Events

All Events

Wednesday, March 8, 2017
Courses and Workshops
Rick Berger, MD
6:30pm - 9:00pm  »  CCFW

Registration is required. Please register here.

Wednesdays, March 8 – April 26, 2017, 6:30pm – 9:00pm
Retreat Saturday April 22, 2017, 9:00am – 3:00pm

Course Description

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a program originally designed over thirty years ago by Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph.D. The course has a basis in eastern psychology and is very applicable to modern secular life. Mindfulness is the practice of sustained focus, self-regulation, self-exploration, and self-liberation with an accepting, open and kind attitude. This practice can produce calmness and expanded awareness. Neurophysiological studies have shown increased brain growth and function in areas of emotional control and executive function in as little as 8 weeks. Research shows decreased stress, improved self-image, and improved emotional regulation. Improved concentration and less anxiety are common outcomes.

Class Dates

8-week course on Wednesday evenings for 2.5 hours
March 8 – April 26, 2017 from 6:30 - 9:00pm
Retreat: Saturday April 22 (9:00am - 3:00pm)

Course Fees

$350.00: Regular registration
$355.00: Registration with clock hours or a certificate of completion to use for CEUs
$262.50 (25% off): UW Affiliate Registration, which requires department approval and budget number

Scholarships and income-based reduced fee options available. Please see the registration page for details, or email mindful@uw.edu

About the Instructor

Richard (Rick) E. Berger, MD, Professor Emeritus in the Medical School at the University of Washington, is the primary teacher of Mindfulness NW. He received his undergraduate education and medical degree from The University of Chicago. He received his certification in the teaching of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction at the University of Massachusetts Center for Mindfulness  and received a Certification in Mindfulness Facilitation from the Mindful Awareness Research Center at the University of California in Los Angeles. Rick has taught Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Mindful Awareness Practices (MAPS) classes at the University of Washington Hospital, the University of Washington Intramural Activities Center and the Center for Child and Family Well-being. He also holds certificates to teach mindfulness to children and adolescents from Inner Kids and Mindful Schools and teaches mindfulness in the Seattle Public Schools. His ongoing practice includes daily meditation, yoga, silent retreats and continuing education in mindfulness and related areas.

"The best part of the class was interacting with Dr. Berger, experiencing his good heart, the daily practice of meditating, and the frequent practice of mindfulness during each day. As a result of the class activities, I feel much more connected to myself, more calm and peaceful, happy."

"I like the way Rick led the class with gentleness and patience. He led us, but at the same time made it seem he was on the journey with us."

"Rick did a great job at teaching the material and was welcoming and accessible and made it seem so easy. I appreciated his humor too!" 

"Rick Berger was wise, present, patient, funny, and accepting."

"I enjoyed Richard's cheerful patient attitude."

Monday, March 13, 2017
Drop-in Meditation Sessions
Elizabeth Lin, MD
6:00pm - 7:00pm  »  CCFW

Drop-in meditation sessions are free. Registration is requested. Please register here.

CCFW is pleased to offer monthly drop-in meditation sessions. A different CCFW instructor will lead each month’s session so that participants can experience different mindfulness practices and instructor styles. These sessions are also intended to support participants from previous mindfulness courses in strengthening their home practice. All levels of experience are welcome.

This session will draw upon Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Mindful Self-Compassion (MSC), two empirically-supported eight week training programs.  In this session, we will focus on bringing kindness and curiosity to the foundational practice of body awareness meditation.  Research has shown that self-compassion greatly enhances emotional well-being. It boosts resilience, happiness, reduces anxiety and depression, and can even help maintain healthy lifestyle habits such as diet and exercise.

About the Instructor

Elizabeth H. B. Lin, MD, MPH. Elizabeth is a family medicine physician, clinical professor at the School of Medicine, University of Washington, and an affiliate scientific investigator at the Group Health Research Institute. As a physician researcher, Elizabeth and her team have conducted innovative research to improve mind-body health in general medical settings which have been adopted worldwide. Elizabeth has had a daily meditation practice for more than 25 years.  She has trained extensively with leaders in mindfulness programs, and began teaching Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction 4 years ago. She has trained with Drs. Chris Germer and Kristen Neff, to become a teacher in Mindful Self-Compassion. 

Thursday, March 16, 2017
Courses and Workshops
Yaffa Maritz and Elizabeth Lin
6:00pm - 8:30pm  »  CCFW

Registration is full. Add yourself to the waitlist  here or check out our afternoon Mindful Self-Compassion course back on the events page. 

Thursdays, March 16 – May 4, 2017, 6:00pm – 8:30pm
Retreat Sunday April 23, 2017, 1:00pm - 5:00pm

Course Description

Mindful Self-Compassion (MSC) is a well-researched and effective 8-week program developed by Drs. Chris Germer and Kristin Neff. This class helps participants develop the habits of being kinder to ourselves and others, and living with more ease and well-being in our daily life. Mindful self-compassion is a first step in emotional healing. We learn to be-friend oneself, and acknowledge our difficult thoughts and feelings with a spirit of openness, curiosity and love, rather than self-judgment, or self-criticism.

In the weekly program, participants will learn through activities such as meditation, experiential exercises, short presentations, group discussion and home practices. Learning is mostly experiential and includes current theory and research on self-compassion. 

Research has shown that self-compassion greatly enhances emotional well-being. It boosts resilience, happiness, reduces anxiety and depression, and can even help maintain healthy lifestyle habits such as healthy eating and exercise.  MSC can be learned by anyone. It’s the practice of recognizing moments of difficulty, and repeatedly evoking good will toward ourselves. It extends cultivation of that same desire beyond ourselves to all living beings to live happily and free from suffering.

Perhaps most importantly, cultivating self-compassion allows one to honor and accept our humanness. Things will not always go the way we want them to. We often encounter frustrations and losses. We make mistakes and bump up against our limitations, or fall short of our ideals. This is the human condition, a reality shared by us all. The more we open our heart to this reality instead of constantly fighting against it, the more we will be able to feel compassion for ourselves and all our fellow humans.

Class Dates

8-week course on Thursday evenings for 2.5 hours
March 16 – May 4, 2017 from 6:00 - 8:30pm
Retreat: Sunday, April 23, 2017, 10am-2pm

Course Fees

$360.00 regular registration
$365.00: Registration with a certificate of completion to use for CEUs
$270.00 (25% off): UW Affiliate Registration, which requires department approval and budget number

Scholarships and income-based reduced fee options available. Please see the registration page for details, or email mindful@uw.edu

About the Instructors

Yaffa Maritz, LMHC
Yaffa is a co-founder of Listening Mothers and clinical director of both Listening Mothers and Reflective Parenting, two research based parenting programs. She is the founder and director of the Community of Mindful Parenting. Yaffa was born and trained in Israel as a clinical psychologist. She is also a licensed mental health counselor with advanced training in infant mental health. She is an advocate for the well-being of children and their families and served on several local and national boards that promote this agenda, including the Governor’s Commission for Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention. Yaffa believes that by supporting parents and creating nurturing communities for them, we can set the foundation for the positive growth of children’s social, emotional, and mental health. 

Yaffa participated in the Stanford yearlong teachers training program called CCT (Compassion Cultivation Training) that was offered through Stanford's Center for Compassion, Altruism, Research and Education. She also completed the advanced training program in MSC (Mindful Self-Compassion) with Drs. Kristin Neff and Chris Germer.  

Elizabeth H. B. Lin, MD, MPH
Elizabeth is a family medicine physician, clinical professor at the School of Medicine, University of Washington, and an affiliate scientific investigator at the Group Health Research Institute. As a physician researcher, Elizabeth and her team have conducted innovative research to improve mind-body health in general medical settings, which have been adopted worldwide. Elizabeth has had a daily meditation practice for more than 25 years.  She has trained extensively with leaders in mindfulness programs, and began teaching Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction 4 years ago. She has trained with Drs. Chris Germer and Kristen Neff, to become a teacher in Mindful Self-Compassion.  

Thursday, March 16, 2017
Courses and Workshops
Yaffa Maritz and Blair Carleton
12:00pm - 2:30pm  »  CCFW

Registration is required. please register here

Thursdays, March 16 – May 4, 2017, 12:00-2:30PM
Retreat Sunday April 23, 2017, 1:00PM-5:00PM

Course Description

Mindful Self-Compassion or “MSC” is an empirically-supported 8-week training program developed by Drs. Chris Germer and Kristin Neff.  It helps participants cultivate the mental and emotional habit of mindful self-compassion by learning the process of infusing our moment-to-moment experience with kindness, especially when we feel frustrated, hurt, inadequate, or overwhelmed. Mindful self-compassion is the first step in emotional healing—being able to be-friend oneself, turn inwardly and acknowledge our difficult thoughts and feelings with a spirit of openness, curiosity and love, rather than self-judgment, or self-criticism.Perhaps most importantly, cultivating self-compassion means that we honor and accept our humanness. Things will not always go the way we want them to. We often encounter frustrations and losses. We make mistakes and bump up against our limitations, or fall short of our ideals. This is the human condition, a reality shared by us all. The more we open our heart to this reality instead of constantly fighting against it, the more we will be able to feel compassion for ourselves and all our fellow humans.

Research has shown that self-compassion greatly enhances emotional well-being. It boosts resilience, happiness, reduces anxiety and depression, and can even help maintain healthy lifestyle habits such as diet and exercise. Being both mindful and compassionate leads to greater ease and well-being in our daily lives. MSC can be learned by anyone. It’s the practice of recognizing moments of difficulty, and repeatedly evoking good will toward ourselves. It extends cultivation of that same desire beyond ourselves to all living beings to live happily and free from suffering.

In the weekly program, participants will learn through activities such as meditation, experiential exercises, short presentations, group discussion and home practices. Learning is mostly experiential and includes current theory and research on self-compassion. 

Class Dates

8-week course on Thursday evenings for 2.5 hours
March 16 – May 4, 2017 from 6:00 - 8:30pm
Retreat: Sunday, April 23, 2017, 1:00pm - 5:00pm

Course Fees

$360.00 regular registration
$365.00: Registration with a certificate of completion to use for CEUs
$270.00 (25% off): UW Affiliate Registration, which requires department approval and budget number

Scholarships and income-based reduced fee options available. Please see the registration page for details, or email mindful@uw.edu

About the Instructors

Yaffa Maritz
Yaffa Maritz, LMHC is a co-founder of Listening Mothers and clinical director of both Listening Mothers and Reflective Parenting, two research based parenting programs. She is the founder and director of the Community of Mindful Parenting. Yaffa was born and trained in Israel as a clinical psychologist. She is also a licensed mental health counselor with advanced training in infant mental health. She is an advocate for the well-being of children and their families and served on several local and national boards that promote this agenda, including the Governor’s Commission for Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention. Yaffa believes that by supporting parents and creating nurturing communities for them, we can set the foundation for the positive growth of children’s social, emotional, and mental health. 

Yaffa participated in the Stanford yearlong teachers training program called CCT (Compassion Cultivation Training) that was offered through Stanford's Center for Compassion, Altruism, Research and Education. She also completed the advanced training program in MSC (Mindful Self-Compassion) with Drs. Kristin Neff and Chris Germer.  

Blair Carleton
Blair Carleton is a Recovery Coach trained by Washington State and the Connecticut Center for Addiction Recovery (CCAR).  She received her MSC Teacher Certificate from UCSD’s Center for Mindful Self-Compassion.  Blair studied Shame-Resilience with Brene Brown, and went on to teach the curriculum just as Dr. Brown’s first TED talk went viral.  But it was after a weekend workshop at CCFW that she fell head over heels in love with Dr. Kristin Neff’s pioneering research on Self-Compassion.  Blair studied with both founders of Mindful Self-Compassion, Dr. Neff and Dr. Chris Germer, a clinician at Harvard Medical School.  She received her B.A. from Yale University.

Blair has taught MSC to all walks of life: every single time she teaches, she is filled with gratitude to watch people enhance their own lives before her very eyes. She credits her beloved practice of Mindfulness to her teachers: Dr. Keesha Ewers, Ajayan Borys, Sylvia Boorstein and Joel and Michelle Levey. She is tickled pink to be teaching with Yaffa Maritz, her friend, colleague, and the one who taught her 8-week MSC course at CCFW.

Saturday, March 18, 2017
Professional Events
Sharon Stanley, Ph.D.
9:00am - 5:00pm  »  CCFW

Overview
This workshop will provide participants with the knowledge and insight necessary to recognize the physical, mental, and emotional effects of historical trauma and cultural legacies of resilience. We will explore strategies to support clients in working through this trauma, as well as self-care practices to manage the contagious effects of unresolved trauma. 

Registration is required. Please register here.

Background

Research demonstrates that the emotional and physical effects of trauma can be traced to historical experiences of slavery, oppression, war, immigration, poverty and other dehumanizing events. The intergenerational transmission of trauma radically disrupts the autonomic nervous system, resulting in chronic patterns of intense emotion, destructive behavior and physical illness. Knowledge of this trauma can enable mental health practitioners to support clients in identifying and regulated their disrupted emotional states.

In addition, while treating traumatized clients, mental health practitioners are vulnerable to the contagion of unresolved trauma. Awareness of the personal effects of historical adversity allows self-compassion and creativity to break the bonds of traumatic suffering that are held in immobilizing states of shame and powerlessness. With self-compassion and other mindful somatic practices, practitioners can strengthen their resiliency to the effects of vicarious trauma. This enhanced resiliency bolsters their effectiveness working with clients and prevents compassion fatigue and burn-out.

Workshop Format and Objectives

This workshop will include research presentations, reflective processing, dyadic practice, group discussion, and videos to explore the following topics:

  • Introduction to intergenerational trauma
  • Epigenesis and Attachment Processes
  • Experiences of specific cultural groups and trauma-related responses
  • Cultural traditions for regulation and resilience
  • Changing neurological patterns of dysregulation
  • Somatic practices to enhance self-compassion

At the end of the workshop, participants will recognize the physical, mental and emotional effects of historical trauma as well as cultural-based legacies for survival and healing. This knowledge can enhance self-compassion to shift a sense of shame, judgment and helplessness regarding distressing behavior. With self-compassion comes an empowered ability to care for the self and others by regulating the autonomic nervous system. As participants enter into mindful relational connection within themselves and others, we will identify sensations that indicate neural dysregulation and explore bodily based interventions they are able to achieve inner compassion, calm, creativity and productive social engagement.   

About the Presenter

Sharon Stanley, Ph.D. is an educator and psychotherapist in the field of trauma and has developed creative, body-centered relational practices to regulate and transform the physical and emotional reactions that come with adversity.  Her integration of current research in interpersonal neurobiology and ancient indigenous and traditional wisdom are at the core of her recent book published by Routledge, "Relational and Body-Centered Practices for Healing Trauma: Lifting the Burdens of the Past". Sharon has spent many years teaching somatic psychotherapy for healing historical trauma to First Nations People in Canada, psychiatrists in Israel and psychotherapists in Belfast Ireland. Sharon leads educational seminars for practitioners working with people with trauma and has a small psychotherapy practice on Bainbridge Island, Washington. Learn more about Sharon and Somatic Transformation at: www.somatictransformation.com

Fees and Workshop Details

The workshop is Saturday, March 18, 2017, 9:00am – 5:00pm. Participants will have a one-hour lunch break. There are several places to eat within walking distance of CCFW. Or feel free to bring your lunch. You are welcome to use our kitchen which has a refrigerator and a microwave. 

This workshop will be limited to 25 people.

Fees:

$190.00 regular registration (includes certificate of completion for CEUs)
$142.50 (25% off): UW Affiliate Registration, which requires department approval and budget number

Scholarships and income-based reduced fee options available. Please see the registration page for details, or email mindful@uw.edu

Tuesday, March 21, 2017
Courses and Workshops
Elizabeth Lin, MD, MPH
6:00pm - 8:30pm  »  CCFW

Please review this note from Dr. Lin BEFORE registering to ensure that this class will be a proper fit for your needs.

Registration is required. Please register here

Tuesdays, March 21 – May 9, 2017, 6:00pm – 8:30pm
Retreat Sunday April 30, 8:30am – 3:00pm

Course Description

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a scientifically supported program developed by Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph.D. to reduce stress and increase well-being. It is flourishing worldwide. This 8 –week course combines contemplative practices based in Eastern philosophy, western psychology, and cutting-edge neuroscience.  Attitudes of kindness, acceptance and patience provide a foundation for the practices of sustained focus, self-regulation and self-exploration. A greater sense of balance, choice and freedom is cultivated.

Benefits of MBSRParticipants have remarked, “Mindfulness has changed how I live and see the world, how I interact with others”. This course contributes to:

1. Reduced stress and chronic pain
2. Improved mood
3. Overcoming sleep problems
4. Decreased anxiety
5. Increased immunity
6. Enhanced resilience, joy, and compassion
7. Healthy aging

In this 8-week experiential course consisting of weekly classes, and home practices, participants will learn exercises to:

1. Increase awareness of body sensations (body scan)
2. Mindful movement and stretching (yoga)
3. Awareness of pleasant and unpleasant experiences
4. Awareness of thoughts and emotions
5. Increase compassion for ourselves and others
6. Latest research on mind-body response to stress and change
7. Practices to cultivate mindfulness throughout the day, living each moment to its fullest

Course Dates

8-week course on Tuesday evenings for 2.5 hours
March 21 – May 9, 2017 from 6:00 - 8:30pm
Retreat: Sunday, April 30,  8:30am – 3:00pm

Course Fees

$350.00: Regular registration
$355.00: Registration with clock hours or a certificate of completion to use for CEUs
$262.50 (25% off): UW Affiliate Registration, which requires department approval and budget number

Scholarships and income-based reduced fee options available. Please see the registration page for details, or email mindful@uw.edu

About the Instructor

Elizabeth H. B. Lin, MD, MPH. Elizabeth is a family medicine physician, clinical professor at the School of Medicine, University of Washington, and an affiliate scientific investigator at the Group Health Research Institute. As a physician researcher, Elizabeth and her team have conducted innovative research to improve mind-body health in general medical settings, which have been adopted worldwide. Elizabeth has had a daily meditation practice for more than 25 years.  She has trained extensively with leaders in mindfulness programs, and began teaching Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction 4 years ago. She has trained with Drs. Chris Germer and Kristen Neff, to become a teacher in Mindful Self-Compassion.  

Comments from past participants in Dr. Lin's classes

"Dr. Lin is a wonderful, caring, respectful and well-prepared instructor and did a fantastic job teaching this class. I particularly appreciated her taking time to answer questions in a thoughtful way. This, along with the content of what she said, was most enlightening for me, because I have begun to pause and take more time in my own communications with other people." 

"Elizabeth is a welcoming and receptive instructor and communicated her own enthusiasm for a mindfulness approach to life in general. I liked how she used her own experience as a student of mindfulness over many years." 

"Elizabeth is very thoughtful, non-judgmental, humble, and caring."

“You (Elizabeth) truly are gifted at drawing people together and toward our best selves!”

“I did not expect the life-changing experience that it (the class) turned out to be. Thank you for giving me back to my family and myself.”

Sunday, March 26, 2017
Courses and Workshops
Ann Hollar, M.Ed.
4:00pm - 5:15pm  »  CCFW

Registration is required. Please register here

Sundays, March 26 - May 7, 2017, 4:00 – 5:15pm
Note: there is no class on April 16

Course Description

Is your teen driven to distraction? Overwhelmed with keeping up socially on-line and off? Stressed about homework? Caught up in negative thinking? In this six week course we will touch on many aspects of mindfulness that will help your teen navigate these exciting and complex high school years. This course is intended for high school aged teenagers (14-19 years old). Class size will range between 10 and 20 students. 

Last year, 100% of teens who took this class at CCFW said they would recommend it to a friend. Mindfulness helped...

  • 100% of the class calm down when upset or stressed
  • 93% be better listeners
  • 79% make better decisions
  • 71% avoid fights or arguments

After taking Mindfulness 101, teens said: 

"I use at least one thing I learned in the mindfulness class every day, and it's been very helpful to keep my mind organized and keep myself centered. The breathing exercises help me relax in stressful situations."

"Mindfulness helps me focus and relax at the same time. The class was great since it was all high school students with the same pressures of homework, tests and friends. The lessons and meditation help me find calm and step back to see the bigger picture."

"I learned how to listen to others way better (friends, family, teachers). The breathing exercise also helps me fall asleep."

"Life can be overwhelming and this helps a lot."

"Mindfulness has helped me put more effort into trying to discern what is real vs. imagined."

"If I just focus on one thing at a time I am better off."

"I was pretty upset going to a class at school, and I used mindful walking to calm down."

"Bad grade on a quiz - I acknowledged sadness but didn't let it hold me back. Missed a shot in soccer - moved past it and scored."

"Ann's class made learning about mediation not only relatable but also enjoyable. I looked forward to going to her class as well as employing her methods in circumstances that I normally would have been unsure of what to do in. Working with Ann was a pleasure, and I look forward to continuing the use of mediation in stressful and foreign circumstances. Thank you Ann!"

Schedule

Sundays, 4:00 - 5:15pm
March 26 – May 7, 2017
Note: there is no class on April 16

Week 1 March 26: Brain, Body, Breath - Understanding the basics

Week 2 April 2: Home Sweet Home - Creating a sense of ease within ourselves

Week 3 April 9: Driven to Distraction - Learning how to focus attention

Week 4 April 23: Making Sense of your Senses - Slowing down and noticing

Week 5 April 30: Riding the Storm - Being with, not thrown, by strong emotions

Week 6 May 7: Giving Thanks - The power of gratitude and kindness

Course Fees

$175.00: Regular registration
$131.25 (25% off): UW Affiliate Registration, which requires department approval and budget number

Scholarships and income-based reduced fee options available. Please see the registration page for details, or email mindful@uw.edu

About the Instructor

Ann Hollar is a mindfulness instructor in Seattle. She has a M. Ed from the University of Washington, focusing her thesis on “Mindfulness in Education:  The Secular Intersection of Buddhism and Neuroscience.” She currently teaches mindfulness to students in both public and private elementary, middle and high schools. She has been trained in both the MindUp and Mindful Schools curricula and has recently completed Mindful Schools Year-Long Instructor Certification Program. Her personal integration of mindfulness is constantly being kept alive via interactions with her three tween and teenaged boys.

"Thank you for creating a safe, nurturing space for our children to establish their own practice of mindfulness and appreciation. Through your course, we saw a gentle shift as our kids practiced noticing their thoughts, focusing their attention, and expanding their capacity for gratitude. Having "homework" helped them naturally establish a practice that carried over long after your classes were complete. Thank you for laying the groundwork for a practice that can help them through the inevitable stress of adolescence and beyond."

"Our daughter loved learning ways to relax and de -stress from Ann. She creates a safe, compassionate community where our daughter found inner peace."  

"Students are experiencing higher levels of stress and Ann's class offers strategies and alternatives which allow them to feel less anxious, more balanced and more capable of managing the stress." 

Monday, April 10, 2017
Drop-in Meditation Sessions
Diane Hetrick
6:00pm - 7:00pm  »  CCFW

Drop-in meditation sessions are free. Registration is required. Please register here.

CCFW is pleased to offer monthly drop-in meditation sessions. A different CCFW instructor will lead each month’s session so that participants can experience different mindfulness practices and instructor styles. These sessions are also intended to support participants from previous mindfulness courses in strengthening their home practice. All levels of experience are welcome.

About this Session:

We'll explore the art and science of how mindfulness helps us to increase our compassion for ourselves and others. Diane will share highlights of the latest research showing the relationship between mindfulness and compassion; offer some practical ideas of how to increase these qualities in the day to day of your life; and you'll have a chance to experience a guided meditation practice.
 

About the Instructor

Diane Hetrick has been studying and practicing in the areas of mind-body healing, mindfulness, meditation, and compassion cultivation most of her adult life. Her more than 30 years of experience as a Physical Therapist working with patients with chronic pain and/or illnesses lead her to explore various body and movement practices, including yoga, dance and qigong, and to explore the area of Mindfulness meditation, in order to help people with stress, pain or dysfunction find more ease, and well-being in their lives.

She completed the Certificate in Mindfulness Facilitation training through the Mindfulness Awareness Research Center (MARC) at UCLA. After completing the Compassion Cultivation Training (CCT) Teacher Certification Program, offered through the Center for Compassion, Altruism, Research and Education (CCARE) at Stanford, she became one of the first certified CCT teachers in the Seattle area. More at: http://www.dianehetrick.com/

Friday, April 28, 2017
Special Events
2017 Mindfulness Research Conference
April 28: 8:30am - 8:30pm | April 29: 8:00am - 4:30pm  »  Center for Urban Horticulture, 3501 NE 41st St., Seattle, Washington, 98105

This conference is co-hosted by the Centers for Child and Family Well-Being at the University of Washington and University of Wisconsin, Madison.

This meeting will bring together researchers and practitioners whose work promotes the well-being of children and families through mindfulness.  The latest research findings and their applications will be presented, with rich opportunities for discussion and networking. The focus is on advancing the science of mindfulness to enhance children’s well-being. This will be an intimate conference with limited registration.

For additional details, please visit the conference webpage.

Thursday, May 11, 2017
Courses and Workshops
Diane Hetrick
6:00pm - 8:00pm  »  CCFW

Registration is required. Please register here

May 11 – June 29, 2017, 6:00 - 8:00pm

Course Description

Compassion Cultivation Training is an eight-week course designed to develop the qualities of compassion, empathy and kindness for oneself and others. The course, developed by a team of contemplative scholars, clinical psychologists and researchers at Stanford University, combines traditional contemplative practices with contemporary psychology and scientific research on compassion and is offered in a secular presentation.

The training includes:

• Mindfulness: Daily meditation, visualization and breathing practices to develop loving-kindness, empathy and compassion.

• Coursework: Two-hour weekly classes that include lecture, discussion and in-class listening and communication exercises with partners and small groups.

• Assignments: Real-world homework to help you practice compassionate thought and action.

In this course, individuals will learn how to:

• Increase kindness and compassion for themselves and others

• Develop deeper levels of serenity, resilience and creativity

• Calm the mind and direct thoughts more positively

• Sharpen their ability to focus and pay attention

• Access a variety of self-care skills and techniques

Cultivating compassion goes beyond feeling more concern and empathy for others. It develops the strength to be with suffering, the courage to take compassionate action, and resilience in the face of life’s challenges. Each of us can nurture and grow our compassionate instinct, like a plant carefully cultivated from a seed. This process requires patience, steady care, proper tools and a supportive environment.

Course Dates

8-week course on Thursday evenings for 2 hours
May 11 – June 29, 2017, 6:00 - 8:00pm

Course Fees

$300.00: Regular registration
$305.00: Registration with a certificate of completion to use for CEUs
$225.00 (25% off): UW Affiliate Registration, which requires department approval and budget number

Scholarships and income-based reduced fee options available. Please see the registration page for details, or email mindful@uw.edu

About the Instructor

Diane Hetrick has been studying and practicing in the areas of mind-body healing, mindfulness, meditation, and compassion cultivation most of her adult life. Her more than 30 years of experience as a Physical Therapist working with patients with chronic pain and/or illnesses lead her to explore various body and movement practices, including yoga, dance and qigong, and to explore the area of Mindfulness meditation, in order to help people with stress, pain or dysfunction find more ease, and well-being in their lives.

She completed the Certificate in Mindfulness Facilitation training through the Mindfulness Awareness Research Center (MARC) at UCLA. After completing the Compassion Cultivation Training (CCT) Teacher Certification Program, offered through the Center for Compassion, Altruism, Research and Education (CCARE) at Stanford, she became one of the first certified CCT teachers in the Seattle area. More at: http://www.dianehetrick.com/