Mike Larsen Selected as Winner of the 2014 Eastman Chemical Student Award in Applied Polymer Science

Larsen 1Mike Larsen, a Ph.D. candidate working with Assistant Professor AJ Boydston, has been selected as the winner of the 2014 Eastman Chemical Student Award in Applied Polymer Science. Eastman Chemical partnered with the PMSE division of the American Chemical Society to offer this award in recognition of outstanding student achievement in the field of polymers and materials research. Applicants provided a copy of a recent publication, and finalists were selected to present a seminar at the 248th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society. Based upon the submitted papers and oral presentations, Mike Larsen was selected as this year’s awardee.

Final Examination – Dissertation Defense

FowbleCongratulations to Joseph W. Fowble, who successfully defended his Ph.D. work “Localization of the Human Malaria Parasite’s Dihydrofolate Reductase-Thymidylate Synthase and Examining Its Role in Proguanil and Atovaquone Drug Synergy” on June 5, 2014. Joe was a student in Pradip Rathod’s laboratory, working on several different projects during his time there. Joe obtained a BS in Chemistry from the University of Wisconsin in 2002, developed biochemistry skills in a Medicinal Chemistry lab at The Ohio State University until 2004, and worked with a start-up to establish anticancer drug screening prior to starting his Ph.D. at UW. He is looking forward to a short vacation before embarking on new scientific problems

Scott Rayermann Receives Alpha Epsilon Delta Teaching Excellence Award

RayermannAlpha Epsilon Delta (AED), an undergraduate premedical honor society at the University of Washington, has awarded Scott Rayermann the AED Teaching Excellence Award. Each year, AED seeks to recognize one professor and one teaching assistant who have made exceptional efforts in teaching. Mr. Rayermann was nominated and selected by student members of AED for his dedication and commitment to teaching their students.

Final Examination – Dissertation Defense

RobertoCongratulations to Michael F. Roberto, who successfully defended his Ph.D. work “Translation of a Chemical Reaction from Batch to Continuous Flow via Process Analytical Technology and Chemometrics” on May 30, 2014. Michael was a student in Brian Marquardt’s laboratory at the Applied Physics Laboratory for the last five years.  Michael obtained a BS in Chemistry from the University of Michigan in 2009. In July, Michael will start work at Infometrix Inc., in Bothell, WA. Michael looks forward to his upcoming career and is excited to continue to live in the Seattle area.

Final Examination – Dissertation Defense

MayJosephCongratulations to Joseph May, who defended his Ph.D. work “Theoretical Insight into the Manipulation of the Optical and Magnetic Properties of Transition-Metal-doped II-VI Semiconductor Quantum Dots” on May 6, 2014. As a student in Professor Xiaosong Li’s laboratory for the past five years, Joseph applied electronic structure theory to better understand the fundamental physics behind the effects transition-metal-dopants haveon the magnetic and optical properties of zinc oxide quantum dots. At the end of the month, he will be heading to Las Vegas to teach science at Mojave High School—go Rattlers! Joseph is excited to begin his new career as a science educator and return to his Southwest roots.

Final Examination – Dissertation Defense

ConnellyCongratulations to Samantha J. Connelly, who defended her Ph.D. work, “Preparation and Reactivity of Sigma-Complexes,” on February 20, 2014. Her work in the Heinekey Research Group focused on understanding the interaction between small molecules and transition metal complexes. Sam is excited to start her post-doc position at Pacific Northwest National Lab.

Final Examination – Dissertation Defense

KnestingCongratulations to Kristina Knesting, who defended her Ph.D. work “Polymer / Transparent Electrode Interface Studies with Applications for Organic Solar Cells” on September 23. Kristina was a student in Professor David Ginger’s group where she was a U.S. Department of Energy graduate fellow and studied how the interfaces in organic solar cells effect their performance. In the next few months she will be taking a short vacation before starting a career in industry.

Final Examination – Dissertation Defense

WhittakerCongratulations to Aaron Whittaker, who defended his Ph.D. work “New Copper Catalyzed Reactions of Organoboron and Organosilicon Compounds” on August 21. Aaron was a student in Professor Gojko Lalic’s laboratory. In October he will be joining the laboratory of Professor Vy Dong as a Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of California, Irvine. Aaron’s future research will involve the use of ruthenium as a hydroacylation catalyst, as well as applications of this methodology towards natural product synthesis.

Final Examination – Dissertation Defense

HariCongratulations to Sanjay Hari, who defended his Ph.D. work “Investigating Inactive Conformations of Protein Kinases” on August 16. Sanjay was born and raised in Cincinnati, OH. He received his B.S. from Ohio State University in 2008 and entered the Biomolecular Structure and Design (now Biophysics, Structure, and Design) program at UW the same year. Sanjay has been a student in Professor Dustin Maly’s lab since 2009, where he has been studying protein kinase conformations. Sanjay will continue working in Professor Maly’s lab for the next few months while searching for a postdoctoral position.

Final Examination – Dissertation Defense

RiedelCongratulations to Theran Riedel, who defended his Ph.D. work “Constraints on Reactivity and Components of Nocturnal Nitrogen Oxides” on August 14. Theran was a student in Professor Joel Thornton’s atmospheric chemistry lab for the past five years. In the next few months, he will be heading to North Carolina to work with Professor Jason Surratt at UNC – Chapel Hill where he will study secondary organic aerosol precursors. Theran is excited to begin research there and eat Carolina style barbeque but less excited about the heat and humidity.