Piranha kin wielded dental weaponry even T. rex would have admired

Piranha kin wielded dental weaponry even T. rex would have admired

By Sandra Hines
via UW News and Information
Taking into consideration its size, an ancient relative of piranhas weighing about 20 pounds delivered a bite with a force more fierce than prehistoric whale-eating sharks, the four-ton ocean-dwelling Dunkleosteus terrelli and – even – Tyrannosaurus rex.

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Over several years, melt water flowing off the Greenland ice sheet carved this 60-foot deep canyon (note people standing at the right for scale). Source: Ian Joughin, Univ. of Washington

International study provides more solid measure of shrinking in polar ice sheets

By Hannah Hickey
via News and Information
The planet’s two largest ice sheets have been losing ice faster during the past decade, causing widespread confusion and concern.

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Average yearly pesticide application from 1999-2004 – expressed as kilograms per square kilometer – and a growing number of wastewater treatment plants in the Columbia basin are reasons to learn more about such chemical inputs and food webs. Source: Northwest Power and Conservation Council

Hungry salmon a problem for restoration efforts

By Sandra Hines
via News and Information
Food webs needed by young salmon in the Columbia River basin are likely compromised in places, something that should be considered when prioritizing expensive restoration activities aimed at rebuilding endangered runs.

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Leh, an Indian town in a high desert valley in the Himalaya mountains, as it appeared just a few days before the flood. Photo: Jennifer Spatz, Global Family Travels

Roots of deadly 2010 India flood identified; findings could improve warnings

By Nancy Gohring
via UW News
On the night of Aug. 5, 2010, as residents slept, water began rushing through Leh, an Indian town in a high desert valley in the Himalayas.

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New book explores Noah’s Flood; says Bible and science can get along

New book explores Noah’s Flood; says Bible and science can get along

By Vince Stricherz
via UW News
David Montgomery is a geomorphologist, a geologist who studies changes to topography over time and how geological processes shape landscapes.

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Robert J. Naiman earns award for insights into freshwater ecosystems

Robert J. Naiman earns award for insights into freshwater ecosystems

By Sandra Hines
via UW Today
Robert J. Naiman, a University of Washington professor known internationally for his work on freshwater ecology and ways to balance environmental and societal considerations, has received the highest award given by the Ecological Society of America, the world’s largest society of professional ecologists.

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Students water-testing tool wins $40,000, launches nonprofit

Students water-testing tool wins $40,000, launches nonprofit

By Hannah Hickey
via UW News
University of Washington engineering students have won an international contest for their design to monitor water disinfection using the suns rays.

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