Professional Events

Photo credit: U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Food Nutrition Service (FNS) Women, Infants, and Children Program (WIC) 

This professional lecture series will review the state of research on each topic, provide participants with suggested readings, and introduce short practices to share with clients and patients. These events are tailored for health and mental health workers, teachers, and others serving children and their families. Two Continuing Education Units (CEUs) are available for each seminar upon completion of assigned readings and a short quiz. 

All lectures in the fall are focused on mindfulness, children, and parents. The cost is $40.00 per session. UW Affilitate price $30 per session (25% discount).

Signup for all four sessions in the fall and receive at 15% discount for $135.00 total (four sessions would normally be $160 if purchased individually). Please note that the package of 4 sessions must be purchased in the beginning, before the first lecture. Offer expires 9/27/16.  

Tuesday, December 13, 2016
Tuesday, December 13, 2016
Felice Orlich, PhD
6:00 - 7:30 pm
CCFW

Registration is require. Please register here

About the Presenter

Dr. Felice Orlich is a pediatric neuropsychologist and the Director of Community Outreach at Seattle Children’s Hospital. She is Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington Medical School and an attending at Seattle Children’s Hospital. She has been integrally involved in developing and implementing start-of-the-art models of care for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) across the lifespan for the past 17 years. Her research is focused on improving quality of life in individuals with ASD. She is interested in how integrative treatment approaches, spanning the community, clinic and home environments improve outcomes for individuals with ASD.

Tuesday, November 22, 2016
Tuesday, November 22, 2016
Lenna L. Liu, MD, MPH
6:00 - 7:30 pm
CCFW

Consider viewing childhood obesity through a different lens of mindfulness and mindful eating. Experience mindful eating practices and get some ideas to incorporate into your practice.  This event will be led by Dr. Lenna Liu. 

Registration is required. Please register here.

About the Presenter

Lenna L. Liu, MD, MPH is a Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine and Seattle Children’s Hospital. She practices general pediatrics at Odessa Brown Children’s Clinic. Dr. Liu is active locally and nationally on childhood obesity prevention and management efforts, particularly with an emphasis on health disparities and low-income populations.  She is the physician lead for the Seattle Children’s Obesity Program which includes clinical services, education, research and advocacy. She is also trained in yoga, meditation and mindfulness and working to bring mindfulness and mindful eating to pediatrics and obesity prevention.

Tuesday, October 25, 2016
Tuesday, October 25, 2016
Liliana Lengua, PhD
6:00 - 7:30 pm
CCFW

Learn about this growing research area and discuss relevant studies on the effects of mindfulness on parents and their children. We will also learn how mindfulness can be shared with families in community settings, including early learning setting.

Registration is required. Please register here

About the Presenter

Liliana Lengua, Ph.D., UW Professor of Psychology and director of the Center for Child and Family Well-Being, is a child clinical psychologist and a mother of 3 children. She is an internationally recognized expert on children's vulnerable and resilient responses to stress, demonstrating how paretning and children's temperament contributes to children's unique responses to stress. She is also recognized for her research on the effects of stress and disadvantage on parenting and children's social-emotional development, and has developed an evidenced-based parenting program infused with mindfulness practices to enhance parenting effectiveness. She has been the principal investigator of several federally funded research projects and is the author of over 80 published papers. She serves on the steering committee for the CDC funded Washington State Essentials for Childhood Initiative, collaborates with the Harvard Center for the Developing Child Frontiers of Innovation, and serves on the board of trustees for Neighborhood House, a private, nonprofit and anti-poverty organization. 

Tuesday, September 27, 2016
Tuesday, September 27, 2016
Robyn Long, MA, E-RYT
6:00 - 7:30 pm
CCFW

Review studies related to mindfulness and pediatric populations, and learn about the types of mindfulness programs offered for this population. We will also discuss strategies for sharing mindfulness with children and youth and learn basic practices. 

Registration is required. Please register here

About the Presenter

Robyn leads CCFW’s community outreach and dissemination efforts. She has completed several teacher-training programs in yoga and mindfulness, including specialized courses for children, youth, cancer, trauma, disabilities, and pregnancy. Prior to joining CCFW, she facilitated community-research yoga programs for pediatric cancer patients and their families at the University of Calgary. At Perkins School for the Blind she developed and led a yoga program for children and teens with visual impairment and deafblindness. Robyn has also led global partnership-building initiatives at the Harvard School of Public Health and facilitated mindfulness and health programs for refugees in the Middle East. 

Friday, April 15, 2016
Cynthia Price, PhD MA LMP
10:00am - 5:00pm
CCFW Room 151

Registration is required. Please register here.

Course Description: 
Mindful attention to the body, involving interoceptive awareness (i.e. awareness of inner body sensations), is a powerful tool for regulation and self-care. For health professionals, mindful body awareness can be useful to facilitate presence in your practice and to protect against burn-out.  These tools may also be useful to your clients, particularly those who are highly stressed or anxious, or disconnected from their bodies due to physical or emotional pain, or trauma.  In this one-day class you will learn some simple mindful body awareness tools to use in your practice for self-care, and these same tools can also be taught to your clients to facilitate their own awareness and self-care.   

Date: Friday, April 15, 2016 from 10am – 5pm.

Minimum enrollment: 10; Max enrollment: 20

About the Instructor:
Cynthia Price, Ph.D., M.A., LMP is a Research Assoc. Professor at the University of Washington. Cynthia's research and clinical expertise is in the acquisition of interoceptive awareness. In private practice for 20 years, she developed Mindful Awareness in Body-oriented Therapy (MABT) to teach interoceptive awareness and related skills for self-care and emotion regulation.  Her research program is focused on studying the efficacy and mechanisms of MABT for distressed populations.  The majority of her work focuses on community-based research for individuals who are disconnected from their bodies due to substance use, trauma or pain. She is the Director of the Center for Mindful Body Awareness (http://cmbaware.org/), a non-profit focused on teaching MABT, and integrating mindful body awareness education into programs for underserved populations. 

Saturday, December 6, 2014
Molly Lawlor, M.A., Ph.D. Candidate
9a-12p
CCFW

Registration is required (closes 12/5/15). Please register here.

In this session, participants will be introduced to mindfulness, commonly defined as an open, non-judgmental awareness to the present moment. The application of mindfulness practices for children will be discussed within the framework of Social Emotional Learning (SEL). The latest research within the emerging field of mindfulness practice with children will be presented along with considerations for implementation in the classroom context. Participants will be offered experiential learning with guided mindfulness practice. Concepts will be expanded to discuss practical tools for children and how these can be implemented within the classroom context to support mindful awareness, social emotional competencies, and increased engagement.

Molly Lawlor, M.A. is the primary author of the Mind-Up program, a trainer for the program and a PhD candidate at the University of British Columbia. Her research includes, but not limited to, the effects of mindfulness-based education on pre- and early adolescents' well-being and social and emotional competence. Specifically, Molly is investigating prosocialness, mindfulness and psychological adjustment in children and adolescents. Currently, Molly is the Director of Curriculum for Taxi Dog Education, a multi-sensory social-emotional learning program. Molly will speak to the role of mindfulness in education, specific to social and emotional learning and self-regulation.

Friday, March 6, 2015 to Saturday, April 25, 2015
Christa Turksma, DRS
Fridays (3/6 and 3/20) from 5 - 8:30p and Saturdays (3/7, 3/21, and 4/25) from 8:30a - 3:30p
CCFW

Registration is required (closes 3/5/15). Please register here.

Group rates: 
Schools that register 3 or 4 teachers can receive 15% off the listed fees
Schools that register 5+ teachers can receive 25% off the listed fees
Please e-mail mindful@uw.edu for a discount code

Co-leaders: Rebecca Cortes, Ph.D. and Ann Hollar, M.Ed.

Course consists of two half-day training sessions, two full-day training sessions, and a follow-up booster session. 

CARE (Cultivating Awareness and Resilience in Education) is a research based professional development program.  It was developed at the Garrison Institute by Patricia (Tish) Jennings, Associate Professor of Elementary Education at the Curry School of Education, VA, Richard C Brown, an educator  and  founder of the Contemplative Education Department at Naropa  University and Christa Turksma, a clinical psychologist and former elementary school principal.
 

Care is designed to teach teachers stress reducing techniques and ways to better understand and manage their emotions so they can create and maintain supportive learning environments, reduce burnout and attrition, and build strong relationships with their students to promote positive academic and behavioral outcomes.

Watch "Why CARE for Teachers Matters."

Friday, April 25, 2014 to Saturday, May 10, 2014
Christa Turksma
Fridays (4/25 and 5/9) from 5 - 8:30p and Saturdays (4/26 and 5/10) from 8:30a - 3:30p
CCFW

Registration is required. Please register here.

Course consists of two half-day training sessions, two full-day training sessions, and a follow-up (TBD, Mid-June). 

CARE (Cultivating Awareness and Resilience in Education) is a research based professional development program.  It was developed at the Garrison Institute by Patricia (Tish) Jennings, Associate Professor of Elementary Education at the Curry School of Education, VA, Richard C Brown, an educator  and  founder of the Contemplative Education Department at Naropa  University and Christa Turksma, a clinical psychologist and former elementary school principal.

Care is designed to teach teachers stress reducing techniques and ways to better understand and manage their emotions so they can create and maintain supportive learning environments, reduce burnout and attrition, and build strong relationships with their students to promote positive academic and behavioral outcomes.

Watch "Why CARE for Teachers Matters."

Friday, May 3, 2013
Susan Kaiser Greenland
7:00 - 8:30 pm
UW Kane Hall 110

Registration is required. Click here to register.

Susan Kaiser Greenland, author of The Mindful Child, provides an introduction to the practice of mindfulness for children and young adults and its applications at home, in schools and in the caring professions. It focuses on the Inner Kids program, with age-appropriate and secular activities that help children from pre-kindergarten through young adult incorporate the new ABCs - attention, balance, and compassion - into their daily lives. The Inner Kids mindfulness practices you will learn develop greater mind-body awareness, manage and reduce stress, and can easily be adapted for home, afterschool programs, or private therapy and healthcare practice.

Susan Kaiser Greenland is a former corporate attorney who developed the Inner Kids mindful awareness program for children, teens and their families. Research on the Inner Kids elementary school program was conducted at the Mindful Awareness Research Center at UCLA and is published in the Journal of Applied School Psychology. Susan is author of The Mindful Child: How to Help Your Kid Manage Stress and Become
Happier, Kinder, and More Compassionate 
(Free Press, 2010). She teaches children, parents and professionals around the world and consults with various organizations on teaching mindful awareness in an age-appropriate and secular manner. With her husband, Seth Greenlandshe co-founded the Mindfulness Together Foundation (formerly known as the Inner Kids Foundation).  Susan lives in Los Angeles with her husband, and their two children. She can be found online at www.susankaisergreenland.com

See her recent interview: What is a Mindful Child?

Saturday, December 7, 2013
Kristin Neff, Ph.D.
8:30- 12:30 pm
UW CCFWB

For many years self-esteem was seen to be the key to psychological health. However, research psychologists have identified several downsides to the endless pursuit of self-esteem such as constant social comparisons, and instability of self-worth. Research suggests that self-compassion is a healthier way of relating to oneself, offering all the benefits of self-esteem without its downsides. Self-compassion involves treating ourselves kindly, like we would a good friend we cared about. Rather than continually judging and evaluating ourselves, self-compassion involves generating kindness toward ourselves as imperfect humans, and learning to be present with the inevitable struggles of life with greater ease. It motivates us to make needed changes in our lives not because we’re worthless or inadequate, but because we care about ourselves and want to lessen our suffering. This workshop will provide simple tools for responding in a kind, compassionate way whenever we are experiencing painful emotions. We all want to avoid pain, but letting it in—and responding compassionately to our own imperfections without harsh self-condemnation—are essential steps toward living happier, more fulfilling lives. Through discussion, meditation, and experiential exercises, you will gain practical skills to help bring self-compassion into you daily life. You will learn how to stop being so hard on yourself; handle difficult emotions with greater ease; and motivate yourself with kindness rather than criticism. Practices will also be introduced to help ease stress for caregivers. This course is relevant for the general public as well as to practicing mental health professionals and educators.

Kristin Neff, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Human Development and Culture at the University of Texas at Austin. She is a pioneer in the field of self-compassion research, conducting the first empirical studies on self-compassion over a decade ago. In addition to writing numerous academic articles on the topic, she is author of the book "Self-Compassion," released by William Morrow in 2011. Kristin’s work has received extensive media coverage, including the New York Times, MSNBC, National Public Radio, Reader’s Digest, and Psychology Today. She offers workshops on self-compassion worldwide, and has developed an eight-week program to help people learn to be more self-compassionate in daily life. Information on self-compassion - including videos, guided meditations, exercises, research articles, and a way to test your own self-compassion level – is available at www.self-compassion.org. Kristin is also featured in the bestselling book and award-winning documentary The Horse Boy (www.horseboyworld.com), which chronicles her family’s journey to Mongolia where they trekked on horseback to find healing for her autistic son.

She can be found online at www.self-compassion.org

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