Events

All Events

Friday, October 18, 2019
Professional Events
David Treleaven, PhD
9:00 am - 4:00 pm  »  UW Center for Urban Horticulture, NHS Hall, 3501 NE 41st St, Seattle, WA 98105

Registration is full. 

About this workshop

From elementary schools to psychotherapy offices, mindfulness meditation is an increasingly mainstream practice. At the same time, trauma remains a fact of life: the majority of us will experience a traumatic event in our lifetime, and some will develop post-traumatic stress. While this may appear to be a good thing -- trauma is an extreme form of stress, and mindfulness is a proven stress-reduction tool -- the reality creates a complex challenge.
 
Emerging research suggests that mindfulness interventions can help or hinder trauma survivors, raising a crucial question for mindfulness educators everywhere: How can you be prepared to minimize the potential dangers of mindfulness for survivors while leveraging its powerful benefits at the same time? 
 
Designed for wellness professionals, this one-day workshop--led by author and trauma specialist, David Treleaven, PhD--will equip you with the tools you need to offer mindfulness in a safe, effective, trauma-sensitive way.
 
Through lecture, case study, and experiential practice, you will leave the workshop:
 
• Understanding why meditation can create dysregulation for people who’ve experienced trauma and specific ways you can prevent this;
• Prepared to recognize symptoms of traumatic stress while offering mindfulness interventions;
• Informed about current empirical research regarding mindfulness and trauma, including evidence-based interventions you can apply immediately to your work;
• Equipped with tools and modifications to help you work skillfully with dysregulated arousal, traumatic flashbacks, and trauma-related dissociation. 
• Understanding the relationship between individual and systemic forms of trauma, including responsibilities to educate oneself about power, oppression, and social context.
 
Whether you’re a beginning or veteran practitioner, anyone engaged in offering contemplative practices will benefit from this workshop, including therapists, coaches, and meditation, classroom, yoga, or religious teachers.
 
Workshop fee:  $150.00, which includes a Certificate of Completion for 6 hours for licensed psychologistsmarriage and family therapistsmental health counselors, and social workers in Washington State. We can not guarantee that these CEUs will be accepted in other states. 
 
To view the confirmation email click here. Confirmation e-mail sent to registered participants on October 11, 2019 from ccfwb@uw.edu
 
Click here for a link with directions to the venue. 
 
 
About the Speaker

David Treleaven, PhD, is a writer, educator, and trauma professional whose work focuses on the intersection of trauma and mindfulness. He is author of the book Trauma-Sensitive Mindfulness: Practices for Safe and Transformative Healing (W. W. Norton, 2018), which was acclaimed by Rick Hanson as “a rare combination of solid scholarship, clinically useful methods, and passionate advocacy for those who have suffered from trauma.” He’s lectured on trauma-sensitive mindfulness at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), the Center for Mindfulness at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, and the Omega Institute in New York. Trained in counseling psychology at the University of British Columbia, he received his doctorate in psychology from the California Institute of Integral Studies and is currently a visiting scholar at Brown University.

Monday, November 11, 2019
Drop-in Meditation Sessions
Blair Carleton
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm  »  CCFW, 3903 Brooklyn Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98105

Drop-in meditation sessions are free. Register here

About this Session

Qigong is an ancient physical art and a moving meditation that can be a powerful tool for self-healing.  It is easy to learn and can be done anywhere – standing, sitting, or lying down. Qigong combines mental focus, breathing techniques, and body movements to promote balance and healing at the physical and emotional levels. It can be easily adapted and beneficial for people with limited mobility. This session is called “Mostly Qigong” because although we begin and end with qigong, we may add in additional mindfulness techniques. People from all experience levels are welcome.

About the instructor

Blair Carleton is a Recovery Coach trained by Washington State and the Connecticut Center for Addiction Recovery (CCAR). Blair received her B.A. from Yale University. She received her MSC Teacher Certificate from UCSD's Center for Mindful Self-Compassion with Dr. Kristin Neff and Dr. Chris Germer. Blair has also studied Shame-Resilience with Brene Brown, and went on to teach the curriculum. Blair credits her mindfulness practice to her teachers: Dr. Keesha Ewers, Ajayan Borys, Sylvia Boorstein, Joel and Michele Levey, and her friend and colleague, Yaffa Maritz, who was her instructor for the MSC course Blair took at the Center for Child and Family Well-Being.

Monday, December 9, 2019
Drop-in Meditation Sessions
Diane Hetrick
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm  »  CCFW, 3903 Brooklyn Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98105

Drop-in meditation sessions are free. Register here.

About this Session

We can actively cultivate qualities in our meditations that help provide us the resilience to keep returning to our meditation practice, as well as face whatever arises for us as we meditate. In particular, we will be working with:  setting stability as our intention, using spaciousness for our awareness, and generating warmth as our attitude.
 
Come experience this nourishing meditation as the darker nights of winter set in. 
 

About the instructor

Diane Hetrick has been studying and practicing in the areas of mind-body healing, mindfulness, meditation, and compassion cultivation most of her adult life. Her more than 30 years of experience as a Physical Therapist working with patients with chronic pain and/or illnesses lead her to explore various body and movement practices, including yoga, dance and qigong, and to explore the area of Mindfulness meditation, in order to help people with stress, pain or dysfunction find more ease, and well-being in their lives.

She completed the Certificate in Mindfulness Facilitation training through the Mindfulness Awareness Research Center (MARC) at UCLA. After completing the Compassion Cultivation Training (CCT) Teacher Certification Program, offered through the Center for Compassion, Altruism, Research and Education (CCARE) at Stanford, she became one of the first certified CCT teachers in the Seattle area. More at: http://www.dianehetrick.com/

Thursday, January 9, 2020
Courses and Workshops
Elizabeth Lin
10:00 am - 12:30 pm  »  CCFW, 3903 Brooklyn Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98105

Course Description

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a scientifically supported program developed by Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph.D. to reduce stress and increase well-being. It is flourishing worldwide. This 8 –week course combines contemplative practices based in Eastern philosophy, western psychology, and cutting-edge neuroscience.  Attitudes of kindness, acceptance and patience provide a foundation for the practices of sustained focus, self-regulation and self-exploration. A greater sense of balance, choice and freedom is cultivated.

Benefits of MBSR: Participants have remarked, “Mindfulness has changed how I live and see the world, how I interact with others”. This course contributes to:

1. Reduced stress and chronic pain
2. Improved mood
3. Overcoming sleep problems
4. Decreased anxiety
5. Increased immunity
6. Enhanced resilience, joy, and compassion
7. Healthy aging

In this 8-week experiential course consisting of weekly classes, and home practices, participants will learn exercises to:

1. Increase awareness of body sensations (body scan)
2. Mindful movement and stretching (yoga)
3. Awareness of pleasant and unpleasant experiences
4. Awareness of thoughts and emotions
5. Increase compassion for ourselves and others
6. Latest research on mind-body response to stress and change
7. Practices to cultivate mindfulness throughout the day, living each moment to its fullest

Course Dates

8-week course, Thursdays for 2.5 hours
January 9 – February 27, 2020  |  10:00 am - 12:30 pm 
February 9, 2020 9:00 am - 3:00 pm

** Note that the first and last class may go 15 minutes longer **

Course Fees

$370.00: Regular registration
$375.00: Registration with clock hours or a certificate of completion to use for CEUs

UW Affiliate Discount

25% off for UW faculty and staff - must register with UW email address and provide department name, office, and position. 

If you are interested in financial assistance, CCFW offers two options:

  • Income-based reduced fee of $275, available to individuals with an annual household income from all sources of $60,000 or less. For more details, please email ccfwb@uw.edu 

  • A limited number of scholarships are available per course. To apply for a scholarship, please review criteria and complete the application form at https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/mindful/237140   Important note: Scholarship applications are due three weeks before class start. Applicants will be notified 2 weeks prior to the first day of class. Applicants must wait to register for the course until a decision has been made in order to qualify.

Continuing Education Units (CEUs)

Register for a Certificate of Completion and get CEUs. Our CEUs are available for licensed psychologistsmarriage and family therapistsmental health counselors,  and social workers in Washington State. We cannot gurantee that these CEUs will be accepted in other states.

About the Instructor

Elizabeth H. B. Lin, MD, MPH. Elizabeth is a family medicine physician, clinical professor at the School of Medicine, University of Washington, and an adjunct scientific investigator at the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute.  As a physician researcher, Elizabeth and her team have conducted innovative research to improve mind-body health in general medical settings which have been adopted worldwide. Elizabeth has had a daily meditation practice for more than 25 years. She has trained extensively with Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn and leaders in mindfulness programs, as well as Drs. Germer and Neff, founders of the Mindful Self-Compassion program.  She is a certified instructor and has been teaching mindfulness and compassion over the past 7 years. 

 Comments from past participants in Dr. Lin's classes

"As an educator, I was very nervous that I would not like the teaching style or teacher, but I could not have asked for a better instructor. Elizabeth teaches with a full heart and brings a unique energy to class that is spiritual and inspiring. The class exceeded my expectations in many ways: free resources, poems, classroom culture, snacks! I came away each week feeling taken care of in a way that gave me renewed energy to care for myself. The safe space Elizabeth helped our class cultivate gave me the confidence I needed to share honestly in small groups"

"Dr. Lin is a wonderful, caring, respectful and well-prepared instructor and did a fantastic job teaching this class. I particularly appreciated her taking time to answer questions in a thoughtful way. This, along with the content of what she said, was most enlightening for me, because I have begun to pause and take more time in my own communications with other people." 

"Elizabeth is a welcoming and receptive instructor and communicated her own enthusiasm for a mindfulness approach to life in general. I liked how she used her own experience as a student of mindfulness over many years." 

"Elizabeth is very thoughtful, non-judgmental, humble, and caring."

“I did not expect the life-changing experience that it (the class) turned out to be. Thank you for giving me back to my family and myself.”

Thursday, January 9, 2020
Courses and Workshops
Elizabeth Lin and Brenda Butterfield
6:00 pm - 8:30 pm  »  CCFW, 3903 Brooklyn Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98105

Register here.

Course description

Mindful Self-Compassion (MSC) is a well-researched and effective 8-week program developed by Drs. Chris Germer and Kristin Neff. This class helps participants develop the habits of being kinder to ourselves and others, and living with more ease and well-being in our daily life. Mindful self-compassion is a first step in emotional healing. We learn to be-friend oneself, and acknowledge our difficult thoughts and feelings with a spirit of openness, curiosity and love, rather than self-judgment, or self-criticism.

In the weekly program, participants will learn through activities such as meditation, experiential exercises, short presentations, group discussion and home practices. Learning is mostly experiential and includes current theory and research on self-compassion. 

Research has shown that self-compassion greatly enhances emotional well-being. It boosts resilience, happiness, reduces anxiety and depression, and can even help maintain healthy lifestyle habits such as healthy eating and exercise.  MSC can be learned by anyone. It’s the practice of recognizing moments of difficulty, and repeatedly evoking good will toward ourselves. It extends cultivation of that same desire beyond ourselves to all living beings to live happily and free from suffering.

Perhaps most importantly, cultivating self-compassion allows one to honor and accept our humanness. Things will not always go the way we want them to. We often encounter frustrations and losses. We make mistakes and bump up against our limitations, or fall short of our ideals. This is the human condition, a reality shared by us all. The more we open our heart to this reality instead of constantly fighting against it, the more we will be able to feel compassion for ourselves and all our fellow humans.

Class Dates

Thursdays, January 9 – February 27, 2020, 6:00 pm – 8:30 pm
**First and last class may go about 15 minutes longer**

Retreat on Saturday, February 8, 2020, 9:00 am - 1:00 pm

Course Fees

$370.00: Regular registration
$375.00: Registration with clock hours or a certificate of completion to use for CEUs

Required Workbook

Participants are required to purchase a workbook, The Mindful Self-Compassion Workbook available online or at your favorite book store. Prices range from about $10-$19 depending on the store. 

UW Affiliate Discount

25% off for UW faculty and staff - must register with UW email address and provide department name, office, and position. 

If you are interested in financial assistance, CCFW offers two options:

  • Income-based reduced fee of $275, available to individuals with an annual household income from all sources of $60,000 or less. For more details, please email ccfwb@uw.edu 

  • A limited number of scholarships are available per course. To apply for a scholarship, please review criteria and complete the application form at https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/mindful/237140   Important note: Scholarship applications are due 3 weeks before class start. Applicants will be notified 2 weeks prior to the first day of class. Applicants must wait to register for the course until a decision has been made in order to qualify. 

Continuing Education Units (CEUs)

Register for a Certificate of Completion and get CEUs. Our CEUs are available for licensed psychologistsmarriage and family therapistsmental health counselors,  and social workers in Washington State. We cannot gurantee that these CEUs will be accepted in other states.

About the Instructors

Picture of instructor Elizabeth Lin, MD MPH

Elizabeth H. B. Lin, MD, MPH is a family medicine physician, clinical professor at the School of Medicine, University of Washington, and an affiliate scientific investigator at the Group Health Research Institute. As a physician researcher, Elizabeth and her team have conducted innovative research to improve mind-body health in general medical settings, which have been adopted worldwide. Elizabeth has had a daily meditation practice for more than 25 years.  She has trained extensively with leaders in mindfulness programs, and began teaching Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction 4 years ago. She has trained with Drs. Chris Germer and Kristen Neff, to become a teacher in Mindful Self-Compassion.  
 

 

 

Brenda S. Butterfield, EdD, MSW, LMHC is founder of Our New Experience (ONE), LLC in Redmond, WA. She has been a mental health professional for over 30 years serving children, youth, families and communities in the US and abroad. In her clinical work, Dr. Butterfield uses an integrative, whole person perspective to support development of each human’s full potential.  Dr. Butterfield teaches Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) courses, offers meditation workshops, facilitates retreats and presents a variety of seminars and professional development trainings for mental health practitioners and other caregivers locally and nationally. Find out more about Brenda here.: http://ournewexperience.org/

 

Past Participant Feedback
"Thank you for a very well thought out and delivered class. I really thought your mix of meditations, poetry and exercises worked so well together." - Phil, Winter 2016 Class Participant 

"This course has been a gift that keeps on giving. The best moment to sum this up was my 15 year old turning to me in the car this week and saying, "Mom, you seem realllllly different. What's up?"   Best gift ever. He noticed I am calmer and is almost curious about trying some "mindfulness" himself." - M. Winter 2016 MSC Class Participant

"Thank you both, so much, for your instruction, guidance, & presence in delivering this class to us. I appreciate all that you put into it. I'm very glad that I took the class, as it has reinforced, deepened, & strengthened my compassion towards myself, which then allows me to show up in more compassionate ways with others." - Paul, Winter 2016 Class Participant

Tuesday, January 21, 2020
Courses and Workshops
Diane Hetrick
6:00 pm - 8:00 pm  »  CCFW, 3903 Brooklyn Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98105

**Please note corrected dates, January 21 - February 25, 2020.
Register here

Course Description

We all know, really, that stress isn't going away in our lives. In fact, with the fast pace of technology and change, it may increase.  And, we may not really want it to go away - stress can help us in many ways: it can grab our attention, remind us we need to make corrections away from our difficulties or lean into our resources to achieve new accomplishments. Even pleasant and positive events, such as vacations, celebrations, and life transitions, can be stressful.

This class, taught by Diane Hetrick, Certified Mindfulness facilitator (UCLA) and Compassion Cultivation Training (CCT) facilitator (Stanford), draws from the work of both the MBSR and CCT classes, as well as some of the latest neuroscience and research of Kelly McGonigal in her book The Upside of Stress and Paul Gilbert in his book The Compassionate Mind. 

You'll learn many of the same tools and practices as the traditional MBSR classes, as well as expanding out to tap into your own internal and external resources to develop more resilience and joy in the face of stress. This class incorporates a daily mindfulness meditation practice, as well as real life practices, to make it immediately useful for your life.

Course Outline

Week One: Stress and the role of mindfulness and resilience

  • Understanding mindfulness and resilience, and how they might help us manage and even thrive with the day to day stress of life
  • The fallacy of stress reduction, and why we need stress resilience
  • A look at the latest research and perspectives re stress resilience, and how we might cultivate them in our lives

Week Two: Working with our mindset – the upside of stress

  • Looking at how our brains work, and then learning how to work with our brains
  • Discussion of our negative biases, the Default Mode Network and our wandering mind

Week Three: Body and movement practices to support building our resilience

  • The role of movement, breath, and the vagus nerve to help us develop a physiology of resilience and courage
  • Please bring a yoga mat to this class

Week Four: Deepening into our mindfulness practices to manage and thrive with stress

  • Explore some of the work of Martin Seligman: The 3 P’s that interfere with resilience – personalization, pervasiveness, and permanence and how mindfulness and resilience training can support us here

Week Five: Resilience: Growing our support systems, and communication skills

  • Exploring the concepts of our common humanity, and the role kindness, courage, altruism, and gratitude have on our resilience
  • Developing our capacity to listen, even in challenging situations. Listening for underlying needs
  • The importance of remembering our intentions and values

Week Six: The role of forgiveness – for ourselves and others

  • Working with Self Compassion and then broadening this out towards others
  • Final tips for developing a resilient life

Each class will include:

  • An initial settling meditation practice
  • Sharing of current research and perspectives, and group discussion of how to apply these to our lives
  • Individual or small group guided exercises (including written and verbal)
  • Embodying movement practices
  • Guided meditation practice
  • Suggested home practice ideas

Class Dates

6-week course on Tuesday evenings for 2 hours
Corrected Dates: January 21 – February 25, 2020 | 6:00 – 8:00pm

Course Fees

$270.00 regular registration
$275.00: Registration with a certificate of completion to use for CEUs
$200.00: UW Faculty and Employee Rate

If you are interested in financial assistance, CCFW offers two options:

  • Income-based reduced fee of $200, available to individuals with an annual household income from all sources of $60,000 or less. For more details, please email ccfwb@uw.edu 

  • A limited number of scholarships are available per course. To apply for a scholarship, please review criteria and complete the application form at https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/mindful/237140   Important note: Scholarship applicants will be notified no later than 3 weeks prior to the first day of class. Applicants must wait to register for the course until a decision has been made in order to qualify.

Continuing Education Units (CEUs)

Register for a Certificate of Completion and get CEUs. Our CEUs are available for licensed psychologistsmarriage and family therapistsmental health counselors,  and social workers in Washington State. We cannot gurantee that these CEUs will be accepted in other states. 

About the Instructor

Diane Hetrick, CMT-P has been studying and practicing in the areas of mind-body healing, mindfulness, meditation, and compassion cultivation most of her adult life. Her more than 30 years of experience as a Physical Therapist working with patients with chronic pain and/or illnesses lead her to explore various body and movement practices, including yoga, dance and qigong, and to explore the area of Mindfulness meditation, in order to help people with stress, pain or dysfunction find more ease, and well-being in their lives.

She completed the Certificate in Mindfulness Facilitation training through the Mindfulness Awareness Research Center (MARC) at UCLA. After completing the Compassion Cultivation Training (CCT) Teacher Certification Program, offered through the Center for Compassion, Altruism, Research and Education (CCARE) at Stanford, she became one of the first certified CCT teachers in the Seattle area. More at: http://www.dianehetrick.com/

Saturday, January 25, 2020
Family Events
Liliana Lengua, PhD
9:00 am - 12:00 pm  »  CCFW, 3903 Brooklyn Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98105

Register here
 

Workshop Description

Is your child the one clinging to you at the door when you try to drop him off at a birthday party, too nervous to join the party? Or was your child the one that was so excited to get to the party that she darted into the street even after you just got done telling her to stay right by the car when she got out? Or did you not even make it to the party because your child was so frustrated and angry about having to wear a jacket that he broke down into a total crying and yelling fit?

And were you feeling self-conscious that other parents were viewing you as ineffective and not in control of your child? 

Some of these challenging behaviors from our children can stem from their temperament – the emotional and self-regulation characteristics that they are born with. Many children present challenging emotional and behavioral responses to every-day situations, and these experiences can be very stressful for parents and families. It’s not always clear what is the most effective way to deal with these behaviors – should a parent use more negative consequences? More rewards? Be more firm? More gentle? Pick your battles? Stick to your guns? More importantly, children can present these challenging behaviors for very different underlying reasons depending on their temperament, and parents can be more effective if they understand the source of their children’s reactions. Little if any parenting advice that is available to parents provides the critical understanding of the role of children’s temperament in shaping children’s behavior and our parenting. This interactive presentation will provide an opportunity to learn about:

1. The sources of children's temperament or individual differences in their reactions.
2. How temperament can elicit less-than-ideal parenting from even the best of parents.
3. How to parent more effectively with children's temperament in mind.

Workshop fees

We will offer a sliding scale fee system for this workshop. You may choose from one of the following:

  • Community Fee $45 - this is a reduced fee to help make the course accessible to people who have limited financial resources, and work with children and families. This fee does not cover the full cost of the workshop and is subsidized by people paying at the Supporting Level. 
     
  • Sustaining Fee $60 - This fee covers the actual cost of the course. Please select this price if you are able to pay the full workshop fee.
     
  • Supporting Fee $75 - Help make mindfulness and compassion workshops more accessible to people throughout the community. This fee covers the cost of the workshop and allows CCFW to continue offering subsidized fees for people working with children and families, or who have limited financial means
     

This course is eligible for Continuing Education Units (CEUs). 3 CEUs will be available for licensed psychologists, marriage and family therapists, mental health counselors,  and social workers in Washington State. We cannot gurantee that these CEUs will be accepted in other states. 

About the Presenter

 

Liliana Lengua, Ph.D. is a mother of 3 (temperamentally unique) children, a child clinical psychologist, a professor of psychology at the University of Washington, and director of the UW Center for Child and Family Well-Being. She is internationally recognized for her research on children’s vulnerable and resilient responses to stress, demonstrating how parenting and children’s temperament contribute to children’s responses to stress. She has conducted 25 years of research on the interplay between children’s temperament and parenting. She is also recognized for her research on the effects of stress and disadvantage on parenting and children’s social-emotional development. She has been the principal investigator of several federally funded research projects and is the author of more than 100 published papers.

Tuesday, February 11, 2020
Free Public Lectures
Ruth Feldman, PhD
7:00 - 8:30 PM  »  University of Washington, Kane Hall, Rm. 120, 4069 Spokane Ln, Seattle, WA 98103

Registration is required. Register here

Synchrony – the coordination of biological and behavioral processes between children and their caregivers during moments of social contact - provides the basis for social connectedness and charts a central process in the development of stress management, empathy, and the development of the "affiliative brain". 

In this talk, I will present our model on the neurobiology of human attachments in relation to the oxytocin system – the hormone system related to social bonding, and sometimes called the “love hormone.” This presentation will detail how the oxytocin system evolved to support the expression of synchrony at the genetic, brain, hormonal, and behavioral levels and how the mother-infant bond provides the neurobiological template for all other social affiliations throughout life: with fathers, close friends, romantic partners, and fellow-humans. 

Next, I will present our research on the parental brain, addressing similarities and differences between the maternal and the paternal brain, and discuss how the human parental brain supports the development of socio-emotional competencies and the social brain in children, charting the cross-generational transmission of affiliation that enables humans to love, care, and adapt a life of meaning. 

Finally, I will present findings from three cohorts of families who represent high-risk contexts, each followed from infancy to young adulthood, and demonstrate how disruptions to maternal-infant bonding, in contexts such as premature birth, maternal post-partum depression, and chronic trauma, impact children's brain and behavior.  The talk will conclude with vignettes from a new intervention that help depressed mothers synchronize with their infants and minimize the level of intrusive behavior and by addressing the implications of our model for debates about mind-brain polarity.

At the end of the talk, participants will be able to

  1. Understand how the parent's brain develops during the transition to parenthood and why it is important
  2. Learn about the role of oxytocin, the love hormone, in initiating the bond between parents and infants and how this bond develops through synchronous interaction to support resilience from infancy to adulthood
  3.  Know about the specific disruptions to the neurobiology of affiliation and caregiving behavior that characterize depressed mothers and potential avenues for treatment
  4.  

Ruth Feldman, PhD is the Simms-Mann Professor of Developmental Social Neuroscience at the Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzlia in Tel Aviv. She holds a joint appointment at Yale Child Study Center. Dr. Feldman holds degrees in music composition, neuroscience, clinical psychology, and developmental psychology and psychopathology.  Her conceptual model on biobehavioral synchrony systematically describes how a lived experience within close relationships builds brain, creates relationships, confers resilience, and promotes creativity.  Her studies were the first to detail the role of oxytocin in the formation of human social bonds.