Final Examination – Dissertation Defense

20160609_182549Congratulations to Rob Pepin, who defended his PhD work “Gaseous Studies of Ionic Chromophores and Peptide Cation Radicals Generated from Electron Transfer” on March 4th, 2016.  He was a student in Professor Frank Turecek’s lab for the past 4 and a half years.  Following a short stint post graduation in Professor Turecek’s laboratory, Rob and his wife welcomed a son in July.  He is now looking for work as a postdoctoral scientist in the Seattle area.  He is excited to put his training to use in new applications.

Final Examination – Dissertation Defense

sdtc-headshotSophia D. T. Cherry successfully defended her Ph. D. work “Toward Catalytic Hydrogenolysis of Chlorofluorocarbons with Group 8 and 9 Complexes” on February 23, 2016. She worked in the laboratory of Professor and Chair D. Michael Heinekey while at the University of Washington. Currently, Sophia is working as a faculty member at Metropolitan State University of Denver. She is excited for this new opportunity and to continue exploring Colorado.

Final Examination – Dissertation Defense

linkedinphoto_kerry Congratulations to Kerry Garrett, who defended her thesis work, Computational Study of Linear and Nonlinear Optical Properties of Single Molecules and Clusters of Organic Electro-Optic Chromophores, on December 15, 2015. Her work in the Dalton group focused on investigating the accuracy of various density functional theory methods for predicting electronic transitions and nonlinear optical properties of specific organic electro-optic molecules of interest. She is now studying molecular dynamics simulations and electronic structure properties of actinide materials as a post-doctoral research associate at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL).

Final Examination – Dissertation Defense

Gregory I. Peterson successfully defended his PhD on June 8th 2015. The title of his thesis was, “Exploration and Application of Mechanoresponsive Polymers: Polymer Architecture, Amplified Response, and Additive Manufacturing.” Greg was a graduate student in Professor AJ Boydston’s lab, and is now headed to the University of Akron for a postdoctoral position in Professor Mathew Becker’s lab. Greg is looking forward to new opportunities and is excited to start his new research in Ohio.

Final Examination – Dissertation Defense

JBrookesCongratulations to Jennifer Brookes, who defended her Ph.D. work “Insight into the Local Solvent Environment of Biologically Relevant Iron-nitroysl Systems through Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy” on May 22, 2015. She worked in the laboratory of Professor Munira Khalil for the last six years. Jennifer was recently awarded the Arthur H. Guenther Congressional Fellowship sponsored by OSA and SPIE. This fall she will be headed to Washington, DC to serve a one-year term as a special legislative assistant on the staff of a U.S. congressional office or committee. She is looking forward to utilizing her scientific background to work on public policy issues. She is excited to spend one last summer enjoying all the things the Pacific Northwest has to offer before heading to DC.

Final Examination – Dissertation Defense

Uehling Headshot Mycah R. Uehling successfully defended his PhD on May 14th 2015. The title of his thesis was, “Gold-Catalyzed Asymmetric Synthesis of Cyclic Ethers and Copper-Catalyzed Hydrofunctionalization of Alkynes.” Mycah was a graduate student in Professor Lalic’s lab and is now headed to Boston for a postdoctoral position mainly focused on flow chemistry. Mycah would like to thank all members of the UW chemistry community for the help he received during his PhD studies and for their kindness and patience.

Final Examination – Dissertation Defense

???????????????????????????????Congratulations to Yitong (Jenny) Zhang, who defended her Ph.D. work “Taking Artemisinin to Clinical Anticancer Applications: Design, Synthesis and Characterization of pH-responsive Dimer Derivatives in Lipid Nanoparticles” on March 5, 2015. She was a student in Professor Tomikazu Sasaki’s laboratory for the past five years. In the next few weeks, she will be wrapping up in the Sasaki lab while preparing to start her career in the pharmaceutical industry. Jenny is looking forward to spending more time with her family and traveling to see the world in the meantime.

Final Examination – Dissertation Defense

HauptCongratulations to Chelsea Hess Haupt, who defended her Ph.D. work “New Methods for Investigating the Interplay of Photoluminescence Intermittency and Local Dielectric Constant” on February 24, 2015. Chelsea was a student in Professor Philip Reid’s laboratory. In March, Chelsea will be starting a position as the Associate Director of Digital Content with McGraw Hill Education in Dubuque, Iowa. Chelsea is excited to start a career in the Education Technology Industry and explore the Midwest.

Michael Enright Selected as 2015 PNNL Graduate Fellow

Enright 1Michael Enright, a first-year graduate student in the research group of Assistant Professor Brandi Cossairt, has been selected as one of three inaugural PNNL Graduate Fellows. Michael is working on synthesizing new nanomaterials that use sunlight to generate clean and renewable fuels. Currently, Michael’s research goals are to develop type II semiconductors that absorb ultraviolet and visible light from the sun to excite electrons. In type II semiconductors, the excited electrons are used to catalyze the production of hydrogen gas. Michael earned a B.A. in Chemistry at Ripon College in Wisconsin. Outside of the lab, Michael enjoys playing intramural water tube basketball and cheering on the Washington Huskies athletic teams.

Rachel Eaton Selected as 2015 PNNL Graduate Fellow

Eaton 1Rachel (Rae) Eaton, a first-year graduate student in the research group of Assistant Professor Matthew Bush, has been selected as one of three inaugural PNNL Graduate Fellows. Rae’s research focuses on using native mass spectrometry to characterize the assembly, stoichiometry, and stability of proteins and protein complexes. Rae works with the emerging structures for lossless ion manipulation (SLIM), which she uses to expand the portfolio and information content of these gas-phase experiments. These experiments reveal biologically relevant data previously inaccessible using more traditional structural biology techniques. Rae earned B.A. degrees in Chemistry and Biochemistry at Oberlin College in Ohio, focusing on bioanalytical chemistry. Though her family has lived in many places, she considers herself to be from Portland, Oregon, and accordingly likes hiking, DIY foodstuffs, and fiber arts.