Five students receive Washington Research Foundation Fellowships

Congratulations to Marvin Nayan, Ben Horst, Evan Boyle, Derek Nhan, and Matt Sonnett who have received Washington Research Foundation Fellowships.  Washington Research Foundation Fellowships (WRFF)  for advanced undergraduates support promising students who work on creative and sophisticated science and engineering research projects under the guidance of UW faculty. WRFFs target undergraduates who have already participated in undergraduate research for at least three quarters and who are working beyond an introductory level in a project that requires creativity and advanced knowledge.

Marvin Nayan is a senior studying Neurobiology and Biochemistry. Marvin’s project investigates the genetic factors of dendrite patterning and maintenance morphology in fruit fly sensory neurons. He is hopeful this research will contribute to our understanding of genetic mechanisms underlying the maintenance of neuronal function.

 

Evan Boyle is a senior studying Microbiology and Biochemistry. Long fascinated by the often subtle distinction between healthy and diseased conditions, he worked on genotyped multiple transgenic mouse lines and expressed recombinant enzymes in E. coli and Sf9 cells to study the role of secreted phospholipases A2 in asthma and other conditions.

 

Ben Horst is  a senior in Chemistry & Biochemistry.  Ben works in the Mayer lab studying reduction/oxidation and biomimetic inorganic chemistry, and nanoparticles. Ben’s first project  involved studying a reduction/oxidation mechanism called a Multiple-Site Concerted Proton Electron Transfer reaction. His new project combines TiO2 nanoparticles and Concerted Proton Electron Transfer to complete a non-trivial two electron, two proton transfer.

Derek Nhan is a senior majoring in Biochemistry and Neurobiology. He is currently doing research in the Becker lab and has been involved in several projects associated with the consequences of post-stroke cerebrovascular damage and his most recent project focuses on the morphologies of neuronal damage as a marker for worse clinical outcome.

 

Matthew Sonnett is a senior Biochemistry major who is currently working with Professor Mike Gelb. His research involves  making small molecule inhibitors that can be used to better understand the role of several proteins intimately involved in a number of inflammatory events.

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