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Center on Human Development and Disability
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CHDD is located on the Lake Washington Ship Canal

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Julie Craft Van De Weghe, Ph.D.

Acting Instructor of Pediatrics
Research Affiliate, Center on Human Development and Disability
julievdw@uw.edu
206-616-3788
University of Washington
Box 356320
Seattle, WA 98195-6320

Dr. Julie Craft Van De Weghe

Dr. Van De Weghe’s research focuses on the molecular mechanisms underlying ciliopathy conditions. Ciliopathies are rooted in primary cilia dysfunction. These organelles function as cellular antenna, receiving environmental and signaling cues. People with ciliopathies exhibit overlapping clinical features, including developmental delay, intellectual disability, polydactyly, retinal dystrophy, and progressive involvement of the kidney and liver. While individually rare, all ciliopathies combined affect ~1/500 individuals, making them one of the most common group of human genetic conditions. Each of the ~30 clinically-defined ciliopathies are associated with specific ciliary protein networks, although the mechanisms remain elusive. To tease apart the cellular pathophysiology, a combination of ciliary proteomics, genome engineering, and fixed and live microscopy in human cell models is employed, while leveraging UW's rich intellectual and developmental disability genetics resources.


For more information on Julie Craft Van De Weghe's research activities please see the University of Washington Hindbrain Malformation Research Program.


University of Washington • Center on Human Development and Disability • Box 357920 • Seattle WA 98195-7920 USA • 206-543-7701 • chdd@uw.edu