Events

September 7, 2014 to November 4, 2014
Professional Trainings
Elizabeth H. B. Lin, MD, MPH
Fall 2014 Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction 8-Week Course
Sundays or Tuesdays from 6-8:30pm with a retreat on Saturday October 25 from 8:30-2:30pm  »  CCFW

Registration is full. Please register here for the Sunday section waitlist or here for the Tuesday section waitlist. Registration includes a 2-hour introductory class and both class sections will be combined for the Saturday retreat.

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is flourishing worldwide and participants have remarked, “Mindfulness has changed how I live and see the world, how I interact with others”. This course can contribute to:

  • Reduced stress and chronic pain
  • Improved mood
  • Overcoming sleep problems
  • Decreased anxiety
  • Increased immunity
  • Enhanced resilience, joy, and compassion

Scientific research demonstrates that Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) can lead to the above benefits as well as healthy aging. In this 8-week experiential course based on ”Full Catastrophe Living” by Jon Kabat-Zinn, 2013, participants will learn exercises to:

  • Increase awareness of body sensations (body scan)
  • Mindful movement and stretching (yoga)
  • Awareness of pleasant and unpleasant experiences
  • Awareness of thoughts and emotions
  • Increase compassion for ourselves and others
  • Latest research on mind-body response to stress and change
  • Practices to cultivate mindfulness throughout the day, living each moment to its fullest

The course will be taught by Elizabeth H. B. Lin, MD, MPH. Dr. Lin is a family medicine physician, clinical professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington School of Medicine, and an affiliate scientific investigator at the Group Health Research Institute. As a physician researcher, Dr. Lin is well-known for research on improving mental and behavioral health for patients in general medical settings. Elizabeth has trained with Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn, founder of the Center for Mindfulness at U of Massachusetts, as well as other leading professors and teachers in this field. She has had a daily medi! tation practice for more than 20 years.

July 25, 2014 to July 26, 2014
Professional Trainings
The Siegel-Gottman Summit
Neuroscience Meets Family Science
8:30am - 5:00pm  »  UW Meany Theater

Register at https://www.gottman.com/shop/siegel-gottman-summit/. Receive UW's exclusive rate when you use the promo code SUMMITUW ($425 until July 1st).

Learn the science behind how the brain develops and is shaped through relationships. Understand what principles guide a happy, lasting relationship. In this rare training event, you will deepen your therapeutic skills by learning scientifically proven ways of assessing couples and implementing interventions by combining the principles of Interpersonal Neurobiology and Mindsight with Gottman Method Couples Therapy. Participants will be able to:

• Summarize the three domains of the Gottman Method Sound Relationship House
• Apply principles of Interpersonal Neurobiology to clinical assessment
• Describe ways in which the Gottman Method can be integrated with the principles of Interpersonal Neurobiology
• Define the self-organizing aspect of the mind and mental health
• Identify Gottman Method interventions that promote self-integration
• List as least seven aspects of integrative prefrontal functions
• Discuss the ways in which attachment patterns and couple relationship dynamics intersect

July 11, 2014 to July 13, 2014
Professional Trainings
Robert Roeser, Ph.D. and Margaret Cullen, LMFT
Science and Practice of Compassion
July 11 from 4PM - 6PM, July 12 from 10AM - 4PM, July 13 from 10AM - 3PM  »  CCFW

The purpose of this 2.5 day, science and practice retreat is to introduce participants to the science and practice of compassion.  Compassion, defined simply as the capacity to feel, and wish to relieve, the suffering of others, is increasingly important in our society where high levels of personal and interpersonal stress exist, and also across the globe as we become a more interconnected and interdependent species coping with large scale problems like climate change, global inequality, and population growth.

Robert W. Roeser is a Professor of Psychology and Human Development in the Department of Psychology at Portland State University in Portland, Oregon. He received his Ph.D. from the Combined Program in Education and Psychology at the University of Michigan (1996) and holds master's degrees in religion and psychology, developmental psychology and clinical social work. In 2005 he was a United States Fulbright Scholar in India, from 1999-2004 he was a William T. Grant Faculty Scholar, and from 2006 to 2010 served as the Senior Program Coordinator for the Mind and Life Institute (Boulder, CO).

Dr. Roeser's research focuses on the developmental effects of schooling on student identity development, motivation, wellbeing and learning across childhood, adolescence, and emerging adulthood. He is also interested in the professional development of teachers, especially with regard to their developmental knowledge of students and professional dispositions such as mindfulness and compassion for self and others.

Currently, Dr. Roeser's Culture and Contemplation in Education Lab (CaCiEL) at Portland State University (Portland, OR) is devoted to the study of the putative effects of mindfulness and compassion training for teachers, parents and students with regard to health and wellbeing, teaching and learning, and ethical development. Can such trainings be viable and effective means of cultivating the skills and dispositions teachers and students need to thrive and flourish in the 21st Century – a healthy body, a calm and clear mind, and a kind and good heart?

Margaret Cullen is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and a Certified Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Teacher.  She has also trained with Zindel Segal in Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy and in MB Eat with Jean Kristeller. For fifteen years she has been teaching and pioneering mindfulness programs in a variety of settings including cancer support, HIV support, physician groups, executive groups, obesity and Kaiser patients.  For six years she has been involved in teaching and writing curricula for several research programs at UCSF including "Cultivating Emotional Balance" designed for teachers and "Craving and Lifestyle Management with Meditation" for overweight women.  In 2008 she launched a mindfulness-based emotional balance program for teachers and school administrators in Denver, Boulder, Ann Arbor and Vancouver, B.C. She has also been a facilitator of support groups for cancer patients and their loved ones for twenty years at The Cancer Support Community and is currently a senior teacher at the Center for Compassion at Stanford.  A meditation practitioner for nearly thirty years, she is a frequent contributor to "Inquiring Mind".

April 25, 2014 to May 10, 2014
Professional Trainings
Christa Turksma
CARE: Improving Classroom Learning Environments by Cultivating Awareness and Resilience in Education (CARE)
Fridays (4/25 and 5/9) from 5 - 8:30p and Saturdays (4/26 and 5/10) from 8:30a - 3:30p  »  CCFW

Registration is required. Please register here.

Course consists of two half-day training sessions, two full-day training sessions, and a follow-up (TBD, Mid-June). 

CARE (Cultivating Awareness and Resilience in Education) is a research based professional development program.  It was developed at the Garrison Institute by Patricia (Tish) Jennings, Associate Professor of Elementary Education at the Curry School of Education, VA, Richard C Brown, an educator  and  founder of the Contemplative Education Department at Naropa  University and Christa Turksma, a clinical psychologist and former elementary school principal.

Care is designed to teach teachers stress reducing techniques and ways to better understand and manage their emotions so they can create and maintain supportive learning environments, reduce burnout and attrition, and build strong relationships with their students to promote positive academic and behavioral outcomes.

Watch "Why CARE for Teachers Matters."

April 9, 2014 to May 28, 2014
Professional Trainings
Dr. Richard Berger
Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction 8-Week Course
Wednesdays from 6:30-9:00pm with a daylong retreat on Saturday May 17 from 9:30am-4:30pm  »  CCFW

Registration is required. Please Register here.

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a program originally designed over thirty years ago by Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph.D. The course has a basis in eastern psychology but is very applicable to modern secular life. Mindfulness is the practice of sustained focus, self-regulation, self-exploration, and self-liberation with an accepting, open and kind attitude. This practice can produce calmness and expanded awareness. Neurophysiological studies have shown increased brain growth and function in areas of emotional control and executive function in as little as 8 weeks. Research shows decreased stress, improved self-image, and improved emotional regulation. Improved concentration and less anxiety are common outcomes.
 

Richard (Rick) E. Berger, MD, Professor Emeritus in the Medical School at the University of Washington, is the primary teacher of Mindfulness NW. He received his undergraduate education and medical degree from the University of Chicago. He received mindfulness teaching training at the University of Massachusetts Center for Mindfulness founded by Jon Kabat-Zinn and received a Certificate in Mindfulness Facilitation from the Mindful Awareness Research Center at the University of California in Los Angeles. Rick teaches Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Mindful Awareness Practices (MAPS) classes in the Seattle area. His ongoing practice includes daily meditation, yoga, silent retreats and continuing education in mindfulness and related areas.

March 26, 2014
Free Public Lectures
Richard J. Davidson, Ph.D.
Order and Disorder in the Developing Emotional Brain: Prospects for Cultivating Healthy Minds
7:00 - 8:30 pm  »  UW Kane Hall 130

Registration is required. Please register here.

Individual differences in emotional reactivity and emotion regulation are pronounced and they account for substantial variation in developmental outcome and in predicting vulnerability and resilience in the face of challenge.  The neural substrates and biobehavioral correlates of such developmental individual differences will be described.  This work will form the backdrop for a consideration of how these emotional styles might be shaped through training.  Recent initiatives that are focused on training mindfulness and kindness in children and adolescents will be described and early evidence on the impact of such training on behavior and brain function will be presented.  The talk will underscore the need for a serious national research effort that is focused on cultivating social and emotional skills in children to foster the development of healthy minds.

Richard Davidson is a pioneer in neuroscience in the arena of emotion and neuroplasticity. He is the William James and Vilas Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry, Director of the Waisman Laboratory for Brain Imaging and Behavior and the Laboratory for Affective Neuroscience, and Founder and Chair of the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds, at the Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in Psychology and has been at Wisconsin since 1984. He has published more than 275 articles, many chapters and reviews and edited 13 books. He has been a member of the Mind and Life Institute’s Board of Directors since 1991. He is also the author of the recently published book (with Sharon Begley) The Emotional Life of Your Brain published by Penguin Press 2012. He can be found online at richardjdavidson.com

Many thanks to the sponsors of this lecture:

January 29, 2014 to March 19, 2014
Professional Trainings
Richard Berger, M.D.
Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction for Professionals working with Children and Parents
6:30 - 9:00 pm  »  UW CCFWB

Wednesdays starting 01/29/2014. (Click here to see brochure for more information.) Register here.

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a program originally designed over thirty years ago by Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph.D. The course has a basis in eastern psychology but is very applicable to modern secular life. Mindfulness is the practice of sustained focus, self-regulation, self-exploration, and self-liberation with an accepting, open and kind attitude. This practice can produce calmness and expanded awareness. Neurophysiological studies have shown increased brain growth and function in areas of emotional control and executive function in as little as 8 weeks. Research shows decreased stress, improved self-image, and improved emotional regulation. Improved concentration and less anxiety are common outcomes (click link to recent research).

 

Richard (Rick) E. Berger, MD, Professor Emeritus in the Medical School at the University of Washington, is the primary teacher of Mindfulness NW. He received his undergraduate education and medical degree from the University of Chicago. He received mindfulness teaching training at the University of Massachusetts Center for Mindfulness founded by Jon Kabat-Zinn and received a Certificate in Mindfulness Facilitation from the Mindful Awareness Research Center at the University of California in Los Angeles. Rick teaches Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Mindful Awareness Practices (MAPS) classes in the Seattle area. His ongoing practice includes daily meditation, yoga, silent retreats and continuing education in mindfulness and related areas.

January 25, 2014
Parent and Professional Workshops
Jon & Myla Kabat-Zinn
A Daylong Workshop on Mindful Parenting
9:00 am - 4:30 pm  »  Talaris Conference Center

Registration is required. Register here.

Read a summary about this event.

This workshop is for parents, grandparents, and parents-to-be, as well as anyone working with or caring for children. Parenting with mindfulness can enhance the wellbeing of children and parents alike, and bring greater empathy, acceptance and respect for each child’s unique being into family life. It will be held at the Talaris Conference Center.

December 7, 2013
Professional Trainings
Kristin Neff, Ph.D.
Self-Compassion and Emotional Resilience: For individuals working with Children and Parents
8:30- 12:30 pm  »  UW CCFWB

For many years self-esteem was seen to be the key to psychological health. However, research psychologists have identified several downsides to the endless pursuit of self-esteem such as constant social comparisons, and instability of self-worth. Research suggests that self-compassion is a healthier way of relating to oneself, offering all the benefits of self-esteem without its downsides. Self-compassion involves treating ourselves kindly, like we would a good friend we cared about. Rather than continually judging and evaluating ourselves, self-compassion involves generating kindness toward ourselves as imperfect humans, and learning to be present with the inevitable struggles of life with greater ease. It motivates us to make needed changes in our lives not because we’re worthless or inadequate, but because we care about ourselves and want to lessen our suffering. This workshop will provide simple tools for responding in a kind, compassionate way whenever we are experiencing painful emotions. We all want to avoid pain, but letting it in—and responding compassionately to our own imperfections without harsh self-condemnation—are essential steps toward living happier, more fulfilling lives. Through discussion, meditation, and experiential exercises, you will gain practical skills to help bring self-compassion into you daily life. You will learn how to stop being so hard on yourself; handle difficult emotions with greater ease; and motivate yourself with kindness rather than criticism. Practices will also be introduced to help ease stress for caregivers. This course is relevant for the general public as well as to practicing mental health professionals and educators.

Kristin Neff, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Human Development and Culture at the University of Texas at Austin. She is a pioneer in the field of self-compassion research, conducting the first empirical studies on self-compassion over a decade ago. In addition to writing numerous academic articles on the topic, she is author of the book "Self-Compassion," released by William Morrow in 2011. Kristin’s work has received extensive media coverage, including the New York Times, MSNBC, National Public Radio, Reader’s Digest, and Psychology Today. She offers workshops on self-compassion worldwide, and has developed an eight-week program to help people learn to be more self-compassionate in daily life. Information on self-compassion - including videos, guided meditations, exercises, research articles, and a way to test your own self-compassion level – is available at www.self-compassion.org. Kristin is also featured in the bestselling book and award-winning documentary The Horse Boy (www.horseboyworld.com), which chronicles her family’s journey to Mongolia where they trekked on horseback to find healing for her autistic son.

She can be found online at www.self-compassion.org

December 6, 2013
Free Public Lectures
Kristin Neff, Ph.D.
Self-Compassion and Psychological Well-being
7:00 - 8:30 pm  »  UW Kane Hall 220

For many years self-esteem was seen to be the key to psychological health. more recently, however, researchers have identified several downsides to the pursuit of self-esteem such as narcissism, ego-defensiveness, social comparisons, and the contingency and instability of self-worth. Research suggests that self-compassion is a healthier way of relating to oneself, offering the benefits of self-esteem without its downsides. Self-compassion involves treating ourselves kindly, like we would a close friend we cared about. This talk will present theory and research on selfcompassion, which a burgeoning empirical literature has shown to be powerfully associated with psychological wellbeing. it will distinguish self-compassion from self-esteem, self-pity, and self-indulgence, and also discuss research indicating that self-compassion is a more powerful and effective motivational tool than self-criticism. Findings will be presented from the mindful Self-Compassion program, an eightweek course developed in conjunction with Chris Germer that is designed to teach self-compassion skills.

Dr. Kristin neff is an Associate Professor in Human Development and Culture, Educational Psychology Department, University of Texas at Austin. She conducts research on self-compassion – a central construct in Buddhist psychology and one that had not yet been examined empirically. in addition to her pioneering research into self-compassion, she has developed an 8-week program to teach self-compassion skills. The program, co-created with her colleague Chris Germer at Harvard University, is called mindful Self-Compassion. Her book titled “SelfCompassion” was published by William morrow in April, 2011. Kristin was recently featured in the best-selling book and award-winning documentary called The Horse Boy – www.horseboymovie.com - which chronicles her family’s adventure with autism.

November 14, 2013
Parent and Professional Workshops
Richard Berger, M.D.
Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction for Professionals working with Children and Parents
6:30 - 9:00 pm  »  UW CCFWB

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a program originally designed over thirty years ago by Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph.D. The course has a basis in eastern psychology but is very applicable to modern secular life. Mindfulness is the practice of sustained focus, self-regulation, self-exploration, and self-liberation with an accepting, open and kind attitude. This practice can produce calmness and expanded awareness. Neurophysiological studies have shown increased brain growth and function in areas of emotional control and executive function in as little as 8 weeks. Research shows decreased stress, improved self-image, and improved emotional regulation. Improved concentration and less anxiety are common outcomes (click link to recent research).

Richard (Rick) E. Berger, MD, Professor Emeritus in the Medical School at the University of Washington, is the primary teacher of Mindfulness NW. He received his undergraduate education and medical degree from the University of Chicago. He received mindfulness teaching training at the University of Massachusetts Center for Mindfulness founded by Jon Kabat-Zinn and received a Certificate in Mindfulness Facilitation from the Mindful Awareness Research Center at the University of California in Los Angeles. Rick teaches Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Mindful Awareness Practices (MAPS) classes in the Seattle area. His ongoing practice includes daily meditation, yoga, silent retreats and continuing education in mindfulness and related areas.

May 3, 2013
Parent and Professional Workshops
Susan Kaiser Greenland
The ABCs of Attention, Balance and Compassion
7:00 - 8:30 pm  »  UW Kane Hall 110

Registration is required. Click here to register.

Susan Kaiser Greenland, author of The Mindful Child, provides an introduction to the practice of mindfulness for children and young adults and its applications at home, in schools and in the caring professions. It focuses on the Inner Kids program, with age-appropriate and secular activities that help children from pre-kindergarten through young adult incorporate the new ABCs - attention, balance, and compassion - into their daily lives. The Inner Kids mindfulness practices you will learn develop greater mind-body awareness, manage and reduce stress, and can easily be adapted for home, afterschool programs, or private therapy and healthcare practice.

Susan Kaiser Greenland is a former corporate attorney who developed the Inner Kids mindful awareness program for children, teens and their families. Research on the Inner Kids elementary school program was conducted at the Mindful Awareness Research Center at UCLA and is published in the Journal of Applied School Psychology. Susan is author of The Mindful Child: How to Help Your Kid Manage Stress and Become
Happier, Kinder, and More Compassionate 
(Free Press, 2010). She teaches children, parents and professionals around the world and consults with various organizations on teaching mindful awareness in an age-appropriate and secular manner. With her husband, Seth Greenlandshe co-founded the Mindfulness Together Foundation (formerly known as the Inner Kids Foundation).  Susan lives in Los Angeles with her husband, and their two children. She can be found online at www.susankaisergreenland.com

See her recent interview: What is a Mindful Child?

March 1, 2013
Free Public Lectures
Dr. Dan Siegel
The Whole-Brain Child: 12 Strategies to Nurture Your Child’s Developing Mind
7:00 - 8:30 pm  »  UW Kane Hall

In this seminar, an exciting new approach to raising children will be explored through engaging discussions, case examples, and experiential immersions. Parents, grandparents, teachers, child development professionals and others who help children grow will find this learning experience filled with scientifically based ideas and practical skills that can promote well-being in children’s lives. By offering a definition of an important aspect of the mind and a core mechanism of mental health, the whole-brain child approach offers care providers the cutting edge art and science of child development. 

How we focus our attention shapes the connections in the brain. And how the brain’s connections link to one another in an integrated way directly shapes how it functions in health. An integrated brain creates a flexible, flourishing mind and compassionate and rewarding relationships. By inspiring children to focus their attention in ways that are accessible and easy to teach, parents and educators can provide the kind of guidance that will promote the growth of neural integration at the heart of health. Even moments of despair and discouragement can be transformed into opportunities to deepen relationships and promote integration. Beyond merely tools of survival, this approach empowers us to enjoy the journey of caregiving as we transform challenge into integrative learning. Come join us and explore the exciting world of whole-brain parenting! 

April 4, 2012
Free Public Lectures
James Doty, M.D.
Transformation and transcendence: Discussing mental training, compassion and neuroscience
3:30 - 4:30p  »  UW Tower Auditorium

James Doty, M.D. Director and Founder of Project Compassion, Clinical Professor of Neurosurgery, Stanford University

November 29, 2011
Free Public Lectures
Stuart Shanker, Ph.D.
The Development of Self-regulation
1:00-2:30pm  »  CCFW

Stuart Shanker, Ph.D. Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Philosophy, York University, Toronto