Final Examination – Dissertation Defense

Congratulations to Jeremy S. Nadeau who defended his Ph.D. work  “The Impact Improvements in Retention Time Precision and Data Reduction Have on Analysis Time and Precision” on April 26. Originally from Tacoma, Washington near Seattle, he finished undergraduate work at the University of Minnesota at Morris with a degree in chemistry.  After moving back to Washington he started working at a small environmental lab and then started a graduate degree in chemistry at the University of Washington.  He is currently seeking employment.

Final Examination – Dissertation Defense

Congratulations to Joe Meredith, who defended his Ph.D. work “Iridium Complexes Relevant to Catalytic Alkane Oxidation” on April 14. He was a student in Professor Mike Heinekey’s lab for the past four years. Joe plans to conduct postdoctoral research in the UW Department of Chemistry and enjoy life in Seattle.

Final Examination – Dissertation Defense

Congratulations to Thomas Chung, who defended his Ph.D. work “Toward a Fundamental Basis for Understanding Electron-Based Methods of Peptide Dissociation” on February 22. He was a student in Professor Frank Turecek’s laboratory for the past 3.5 years. He currently works at Baylor University as a postdoctoral research associate for Dr. Bryan F. Shaw in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry. Thomas’s research at Baylor University sits at the interface of bioanalytical chemistry, medicine, and structural biology.  He endeavors in the Shaw Lab to develop new therapeutics to treat protein aggregation diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, a.k.a. Lou Gehrig’s disease), cataracts, and type 2 diabetes.  Thomas also carries out efforts in instrumentation development, especially in the area of capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS).  He uses said tools in order to elucidate the structure of proteins, e.g., ALS-variant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), at the proteomic level.  Another of his new research thrusts involves determining how the electrostatic surface potential of proteins influences their rate of amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX).

Alina Schimpf awarded National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship

Congratulations to Alina Schimpf, who has been awarded a 2011 National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship to support her Ph.D. work in our department! Alina is a second year graduate student working with Professor Daniel Gamelin on the topic of magnetic semiconductor quantum dots. Her research involves the development of methods to generate, manipulate, and read spins in semiconductor nanostructures for potential spin-electronics or spin-photonics applications. This is a highly interdisciplinary research topic, involving many things from materials synthesis to magneto-optics and time-resolved EPR spectroscopy. Previously, Alina was an undergraduate at Boise State University, where she majored in Chemistry and Mathematics, and minored in Physics.

Final Examination – Dissertation Defense

Congratulations to Lauren Ramsay, who defended her Ph.D. work “Ultrasensitive Capillary Isoelectric Focusing for the Analysis of Biological Samples” on April 1. She was a student in Professor Norm Dovichi’s laboratory. Lauren will be heading to Boulder, Colorado to work at InDevR and to reunite with the sunshine and her family.