cultivation of that same desire beyond ourselves to all living beings to live happily and free from suffering.

In the weekly program, participants will learn through activities such as meditation, experiential exercises, short presentations, group discussion and home practices. Learning is mostly experiential and includes current theory and research on self-compassion. 

About the Instructors

Yaffa Maritz, LMHC is a co-founder of Listening Mothers and clinical director of both Listening Mothers and Reflective Parenting, two research based parenting programs. She is the founder and director of the Community of Mindful Parenting. Yaffa was born and trained in Israel as a clinical psychologist. She is also a licensed mental health counselor with advanced training in infant mental health. She is an advocate for the well-being of children and their families and served on several local and national boards that promote this agenda, including the Governor’s Commission for Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention. Yaffa believes that by supporting parents and creating nurturing communities for them, we can set the foundation for the positive growth of children’s social, emotional, and mental health. Yaffa participated in the Stanford yearlong teachers training program called CCT (Compassion Cultivation Training) that was offered   through CCare, and also completed the advanced training program in MSC (Mindful Self-Compassion) with Drs. Kristin Neff and Chris Germer. She is looking forward to working together with Elizabeth Lin and sharing the wisdom of this program with our community. 

Elizabeth H. B. Lin, MD, MPH.  Dr. Lin, a family medicine physician, is a clinical professor at the School of Medicine, University of Washington and an affiliate scientific investigator at the Group Health Research Institute. As a physician researcher, Dr. Lin is well-known for research on improving mind-body health in general medical settings. Elizabeth has had a daily meditation practice for more than 20 years.  She has trained extensively with leaders in mindfulness programs, and began teaching Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction 4 years ago. Dr. Lin recently trained with Drs. Chris Germer and Kristen Neff, to become a teacher in Mindful Self-Compassion. She is very much looking forward to co-teaching this course with Ms. Yaffa Maritz. 

March 6, 2015 to April 25, 2015
Professional Events
Christa Turksma, DRS
Improving Classroom Learning Environments by Cultivating Awareness and Resilience in Education (CARE)
Fridays (3/6 and 3/20) from 5 - 8:30p and Saturdays (3/7, 3/21, and 4/25) from 8:30a - 3:30p  »  CCFW

Registration is required (closes 3/5/15). Please register here.

Group rates: 
Schools that register 3 or 4 teachers can receive 15% off the listed fees
Schools that register 5+ teachers can receive 25% off the listed fees
Please e-mail mindful@uw.edu for a discount code

Co-leaders: Rebecca Cortes, Ph.D. and Ann Hollar, M.Ed.

Course consists of two half-day training sessions, two full-day training sessions, and a follow-up booster session. 

CARE (Cultivating Awareness and Resilience in Education) is a research based professional development program.  It was developed at the Garrison Institute by Patricia (Tish) Jennings, Associate Professor of Elementary Education at the Curry School of Education, VA, Richard C Brown, an educator  and  founder of the Contemplative Education Department at Naropa  University and Christa Turksma, a clinical psychologist and former elementary school principal.
 

Care is designed to teach teachers stress reducing techniques and ways to better understand and manage their emotions so they can create and maintain supportive learning environments, reduce burnout and attrition, and build strong relationships with their students to promote positive academic and behavioral outcomes.

Watch "Why CARE for Teachers Matters."

January 20, 2015 to March 17, 2015
Courses and Workshops
Erin B. Bernau, MSW, LICSW
Listening Mothers™ 8-Week Series
Tuesday mornings, 10:00-11:30am (no class 2/17)  »  CCFW
Pricing is $150 for the series (scholarships are available)
No pre-requisites, though moms do attend the class with their baby and babies should be under six months of age at the beginning of the class.
 
Listening Mothers™ 8-Week Series
  • Mindful based skills to help reduce stress and encourage balance
  • An environment to discover your own inner wisdom
  • Skilled professionals & mindfully trained facilitators
  • Parent & child self-awareness with a focus on self-regulation, self-compassion and parent and child emotional development
  • Emphasis on the importance of parent/child attachment
  • Parental confidence and empowerment
  • A community of like-minded parents who aspire to be the best parents they can be and are willing to embark on the parenting journey with an open mind, curiosity and willingness to explore
Program Goals
  • Better child/parent self-awareness
  • Healthier parent/child attachment
  • Parental confidence and empowerment
  • Promotion of thoughtful, respectful, compassionate, and well-adjusted children and adults

Curriculum

Week 1: Introduction to the four corners of the Listening Mothers™ curriculum; self-compassion, self-regulation, secure attachment and mindfulness.

Week 2: Discuss baby's emotional development, understand your child’s unique character, explore the demands of motherhood, learn ways to cope with different temperaments.

Week 3: Discuss the concept of ‘falling in love with baby’. Learn how babies communicate and explore the importance of secure attachment.

Week 4: Discuss role models, previous relationships and family experiences, talk about emotional development and practice skills to self-regulate.

Week 5: Discuss your own family and the influence on your parenting style. We will also explore the concept of love.

Weeks 6: Discuss the impact of baby on your relationship, practice listening and understand the importance of modeling intimacy.

Weeks 7: Evaluate the concept and importance of vulnerability, intimacy and gratitude. Discuss maintaining healthy communication. We will look at how mindful based stress reduction skills help overcome hurdles in relationships.

Week 8: Discuss circle of security, separation and transition as your baby grows.

About the Instructor: 
Erin B. Bernau, MSW, LICSW

I earned my Master's Degree in Social Work from the University of Washington and have worked extensively with families over the past fourteen years. I have worked as a Child Placement Specialist at Amara Parenting and Adoption Services, as well as having done extensive work in the field of children's grief and loss through Hospice of Seattle and Evergreen Healthcare's Bereavement Services. After having my own children, I became interested in the adjustment to parenthood and am committed to supporting families as they make this transition. I completed a program in Infant Observation through COR Northwest Family Development Center. I work as a parent educator at Seattle Central College's Parent Child Center and at Lakewood Cooperative Preschool. I am also a parent coach with Grow Parenting. Having participated in Listening Mothers with my own baby, I know firsthand how helpful and illuminating this experience can be for a new mom.
January 7, 2015 to March 4, 2015
Courses and Workshops
Richard Berger, MD
Winter 2015 Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction 8-Week Course (Wednesdays)
Wednesdays from 6:30-9pm with a retreat on Saturday February 21 from 9:15am-5pm  »  CCFW

Registration is required (closes 1/6/15). Please register here.

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a program originally designed over thirty years ago by Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph.D. The course has a basis in eastern psychology but is very applicable to modern secular life. Mindfulness is the practice of sustained focus, self-regulation, self-exploration, and self-liberation with an accepting, open and kind attitude.

Benefits of MBSR: Common outcomes include:

1. Calmness and expanded awareness
2. Increased brain growth and function in areas of emotional control and executive function
3. Decreased stress
4. Improved self-image, emotional regulation, and concentration
5. Less anxiety

More details on MBSR can be found at http://www.mindfulnessnw.com/what-is-mbsr/ 
You can also read more about recent research findings on MBSR at Science Daily

The course will be taught by Rick Berger, MD. Dr. Berger is a Professor Emeritus of the University of Washington School of Medicine, Certified Mindfulness Facilitator from UCLA, and a Certified Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction teacher from the University of Massachusetts.

January 5, 2015 to March 2, 2015
Courses and Workshops
Elizabeth H. B. Lin, MD, MPH
Winter 2015 Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction 8-Week Course (Mondays)
Mondays from 6-8:30pm with a retreat on Saturday February 21 from 8:30-3:30pm  »  CCFW

Registration is required (closes 1/4/15). Please review this note from Dr. Lin before registering to ensure this course will be a proper fit for your needs. Register here.

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a scientifically proven program developed by Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph.D. to reduce stress and increase well-being. It is flourishing worldwide. This 8 –week course combines contemplative practices based in Eastern philosophy, western psychology, and cutting-edge neuroscience.  Attitudes of kindness, acceptance and patience provide a foundation for the practices of sustained focus, self-regulation and self-exploration.  A greater sense of balance, choice and freedom is cultivated.

Benefits of MBSR: Participants have remarked, “Mindfulness has changed how I live and see the world, how I interact with others”. This course contribute to:

1. Reduced stress and chronic pain
2. Improved mood
3. Overcoming sleep problems
4. Decreased anxiety
5. Increased immunity
6. Enhanced resilience, joy, and compassion
7. Healthy aging

In this 8-week experiential course consisting of weekly classes, and home practices, participants will learn exercises to:

1. Increase awareness of body sensations (body scan)
2. Mindful movement and stretching (yoga)
3. Awareness of pleasant and unpleasant experiences
4. Awareness of thoughts and emotions
5. Increase compassion for ourselves and others
6. Latest research on mind-body response to stress and change
7. Practices to cultivate mindfulness throughout the day, living each moment to its fullest

The course will be taught by Elizabeth H. B. Lin, MD, MPH. Dr. Lin is a family medicine physician, clinical professor at the University of Washington School of Medicine, and an affiliate scientific investigator at the Group Health Research Institute. As a physician researcher, Dr. Lin is well-known for scientific studies on improving mental and behavioral health for patients in general medical settings. Elizabeth has trained with Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn, founder of the Center for Mindfulness at U of Massachusetts, as well as other leading professors and teachers in this field. She has had a daily meditation practice for more than 20 years, and has taught MBSR for the last 4 years. 

January 5, 2015 to March 2, 2015
Courses and Workshops
Dr. Elizabeth Lin
Winter 2015 Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction 8-Week Course
6:00 - 8:30pm  »  CCFW

Registration required. Please register here

You may view the class waiver here, which will be distributed, signed, and collected on the first day of class. Please review this note from Dr. Lin BEFORE registering to ensure that this class will be a proper fit for your needs.

Class Description

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a scientifically proven program developed by Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph.D. to reduce stress and increase well-being. It is flourishing worldwide. This 8 –week course combines contemplative practices based in Eastern philosophy, western psychology, and cutting-edge neuroscience.  Attitudes of kindness, acceptance and patience provide a foundation for the practices of sustained focus, self-regulation and self-exploration.  A greater sense of balance, choice and freedom is cultivated.

Benefits of MBSR: Participants have remarked, “Mindfulness has changed how I live and see the world, how I interact with others”. This course contribute to:

1. Reduced stress and chronic pain

2. Improved mood

3. Overcoming sleep problems

4. Decreased anxiety

5. Increased immunity

6. Enhanced resilience, joy, and compassion

7. Healthy aging

In this 8-week experiential course consisting of weekly classes, and home practices, participants will learn exercises to:

1. Increase awareness of body sensations (body scan)

2. Mindful movement and stretching (yoga)

3. Awareness of pleasant and unpleasant experiences

4. Awareness of thoughts and emotions

5. Increase compassion for ourselves and others

6. Latest research on mind-body response to stress and change

7. Practices to cultivate mindfulness throughout the day, living each moment to its fullest

About the Instructor

The course will be taught by Elizabeth H. B. Lin, MD, MPH. Dr. Lin is a family medicine physician, clinical professor at the University of Washington School of Medicine, and an affiliate scientific investigator at the Group Health Research Institute. As a physician researcher, Dr. Lin is well-known for scientific studies on improving mental and behavioral health for patients in general medical settings. Elizabeth has trained with Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn, founder of the Center for Mindfulness at U of Massachusetts, as well as other leading professors and teachers in this field. She has had a daily meditation practice for more than 20 years, and has taught MBSR for the last 4 years.

December 6, 2014
Professional Events
Molly Lawlor, M.A., Ph.D. Candidate
Mindfulness and Social Emotional Learning (SEL) in the Classroom
9a-12p  »  CCFW

Registration is required (closes 12/5/15). Please register here.

In this session, participants will be introduced to mindfulness, commonly defined as an open, non-judgmental awareness to the present moment. The application of mindfulness practices for children will be discussed within the framework of Social Emotional Learning (SEL). The latest research within the emerging field of mindfulness practice with children will be presented along with considerations for implementation in the classroom context. Participants will be offered experiential learning with guided mindfulness practice. Concepts will be expanded to discuss practical tools for children and how these can be implemented within the classroom context to support mindful awareness, social emotional competencies, and increased engagement.

Molly Lawlor, M.A. is the primary author of the Mind-Up program, a trainer for the program and a PhD candidate at the University of British Columbia. Her research includes, but not limited to, the effects of mindfulness-based education on pre- and early adolescents' well-being and social and emotional competence. Specifically, Molly is investigating prosocialness, mindfulness and psychological adjustment in children and adolescents. Currently, Molly is the Director of Curriculum for Taxi Dog Education, a multi-sensory social-emotional learning program. Molly will speak to the role of mindfulness in education, specific to social and emotional learning and self-regulation.

December 5, 2014
Free Public Lectures
Kimberly Schonert-Riechl, Ph.D.
Cultivating Kindness and Compassion in Children
7-8:30p  »  Kane Hall 220

Registration required (closes 12/5/14). Please register here.

Read summary

Understanding the factors that children and youth need to be successful in school and in life has long been an important objective for researchers, parents, and educators interested in the promotion of competence and the prevention of educational, psychological, and behavioural problems. Informed, in part, from recent research in the area of cognitive developmental neuroscience, the past decade has seen an abundance of research documenting the critical role that self-regulation, emotions, and social processes, such as social and emotional understanding and empathy, play in children’s successful development. This presentation will begin with a brief review of ground breaking research that has emerged that demonstrates the importance of promoting children’s social and emotional learning (SEL) in schools and describe how recent innovations in developmental neuroscience can inform these efforts.

Dr. Schonert-Reichl will describe some of the SEL initiatives in Canada and the US that are taking place, and highlight her own recent research evaluating a universal school-based social and emotional competence promotion program – MindUP – a program developed from research and theory in the fields of developmental neuroscience, mindful attention awareness, SEL, and positive psychology.  A discussion of both processes and mechanisms that underlie children’s social and emotional development in schools and practical implications for the promotion of children’s self-regulation, empathy, compassion, and kindness will be discussed.

Dr. Schonert-Reichl is an Applied Developmental Psychologist and an Associate Professor in the Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology and Special Education at the University of British Columbia. She began her professional career first as a middle school teacher and then as a high school teacher for youth “at risk.” For over 20 years she has been conducting research in the area of child and adolescent social and emotional learning (SEL) and development with a particular emphasis on identifying the processes and mechanisms that foster positive development, such as empathy, optimism, and altruism.

 

Many thanks to the generous sponsors of this lecture!

      

 
October 12, 2014 to November 16, 2014
Courses and Workshops
Ann Hollar, M.Ed.
Mindfulness 101 for Teens
Sundays from 4:00-5:15pm  »  CCFW

Registration required (closes 10/10/14). Please register here.

Is your teen driven to distraction? Overwhelmed with keeping up socially on-line and off? Stressed about homework? Caught up in negative thinking? In this six week course we will touch on many aspects of mindfulness that will help your teen navigate these exciting and complex high school years. This course is intended for high school aged teenagers (14-19 years old). Class size will range between 10 and 20 students. 

Class Schedule

Week 1 October 12: Brain, Body, Breath - Understanding the basics

Week 2 October 19: Home Sweet Home - Creating a sense of ease within ourselves

Week 3 October 26: Driven to Distraction - Learning how to focus attention

Week 4 November 2: Making Sense of your Senses - Slowing down and noticing

Week 5 November 9: Riding the Storm - Being with, not thrown, by strong emotions

Week 6 November 16: Giving Thanks - The power of gratitude and kindness

Ann Hollar is a mindfulness instructor in Seattle. She has a M. Ed from the University of Washington, focusing her thesis on “Mindfulness in Education:  The Secular Intersection of Buddhism and Neuroscience.” She currently teaches mindfulness to students in both public and private elementary, middle and high schools. She has been trained in both the MindUp and Mindful Schools curricula and has recently completed Mindful Schools Year-Long Instructor Certification Program. Her personal integration of mindfulness is constantly being kept alive via interactions with her three tween and teenaged boys.

October 9, 2014 to November 20, 2014
Courses and Workshops
Richard Berger, MD
(Re)Establishing a Mindfulness Practice with Ease
Every other Thursday, 6:30-8:30pm  »  CCFW

Registration is required (closes 10/8/14). Please register here.

Many people find beginning the practice of mindfulness to be somewhat daunting. This course is meant for individuals both new to mindfulness and those who want to enhance their daily practices. We will use the methods of “Immunity to Change” established by Kegan and Lahey to investigate reasons we may be resistant to mindfulness practice. We will also use the Kaizen (often called Toyota method) method to make small incremental progress in our practice without initial major life changes. Lastly, we will introduce practice techniques that develop the direction of the mind toward more balance of positivity/negativity and reduce the negative reinforcing consequences of guilt when we don’t practice.

Each student will be allowed to progress at their own pace. At the end of the 4 classes, students should:

1. Be able to practice several techniques that promote a more positive attitude as well as self-compassion towards oneself and others

2. Become familiar with the concept and science of taking very small steps to make significant changes in one's life

3. Become more adept at allowing and making steady progress in self growth and in identifying obstacles to growth and fulfillment of intentions

4. Be better able to manage the fear of making changes in a more systematic and productive manner

This course will be taught by Richard (Rick) E. Berger, MD, Professor Emeritus in the Medical School at the University of Washington, and primary teacher of Mindfulness NW. He received his undergraduate education and medical degree from The University of Chicago. He received mindfulness teaching training at the University of Massachusetts Center for Mindfulness (certification in MBSR under final review) and received a Certification in Mindfulness Facilitation from the Mindful Awareness Research Center at the University of California in Los Angeles.

Rick has taught Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Mindful Awareness Practices (MAPS) classes at the University of Washington Hospital, the University of Washington Intramural Activities Center and the Center for Child & Family Well-being. He also holds certificates to teach children and adolescents from Inner Kids and Mindful Schools and teaches mindfulness to children in the Seattle Public Schools. His ongoing practice includes daily meditation, yoga, silent retreats and continuing education in mindfulness and related areas.

September 7, 2014 to November 4, 2014
Courses and Workshops
Elizabeth H. B. Lin, MD, MPH
Fall 2014 Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction 8-Week Course
Sundays or Tuesdays from 6-8:30pm with a retreat on Saturday October 25 from 8:30-2:30pm  »  CCFW

Registration is full. Please register here for the Sunday section waitlist or here for the Tuesday section waitlist. Registration includes a 2-hour introductory class and both class sections will be combined for the Saturday retreat.

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is flourishing worldwide and participants have remarked, “Mindfulness has changed how I live and see the world, how I interact with others”. This course can contribute to:

  • Reduced stress and chronic pain
  • Improved mood
  • Overcoming sleep problems
  • Decreased anxiety
  • Increased immunity
  • Enhanced resilience, joy, and compassion

Scientific research demonstrates that Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) can lead to the above benefits as well as healthy aging. In this 8-week experiential course based on ”Full Catastrophe Living” by Jon Kabat-Zinn, 2013, participants will learn exercises to:

  • Increase awareness of body sensations (body scan)
  • Mindful movement and stretching (yoga)
  • Awareness of pleasant and unpleasant experiences
  • Awareness of thoughts and emotions
  • Increase compassion for ourselves and others
  • Latest research on mind-body response to stress and change
  • Practices to cultivate mindfulness throughout the day, living each moment to its fullest

The course will be taught by Elizabeth H. B. Lin, MD, MPH. Dr. Lin is a family medicine physician, clinical professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington School of Medicine, and an affiliate scientific investigator at the Group Health Research Institute. As a physician researcher, Dr. Lin is well-known for research on improving mental and behavioral health for patients in general medical settings. Elizabeth has trained with Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn, founder of the Center for Mindfulness at U of Massachusetts, as well as other leading professors and teachers in this field. She has had a daily medi! tation practice for more than 20 years.

July 25, 2014 to July 26, 2014
Special Events
The Siegel-Gottman Summit
Neuroscience Meets Family Science
8:30am - 5:00pm  »  UW Meany Theater

Register at https://www.gottman.com/shop/siegel-gottman-summit/. Receive UW's exclusive rate when you use the promo code SUMMITUW ($425 until July 1st).

Learn the science behind how the brain develops and is shaped through relationships. Understand what principles guide a happy, lasting relationship. In this rare training event, you will deepen your therapeutic skills by learning scientifically proven ways of assessing couples and implementing interventions by combining the principles of Interpersonal Neurobiology and Mindsight with Gottman Method Couples Therapy. Participants will be able to:

• Summarize the three domains of the Gottman Method Sound Relationship House
• Apply principles of Interpersonal Neurobiology to clinical assessment
• Describe ways in which the Gottman Method can be integrated with the principles of Interpersonal Neurobiology
• Define the self-organizing aspect of the mind and mental health
• Identify Gottman Method interventions that promote self-integration
• List as least seven aspects of integrative prefrontal functions
• Discuss the ways in which attachment patterns and couple relationship dynamics intersect

July 11, 2014 to July 13, 2014
Courses and Workshops
Robert Roeser, Ph.D. and Margaret Cullen, LMFT
Science and Practice of Compassion
July 11 from 4PM - 6PM, July 12 from 10AM - 4PM, July 13 from 10AM - 3PM  »  CCFW

The purpose of this 2.5 day, science and practice retreat is to introduce participants to the science and practice of compassion.  Compassion, defined simply as the capacity to feel, and wish to relieve, the suffering of others, is increasingly important in our society where high levels of personal and interpersonal stress exist, and also across the globe as we become a more interconnected and interdependent species coping with large scale problems like climate change, global inequality, and population growth.

Robert W. Roeser is a Professor of Psychology and Human Development in the Department of Psychology at Portland State University in Portland, Oregon. He received his Ph.D. from the Combined Program in Education and Psychology at the University of Michigan (1996) and holds master's degrees in religion and psychology, developmental psychology and clinical social work. In 2005 he was a United States Fulbright Scholar in India, from 1999-2004 he was a William T. Grant Faculty Scholar, and from 2006 to 2010 served as the Senior Program Coordinator for the Mind and Life Institute (Boulder, CO).

Dr. Roeser's research focuses on the developmental effects of schooling on student identity development, motivation, wellbeing and learning across childhood, adolescence, and emerging adulthood. He is also interested in the professional development of teachers, especially with regard to their developmental knowledge of students and professional dispositions such as mindfulness and compassion for self and others.

Currently, Dr. Roeser's Culture and Contemplation in Education Lab (CaCiEL) at Portland State University (Portland, OR) is devoted to the study of the putative effects of mindfulness and compassion training for teachers, parents and students with regard to health and wellbeing, teaching and learning, and ethical development. Can such trainings be viable and effective means of cultivating the skills and dispositions teachers and students need to thrive and flourish in the 21st Century – a healthy body, a calm and clear mind, and a kind and good heart?

Margaret Cullen is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and a Certified Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Teacher.  She has also trained with Zindel Segal in Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy and in MB Eat with Jean Kristeller. For fifteen years she has been teaching and pioneering mindfulness programs in a variety of settings including cancer support, HIV support, physician groups, executive groups, obesity and Kaiser patients.  For six years she has been involved in teaching and writing curricula for several research programs at UCSF including "Cultivating Emotional Balance" designed for teachers and "Craving and Lifestyle Management with Meditation" for overweight women.  In 2008 she launched a mindfulness-based emotional balance program for teachers and school administrators in Denver, Boulder, Ann Arbor and Vancouver, B.C. She has also been a facilitator of support groups for cancer patients and their loved ones for twenty years at The Cancer Support Community and is currently a senior teacher at the Center for Compassion at Stanford.  A meditation practitioner for nearly thirty years, she is a frequent contributor to "Inquiring Mind".

April 25, 2014 to May 10, 2014
Professional Events
Christa Turksma
CARE: Improving Classroom Learning Environments by Cultivating Awareness and Resilience in Education (CARE)
Fridays (4/25 and 5/9) from 5 - 8:30p and Saturdays (4/26 and 5/10) from 8:30a - 3:30p  »  CCFW

Registration is required. Please register here.

Course consists of two half-day training sessions, two full-day training sessions, and a follow-up (TBD, Mid-June). 

CARE (Cultivating Awareness and Resilience in Education) is a research based professional development program.  It was developed at the Garrison Institute by Patricia (Tish) Jennings, Associate Professor of Elementary Education at the Curry School of Education, VA, Richard C Brown, an educator  and  founder of the Contemplative Education Department at Naropa  University and Christa Turksma, a clinical psychologist and former elementary school principal.

Care is designed to teach teachers stress reducing techniques and ways to better understand and manage their emotions so they can create and maintain supportive learning environments, reduce burnout and attrition, and build strong relationships with their students to promote positive academic and behavioral outcomes.

Watch "Why CARE for Teachers Matters."

April 9, 2014 to May 28, 2014
Courses and Workshops
Dr. Richard Berger
Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction 8-Week Course
Wednesdays from 6:30-9:00pm with a daylong retreat on Saturday May 17 from 9:30am-4:30pm  »  CCFW

Registration is required. Please Register here.

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a program originally designed over thirty years ago by Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph.D. The course has a basis in eastern psychology but is very applicable to modern secular life. Mindfulness is the practice of sustained focus, self-regulation, self-exploration, and self-liberation with an accepting, open and kind attitude. This practice can produce calmness and expanded awareness. Neurophysiological studies have shown increased brain growth and function in areas of emotional control and executive function in as little as 8 weeks. Research shows decreased stress, improved self-image, and improved emotional regulation. Improved concentration and less anxiety are common outcomes.
 

Richard (Rick) E. Berger, MD, Professor Emeritus in the Medical School at the University of Washington, is the primary teacher of Mindfulness NW. He received his undergraduate education and medical degree from the University of Chicago. He received mindfulness teaching training at the University of Massachusetts Center for Mindfulness founded by Jon Kabat-Zinn and received a Certificate in Mindfulness Facilitation from the Mindful Awareness Research Center at the University of California in Los Angeles. Rick teaches Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Mindful Awareness Practices (MAPS) classes in the Seattle area. His ongoing practice includes daily meditation, yoga, silent retreats and continuing education in mindfulness and related areas.

March 26, 2014
Free Public Lectures
Richard J. Davidson, Ph.D.
Order and Disorder in the Developing Emotional Brain: Prospects for Cultivating Healthy Minds
7:00 - 8:30 pm  »  UW Kane Hall 130

Registration is required. Please register here.

Read summary

Individual differences in emotional reactivity and emotion regulation are pronounced and they account for substantial variation in developmental outcome and in predicting vulnerability and resilience in the face of challenge.  The neural substrates and biobehavioral correlates of such developmental individual differences will be described.  This work will form the backdrop for a consideration of how these emotional styles might be shaped through training.  Recent initiatives that are focused on training mindfulness and kindness in children and adolescents will be described and early evidence on the impact of such training on behavior and brain function will be presented.  The talk will underscore the need for a serious national research effort that is focused on cultivating social and emotional skills in children to foster the development of healthy minds.

Richard Davidson is a pioneer in neuroscience in the arena of emotion and neuroplasticity. He is the William James and Vilas Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry, Director of the Waisman Laboratory for Brain Imaging and Behavior and the Laboratory for Affective Neuroscience, and Founder and Chair of the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds, at the Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in Psychology and has been at Wisconsin since 1984. He has published more than 275 articles, many chapters and reviews and edited 13 books. He has been a member of the Mind and Life Institute’s Board of Directors since 1991. He is also the author of the recently published book (with Sharon Begley) The Emotional Life of Your Brain published by Penguin Press 2012. He can be found online at richardjdavidson.com

Many thanks to the sponsors of this lecture:

January 29, 2014 to March 19, 2014
Courses and Workshops
Richard Berger, M.D.
Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction for Professionals working with Children and Parents
6:30 - 9:00 pm  »  UW CCFWB

Wednesdays starting 01/29/2014. (Click here to see brochure for more information.) Register here.

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a program originally designed over thirty years ago by Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph.D. The course has a basis in eastern psychology but is very applicable to modern secular life. Mindfulness is the practice of sustained focus, self-regulation, self-exploration, and self-liberation with an accepting, open and kind attitude. This practice can produce calmness and expanded awareness. Neurophysiological studies have shown increased brain growth and function in areas of emotional control and executive function in as little as 8 weeks. Research shows decreased stress, improved self-image, and improved emotional regulation. Improved concentration and less anxiety are common outcomes (click link to recent research).

 

Richard (Rick) E. Berger, MD, Professor Emeritus in the Medical School at the University of Washington, is the primary teacher of Mindfulness NW. He received his undergraduate education and medical degree from the University of Chicago. He received mindfulness teaching training at the University of Massachusetts Center for Mindfulness founded by Jon Kabat-Zinn and received a Certificate in Mindfulness Facilitation from the Mindful Awareness Research Center at the University of California in Los Angeles. Rick teaches Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Mindful Awareness Practices (MAPS) classes in the Seattle area. His ongoing practice includes daily meditation, yoga, silent retreats and continuing education in mindfulness and related areas.

January 25, 2014
Courses and Workshops
Jon & Myla Kabat-Zinn
A Daylong Workshop on Mindful Parenting
9:00 am - 4:30 pm  »  Talaris Conference Center

Registration is required. Register here.

Read a summary about this event.

This workshop is for parents, grandparents, and parents-to-be, as well as anyone working with or caring for children. Parenting with mindfulness can enhance the wellbeing of children and parents alike, and bring greater empathy, acceptance and respect for each child’s unique being into family life. It will be held at the Talaris Conference Center.

December 7, 2013
Professional Events
Kristin Neff, Ph.D.
Self-Compassion and Emotional Resilience: For individuals working with Children and Parents
8:30- 12:30 pm  »  UW CCFWB

For many years self-esteem was seen to be the key to psychological health. However, research psychologists have identified several downsides to the endless pursuit of self-esteem such as constant social comparisons, and instability of self-worth. Research suggests that self-compassion is a healthier way of relating to oneself, offering all the benefits of self-esteem without its downsides. Self-compassion involves treating ourselves kindly, like we would a good friend we cared about. Rather than continually judging and evaluating ourselves, self-compassion involves generating kindness toward ourselves as imperfect humans, and learning to be present with the inevitable struggles of life with greater ease. It motivates us to make needed changes in our lives not because we’re worthless or inadequate, but because we care about ourselves and want to lessen our suffering. This workshop will provide simple tools for responding in a kind, compassionate way whenever we are experiencing painful emotions. We all want to avoid pain, but letting it in—and responding compassionately to our own imperfections without harsh self-condemnation—are essential steps toward living happier, more fulfilling lives. Through discussion, meditation, and experiential exercises, you will gain practical skills to help bring self-compassion into you daily life. You will learn how to stop being so hard on yourself; handle difficult emotions with greater ease; and motivate yourself with kindness rather than criticism. Practices will also be introduced to help ease stress for caregivers. This course is relevant for the general public as well as to practicing mental health professionals and educators.

Kristin Neff, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Human Development and Culture at the University of Texas at Austin. She is a pioneer in the field of self-compassion research, conducting the first empirical studies on self-compassion over a decade ago. In addition to writing numerous academic articles on the topic, she is author of the book "Self-Compassion," released by William Morrow in 2011. Kristin’s work has received extensive media coverage, including the New York Times, MSNBC, National Public Radio, Reader’s Digest, and Psychology Today. She offers workshops on self-compassion worldwide, and has developed an eight-week program to help people learn to be more self-compassionate in daily life. Information on self-compassion - including videos, guided meditations, exercises, research articles, and a way to test your own self-compassion level – is available at www.self-compassion.org. Kristin is also featured in the bestselling book and award-winning documentary The Horse Boy (www.horseboyworld.com), which chronicles her family’s journey to Mongolia where they trekked on horseback to find healing for her autistic son.

She can be found online at www.self-compassion.org

December 6, 2013
Free Public Lectures
Kristin Neff, Ph.D.
Self-Compassion and Psychological Well-being
7:00 - 8:30 pm  »  UW Kane Hall 220

For many years self-esteem was seen to be the key to psychological health. more recently, however, researchers have identified several downsides to the pursuit of self-esteem such as narcissism, ego-defensiveness, social comparisons, and the contingency and instability of self-worth. Research suggests that self-compassion is a healthier way of relating to oneself, offering the benefits of self-esteem without its downsides. Self-compassion involves treating ourselves kindly, like we would a close friend we cared about. This talk will present theory and research on selfcompassion, which a burgeoning empirical literature has shown to be powerfully associated with psychological wellbeing. it will distinguish self-compassion from self-esteem, self-pity, and self-indulgence, and also discuss research indicating that self-compassion is a more powerful and effective motivational tool than self-criticism. Findings will be presented from the mindful Self-Compassion program, an eightweek course developed in conjunction with Chris Germer that is designed to teach self-compassion skills.

Dr. Kristin neff is an Associate Professor in Human Development and Culture, Educational Psychology Department, University of Texas at Austin. She conducts research on self-compassion – a central construct in Buddhist psychology and one that had not yet been examined empirically. in addition to her pioneering research into self-compassion, she has developed an 8-week program to teach self-compassion skills. The program, co-created with her colleague Chris Germer at Harvard University, is called mindful Self-Compassion. Her book titled “SelfCompassion” was published by William morrow in April, 2011. Kristin was recently featured in the best-selling book and award-winning documentary called The Horse Boy – www.horseboymovie.com - which chronicles her family’s adventure with autism.

November 14, 2013
Courses and Workshops
Richard Berger, M.D.
Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction for Professionals working with Children and Parents
6:30 - 9:00 pm  »  UW CCFWB

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a program originally designed over thirty years ago by Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph.D. The course has a basis in eastern psychology but is very applicable to modern secular life. Mindfulness is the practice of sustained focus, self-regulation, self-exploration, and self-liberation with an accepting, open and kind attitude. This practice can produce calmness and expanded awareness. Neurophysiological studies have shown increased brain growth and function in areas of emotional control and executive function in as little as 8 weeks. Research shows decreased stress, improved self-image, and improved emotional regulation. Improved concentration and less anxiety are common outcomes (click link to recent research).

Richard (Rick) E. Berger, MD, Professor Emeritus in the Medical School at the University of Washington, is the primary teacher of Mindfulness NW. He received his undergraduate education and medical degree from the University of Chicago. He received mindfulness teaching training at the University of Massachusetts Center for Mindfulness founded by Jon Kabat-Zinn and received a Certificate in Mindfulness Facilitation from the Mindful Awareness Research Center at the University of California in Los Angeles. Rick teaches Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Mindful Awareness Practices (MAPS) classes in the Seattle area. His ongoing practice includes daily meditation, yoga, silent retreats and continuing education in mindfulness and related areas.

May 3, 2013
Professional Events
Susan Kaiser Greenland
The ABCs of Attention, Balance and Compassion
7:00 - 8:30 pm  »  UW Kane Hall 110

Registration is required. Click here to register.

Susan Kaiser Greenland, author of The Mindful Child, provides an introduction to the practice of mindfulness for children and young adults and its applications at home, in schools and in the caring professions. It focuses on the Inner Kids program, with age-appropriate and secular activities that help children from pre-kindergarten through young adult incorporate the new ABCs - attention, balance, and compassion - into their daily lives. The Inner Kids mindfulness practices you will learn develop greater mind-body awareness, manage and reduce stress, and can easily be adapted for home, afterschool programs, or private therapy and healthcare practice.

Susan Kaiser Greenland is a former corporate attorney who developed the Inner Kids mindful awareness program for children, teens and their families. Research on the Inner Kids elementary school program was conducted at the Mindful Awareness Research Center at UCLA and is published in the Journal of Applied School Psychology. Susan is author of The Mindful Child: How to Help Your Kid Manage Stress and Become
Happier, Kinder, and More Compassionate 
(Free Press, 2010). She teaches children, parents and professionals around the world and consults with various organizations on teaching mindful awareness in an age-appropriate and secular manner. With her husband, Seth Greenlandshe co-founded the Mindfulness Together Foundation (formerly known as the Inner Kids Foundation).  Susan lives in Los Angeles with her husband, and their two children. She can be found online at www.susankaisergreenland.com

See her recent interview: What is a Mindful Child?

March 1, 2013
Free Public Lectures
Dr. Dan Siegel
The Whole-Brain Child: 12 Strategies to Nurture Your Child’s Developing Mind
7:00 - 8:30 pm  »  UW Kane Hall

Read a summary of this lecture

In this seminar, an exciting new approach to raising children will be explored through engaging discussions, case examples, and experiential immersions. Parents, grandparents, teachers, child development professionals and others who help children grow will find this learning experience filled with scientifically based ideas and practical skills that can promote well-being in children’s lives. By offering a definition of an important aspect of the mind and a core mechanism of mental health, the whole-brain child approach offers care providers the cutting edge art and science of child development. 

How we focus our attention shapes the connections in the brain. And how the brain’s connections link to one another in an integrated way directly shapes how it functions in health. An integrated brain creates a flexible, flourishing mind and compassionate and rewarding relationships. By inspiring children to focus their attention in ways that are accessible and easy to teach, parents and educators can provide the kind of guidance that will promote the growth of neural integration at the heart of health. Even moments of despair and discouragement can be transformed into opportunities to deepen relationships and promote integration. Beyond merely tools of survival, this approach empowers us to enjoy the journey of caregiving as we transform challenge into integrative learning. Come join us and explore the exciting world of whole-brain parenting! 

April 4, 2012
Free Public Lectures
James Doty, M.D.
Transformation and transcendence: Discussing mental training, compassion and neuroscience
3:30 - 4:30p  »  UW Tower Auditorium

James Doty, M.D. Director and Founder of Project Compassion, Clinical Professor of Neurosurgery, Stanford University

November 29, 2011
Free Public Lectures
Stuart Shanker, Ph.D.
The Development of Self-regulation
1:00-2:30pm  »  CCFW

Stuart Shanker, Ph.D. Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Philosophy, York University, Toronto