66th field season underway in world’s longest-running effort to monitor salmon

66th field season underway in world’s longest-running effort to monitor salmon

By Sandra Hines
via UW News
When the University of Washington launched its Alaska Salmon Program 66 years ago, researchers were tasked with determining why Alaska’s sockeye salmon catches had declined over two decades from 22 million fish per year to 10 million.

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New book explores Noah’s Flood; says Bible and science can get along

New book explores Noah’s Flood; says Bible and science can get along

By Vince Stricherz
via UW News
David Montgomery is a geomorphologist, a geologist who studies changes to topography over time and how geological processes shape landscapes.

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Robert J. Naiman earns award for insights into freshwater ecosystems

Robert J. Naiman earns award for insights into freshwater ecosystems

By Sandra Hines
via UW Today
Robert J. Naiman, a University of Washington professor known internationally for his work on freshwater ecology and ways to balance environmental and societal considerations, has received the highest award given by the Ecological Society of America, the world’s largest society of professional ecologists.

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Nuclear and coal-fired electrical plants vulnerable to climate change

Nuclear and coal-fired electrical plants vulnerable to climate change

By Hannah Hickey
via UW News
Warmer water and reduced river flows in the United States and Europe in recent years have led to reduced production, or temporary shutdown, of several thermoelectric power plants.

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Fossil raindrop impressions imply greenhouse gases loaded early atmosphere

Fossil raindrop impressions imply greenhouse gases loaded early atmosphere

By Vince Stricherz
via UW News
In ancient Earth history, the sun burned as much as 30 percent dimmer than it does now.

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Russian river water unexpected culprit behind Arctic freshening

Russian river water unexpected culprit behind Arctic freshening

By Sandra Hines
via UW Today
A hemispherewide phenomenon – and not just regional forces – has caused record-breaking amounts of freshwater to accumulate in the Arctics Beaufort Sea.

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Nitrogen from humans pollutes remote lakes for more than a century

Nitrogen from humans pollutes remote lakes for more than a century

By Sandra Hines
via UW Today
Nitrogen derived from human activities has polluted lakes throughout the Northern Hemisphere for more than a century and the fingerprint of these changes is evident even in remote lakes located thousands of miles from the nearest city, industrial area or farm.

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Julian Olden and graduate student Thomas Pool weigh invasive carp from an Arizona stream.

Beyond ecological insubordination: Speaker urges us to rethink invasive species

By Sandra Hines
via UW Today
Non-native species are viewed widely as being a paramount threat to biodiversity and ecosystem goods and services that society relies upon.

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NASA Freshwater ponds appear atop the Arctic ice cap during the summer melt in this image taken on July 12. The NASA-funded Impacts of Climate on Ecosystems and Chemistry of the Arctic Pacific Environment project has been examining the ponds and the ice around them this summer. Credit: NASA

Model shows polar ice caps can recover from warmer climate-induced melting

by Vince Stricherz
via UW Today
A growing body of recent research indicates that, in Earths warming climate, there is no “tipping point,” or threshold warm temperature, beyond which polar sea ice cannot recover if temperatures come back down.

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Students water-testing tool wins $40,000, launches nonprofit

Students water-testing tool wins $40,000, launches nonprofit

By Hannah Hickey
via UW News
University of Washington engineering students have won an international contest for their design to monitor water disinfection using the suns rays.

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