Michael Enright Selected as 2015 PNNL Graduate Fellow

Enright 1Michael Enright, a first-year graduate student in the research group of Assistant Professor Brandi Cossairt, has been selected as one of three inaugural PNNL Graduate Fellows. Michael is working on synthesizing new nanomaterials that use sunlight to generate clean and renewable fuels. Currently, Michael’s research goals are to develop type II semiconductors that absorb ultraviolet and visible light from the sun to excite electrons. In type II semiconductors, the excited electrons are used to catalyze the production of hydrogen gas. Michael earned a B.A. in Chemistry at Ripon College in Wisconsin. Outside of the lab, Michael enjoys playing intramural water tube basketball and cheering on the Washington Huskies athletic teams.

Rachel Eaton Selected as 2015 PNNL Graduate Fellow

Eaton 1Rachel (Rae) Eaton, a first-year graduate student in the research group of Assistant Professor Matthew Bush, has been selected as one of three inaugural PNNL Graduate Fellows. Rae’s research focuses on using native mass spectrometry to characterize the assembly, stoichiometry, and stability of proteins and protein complexes. Rae works with the emerging structures for lossless ion manipulation (SLIM), which she uses to expand the portfolio and information content of these gas-phase experiments. These experiments reveal biologically relevant data previously inaccessible using more traditional structural biology techniques. Rae earned B.A. degrees in Chemistry and Biochemistry at Oberlin College in Ohio, focusing on bioanalytical chemistry. Though her family has lived in many places, she considers herself to be from Portland, Oregon, and accordingly likes hiking, DIY foodstuffs, and fiber arts.

Jose Araujo Selected as 2015 PNNL Graduate Fellow

AraujoJose Araujo, a first-year graduate student working in the research group of Professor Daniel Gamelin, has been selected as one of three inaugural PNNL Graduate Fellows. Jose’s academic interests are focused on nanoscience, specifically, nanocrystals and the intriguing properties they exhibit compared to their bulk analogues. The diverse set of tunable properties nanocrystals exhibit make them ideal candidates for many useful applications. Jose is interested in developing semiconductor nanocrystals which he will reversibly photodope with either holes or electrons. The envisaged photodoping studies should provide insight into nanocrystal technology. Jose earned a B.S. at the University of Southern California. Outside of the lab, Jose enjoys fishing, music, watching sports, and exploring the Seattle area.

Clean Energy Institute Funds 11 Chemistry Graduate Fellows

uwcei-logo 1The University of Washington Clean Energy Institute (CEI) recently announced recipients of its 2015 Graduate Fellowships in Clean Energy Research and 11 chemistry graduate students were chosen. Selected students receive financial support in order to pursue a research project related to the development of new materials for solar energy, energy storage, or grid integration of renewable energy. The 2015 Chemistry fellows (along with their faculty sponsors) are:

  • Charles Barrows (Daniel Gamelin)
  • Michael De Siena (Daniel Gamelin)
  • Benjamin Glassy (Brandi Cossairt)
  • Patrick Lestrange (Xiaosong Li)
  • Francis Lin (Alex K.-Y. Jen)
  • David Lingerfelt (Xiaosong Li)
  • Brigit Miller (Daniel Gamelin)
  • Timothy Pollock (Cody Schlenker)
  • Jennifer Stein (Brandi Cossairt)
  • Sarah Vorpahl (David Ginger)
  • Mark Ziffer (David Ginger)

For more information about the CEI Fellowships, please visit CEI News.

Final Examination – Dissertation Defense

BigelowCongratulations to Nicholas W. Bigelow, who defended his Ph.D. work “Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy Theory and Simulation Applied to Nanoparticle Plasmonics” on December 12, 2014. He was a student in Professor David Masiello’s laboratory for the past four years. In the next few months, he will be tying up loose ends in the Masiello lab and preparing to work in industry. Nicholas is excited to spend more time with his family and his dogs as he prepares for the next step in his career.

Final Examination – Dissertation Defense

NagaokaCongratulations to Hirokazu Nagaoka, who successfully defended his Ph.D. work “Long-lived charge carrier dynamics in polymer/quantum dot blends and organometal halide perovskites” on December 5, 2014. Hirokazu was a student in Professor David Ginger’s laboratory. In January, Hirokazu will be starting an industry research position at JNC CORPORATION in Chiba, Japan.

Final Examination – Dissertation Defense

SchimpfCongratulations to Alina Schimpf, who successfully defended her Ph.D. work entitled “Electronic and Impurity Doping in Colloidal Semiconductor Nanocrystals” on October 30, 2014. Alina was a student in Professor Daniel Gamelin’s laboratory. In April, Alina will be starting a postdoctoral research position in the lab of Mircea Dincă at MIT.

Final Examination – Dissertation Defense

BradshawCongratulations to Liam Bradshaw, who successfully defended his Ph.D. work “Luminescent Manganese in Nanocrystals” on October 28, 2014. Liam was a student in Professor Daniel Gamelin’s laboratory. He earned his B.A. from the University of Chicago in 2008. Liam is planning to stay in the Seattle area after graduation and is excited to start a career in semiconductor or photonics engineering.

Mike Larsen Selected as Winner of the 2014 Eastman Chemical Student Award in Applied Polymer Science

Larsen 1Mike Larsen, a Ph.D. candidate working with Assistant Professor AJ Boydston, has been selected as the winner of the 2014 Eastman Chemical Student Award in Applied Polymer Science. Eastman Chemical partnered with the PMSE division of the American Chemical Society to offer this award in recognition of outstanding student achievement in the field of polymers and materials research. Applicants provided a copy of a recent publication, and finalists were selected to present a seminar at the 248th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society. Based upon the submitted papers and oral presentations, Mike Larsen was selected as this year’s awardee.

Final Examination – Dissertation Defense

FowbleCongratulations to Joseph W. Fowble, who successfully defended his Ph.D. work “Localization of the Human Malaria Parasite’s Dihydrofolate Reductase-Thymidylate Synthase and Examining Its Role in Proguanil and Atovaquone Drug Synergy” on June 5, 2014. Joe was a student in Pradip Rathod’s laboratory, working on several different projects during his time there. Joe obtained a BS in Chemistry from the University of Wisconsin in 2002, developed biochemistry skills in a Medicinal Chemistry lab at The Ohio State University until 2004, and worked with a start-up to establish anticancer drug screening prior to starting his Ph.D. at UW. He is looking forward to a short vacation before embarking on new scientific problems