Figure 1.  Photographs of control (forested) and gap (open) study sites on 8 May 2011.

Forest Management to Maximize Snow Retention under Climate Change

OVERVIEW
The mountain watersheds of the Pacific Northwest are expected to experience a decrease in snowpack depth and earlier snowmelt in coming decades. 

Read Article →
The Influence of Lake and Stream Biogeochemistry on Ecosystem Properties

The Influence of Lake and Stream Biogeochemistry on Ecosystem Properties

OVERVIEW
Nutrient biogeochemistry affects a myriad of ecosystem processes from primary producer biomass and community composition, to habitat quality, to upper trophic level production.

Read Article →
Figure 1. Amphibians of the Sonoran Desert span an incredible spectrum of behavioral and life history adaptations to life in an arid environment. Many native anurans (frogs, toads, and spadefoots) are common in the arroyos, cienegas, and canyons of the landscape. Our study occurs primarily during the (A) Monsoon season in the Huachuca Mountains and surrounding ranges, and focuses on (B) Mexican Spadefoot (Spea multiplicata), (C) Red-spotted Toad (Anaxyrus punctatus) and (D) Canyon Treefrog  (Hyla arenicolor). Photo credits: Meryl Mims.

Hydroecology of Intermittent and Ephemeral Streams: Will landscape connectivity sustain aquatic organisms in a changing climate?

OVERVIEW
Dryland streams play a vital role in shaping the hydrological, biogeochemical, and ecological structure and function of arid and semi-arid ecosystems in the American Southwest and elsewhere.

Read Article →
Figure 2. Projected loss of thermal habitat in the John Day River network by 2070–2099 under the A1B greenhouse gas emissions scenario by general circulation model (ECHAM5/MPI-O, CNRM-CM3,
and UKMO-HadCM3) and species. Length of habitat loss (top number set) is reported in kilometers and volume of habitat loss (bottom number set) is in millions of cubic meters. From: Ruesch et al. (2012).

Forecasting the interactive effects of climate change, riparian land use and invasive species on Pacific salmon

OVERVIEW
Climate change, increasing agricultural and urban land-use, and invasive species threaten the functioning of freshwater ecosystems in the Pacific Northwest.

Read Article →
Figure 1:  Puget Sound basin land cover change 1880 and 2002.  1880 information from University of Washington Library map collection; 2002 is from classified LandSat imagery.

Puget Sound Past, Present, and Future: 150 years of hydrologic change

OVERVIEW
The Puget Sound basin has changed remarkably since Anglo settlement in the mid-1800s. The primary agents of change have been urbanization, primarily in the lowlands, forest harvest (lowlands and uplands), and a warming climate. 

Read Article →
Top