Services

The Roche Linear Array is a qualitative test that detects 37 high- and low-risk human papillomavirus genotypes, including those considered a significant risk factor for HSIL progression to cervical cancer.

HHV8 Real Time Quantitative PCR on all types of sample: Plasma, Serum, Saliva, Swabs, Whole Blood, etc.

The Real-time cytomegalovirus (CMV) assay is an in vitro Taqman based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the quantitation of CMV DNA in human plasma or whole blood. The assay is intended for use in conjunction with clinical presentation and other laboratory markers as an indicator of initiation of therapy and for use as an aid in monitoring viral response to antiviral treatment as measured by changes in plasma or whole blood DNA levels. This assay is not intended to be used as a screening test for CMV or as a diagnostic test to confirm the presence of CMV infection.

Epstein Barr Virus may be detected in a wide variety of clinical specimens including saliva, plasma, serum, oral swabs, and other bodily fluids. This virus has long been known to be associated with Burkitt ’s lymphoma, a malignancy that is decidedly present and of great clinical significance in sub-Saharan Africa. HIV increases the risk of developing Burkitt's Lymphoma as well as complicating its treatment.

Both the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Viral Load Assays utilize an in vitro Taqman based polymerase chain reaction or Reverse Transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR for HBV and RT-PCR for HCV) assay for the quantitation of HCV and HBV in Plasma or Serum. The tests can be ordered separately. The HCV assay delivers accurate quantification of genotypes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 in IU’s/mL with a minimum sample input volume of 0.5mL.

Contact: kmaggard@fredhutch.org

HIV Associated Malignancies Core

About

Cancer has become the leading cause of death among persons with HIV infection worldwide. Originally recognized as an “AIDS-Defining Condition”, cancer now impacts persons living with HIV both at the time of diagnosis and as a consequence of long-term HIV infection. Importantly, comorbid HIV infection is associated with more than 2-fold increased risk of death among persons with cancer compared with persons of the same age, gender, and stage of cancer without HIV infection. Despite more than 3 decades of recognizing an association between HIV and cancer, significant gaps remain in our knowledge about the etiology, natural history and treatment of HIV-associated malignancies (HIVAM). To address these gaps, we propose to continue to foster and strengthen research in the Seattle and International HIV community to HIVAM through the following specific aims:

Specific Aim 1: To enhance the quality and quantity of data collected about the incidence, etiology, natural history and sequelae of cancer arising among persons with HIV infection to inform studies in both cancer prevention and treatment.

Specific Aim 2: To facilitate the collection and distribution of biospecimens suitable for translational studies of the biology of HIVAM through a biorepository.

Specific Aim 3: To develop and deploy novel laboratory assays for the study of HIVAM and disseminate these assays to the CFAR research community.

For the past five years, the HIVAM Core has continued to cultivate research in HIVAM in the Seattle research community through the provision of assistance with developing laboratory assays and data tools for the study of cancer in persons with HIV. We have continued to grow the number of researchers in this field and now have a membership of nearly 50 individuals. Several junior investigators have initiated independent research careers in the field of HIVAM with the support of the UW/Fred Hutch CFAR, which has contributed to the UW/Fred Hutch CFAR’s theme of developing the next generation of leaders. Further, the NIH funding base for research in HIVAM has grown to over $15 million, and several grants, including K23s, R21s, R01s, P01s, and U54s have been awarded to HIVAM members, furthering the CFAR’s mission of adding value to the local research community. Finally, a suite of laboratory and data tools have helped to potentiate work in HIVAM across our campuses.

Services
Services

The Roche Linear Array is a qualitative test that detects 37 high- and low-risk human papillomavirus genotypes, including those considered a significant risk factor for HSIL progression to cervical cancer.

HHV8 Real Time Quantitative PCR on all types of sample: Plasma, Serum, Saliva, Swabs, Whole Blood, etc.

The Real-time cytomegalovirus (CMV) assay is an in vitro Taqman based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the quantitation of CMV DNA in human plasma or whole blood. The assay is intended for use in conjunction with clinical presentation and other laboratory markers as an indicator of initiation of therapy and for use as an aid in monitoring viral response to antiviral treatment as measured by changes in plasma or whole blood DNA levels. This assay is not intended to be used as a screening test for CMV or as a diagnostic test to confirm the presence of CMV infection.

Epstein Barr Virus may be detected in a wide variety of clinical specimens including saliva, plasma, serum, oral swabs, and other bodily fluids. This virus has long been known to be associated with Burkitt ’s lymphoma, a malignancy that is decidedly present and of great clinical significance in sub-Saharan Africa. HIV increases the risk of developing Burkitt's Lymphoma as well as complicating its treatment.

Both the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Viral Load Assays utilize an in vitro Taqman based polymerase chain reaction or Reverse Transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR for HBV and RT-PCR for HCV) assay for the quantitation of HCV and HBV in Plasma or Serum. The tests can be ordered separately. The HCV assay delivers accurate quantification of genotypes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 in IU’s/mL with a minimum sample input volume of 0.5mL.

Contact: kmaggard@fredhutch.org

Activities

The HIVAM Core operates not only in the context of the Global Oncology program at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, but also at the new UCI/Fred Hutch Cancer Centre facility in Kampala, Uganda. The Core uses nearly 9,000 square feet of Biorepository and Laboratory space, including dedicated space for molecular diagnostics, histopathology, immunology, and clinical chemistry / hematology.

The Biorepository offers specimen processing (standard plasma, serum, and buffy coat separation, PBMC isolation by Ficoll separation, granulocyte isolation, solid tissue formalin fixing, snap-freezing of tissues and cells, and cryopreservation capabilities) and storage in a variety of conditions: -20 Scientific Freezers, -80 Ultra Low Scientific Freezers, Liquid Nitrogen Storage Tanks, and controlled room temperature storage. Alarm systems and local laboratory staff monitor all of our storage equipment continuously.  The Biorepository staff are also able to assist with shipping of samples.

The Molecular Diagnostic Laboratory currently offers high-throughput DNA and RNA extraction, HHV8 Real Time Quantitative PCR and EBV Real Time Quantitative PCR. Additional commercial assays are available by request (e.g. gene expression, SNP Genotyping, and MiRNA Analysis) operated within a TaqMan-based PCR System (Life Technologies 7900, and 7500FAST).

The Core operations in Uganda can offer assistance with recruitment and enrollment of patients with HIV-associated cancers into clinical trials, facilitating histopathologic diagnosis and confirmation of cancer cases, and help with the development and refinement of tools and data instruments to incorporate malignancy research into planned or ongoing HIV research studies.

Capacity building continues for operations of the Histopathology and Immunology Laboratories in Kampala and Uganda. We will provide updates on the development of activities for these labs as the Core’s operations expand.

People

Director
Corey Casper , MD, MPH
Corey.Casper@idri.org

Associate Director
Warren Phipps, MD, MPH 
wtphipps@fredhutch.org

Associate Director
Manoj Menon, MD, MPH
mmenon@fredhutch.org

Core Laboratory Manager
James Ferrenberg
(206) 667-7779
jferrenb@fredhutch.org

Core Manager
Katie Maggard,
(206) 667-7838
kmaggard@fredhutch.org
 

Contact

Postal Mailing Address
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
UCI/Hutchinson Center Cancer Alliance
M1-B140
P.O. Box 19024
Seattle, WA 98109-1024

Shipping Address (FedEX, UPS, etc.)
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
UCI/Hutchinson Center Cancer Alliance
M1-B140, 1100 Fairview Avenue North
Seattle, WA 98109