Freshwater Experts

Below is a list of faculty experts in fresh water. If you would like to be added to this list, or if you have a project to add, email freshwtr@uw.edu.

  • Marina Alberti

    Urban Design and Planning

    Prof. Alberti’s research interests are in the impacts of alternative urban development patterns on ecosystem dynamics. She is currently directing an NSF-funded research project aimed at studying the impact of urban development patterns on ecosystem dynamics in the Puget Sound region. She is also developing a simulation model that integrates urban development and ecological dynamics to predict the impact of urban growth in this region. Her research also focuses on measures of urban environmental performance that can be used to monitor progress and inform policy making.

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  • James Anderson

    Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, CSSS, and CSDE

    Prof. Anderson develops models of ecological and biological processes from a mechanistic perspective. Currently, the work divides into three general but overlapping areas: (1) migration of organisms, (2) decision processes, and (3) mortality processes. Prof. Anderson has a wide ranging interest in understanding how things work and then expressing them mathematically.

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  • Sandra O. Archibald

    Public Affairs

    Dean Sandra O. Archibald leads the the Evans School of Public Affairs. Her research interests concern a wide area focusing on the intersection of economics, institutions, and public policy. She has  interest in water resources, economics for policy analysis, environmental and natural resource policy, and advanced policy analysis.

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  • E. Virginia Armbrust

    Oceanography

    Phytoplankton is the main focus of research for Prof. Armbrust. These organisms are responsible for about 40% of the total amount of photosynthesis that occurs on our planet. They play a critical role in the global carbon cycle and ultimately in global climate. Because much of the organic carbon generated by phytoplankton is used by bacteria, her lab also studies bacterial/phytoplankton interactions.

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  • Joel Baker

    University of Washington – Tacoma, Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences

    Prof. Baker’s research interests center around the transport of organic contaminants in the environment, specifically atmospheric transport and deposition, aerosol chemistry, the dynamics of contaminant transport in estuaries, and modeling the exposure and transfer of bioaccumulative chemicals in aquatic food webs.

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  • John A. Baross

    Oceanography

    Prof. Baross studies thermophilic microorganisms from volcanic environments, the origin and evolution of life and life on other planets and moons, and microbial ecology of the Columbia River estuary.

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  • David A. Beauchamp

    Aquatic and Fishery Sciences

    Prof. Beauchamp’s research program focuses on predator-prey interactions, bioenergetics modeling, behavioral ecology, distribution, growth, population dynamics, and food web dynamics, primarily in large lakes, estuarine, and marine systems. His lab addresses basic questions in aquatic ecology and critical issues relating to management and conservation of sensitive species, harvestable species, hatchery-wild species interactions, and ecosystem function in response to natural or human-induced environmental change.

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  • Susan Bolton

    Environmental Science and Resource Management

    Prof. Bolton’s research interests include surface water hydrology, watershed management, and water quality.

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  • Michael T. Brett

    Environmental Engineering

    Prof. Brett’s research is in biological limnology, in particular, nutrient discharges and eutrophication in lakes, streams and estuaries. Mike also does research on the production and bioaccumulation of omega-3 fatty acids in aquatic food webs, coupling between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, and zooplankton ecology.

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  • Joseph H. Cook

    Public Affairs

    Prof. Cook’s research uses tools from economics to inform environmental and health policy, often in economically-developing countries. His focus is primarily on water and sanitation policy, water resources management, stated preference methods, and vaccine policy.

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  • Alan Devol

    Oceanography

    Prof. Devol’s research focuses on nitrogen and sulfur biogeochemistry in the water column and sediments, benthic fluxes, regional studies in the Arctic, Arabian Sea and Eastern Tropical North Pacific and development of a profiling biogeochemical mooring in Puget Sound.

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  • Walton W. Dickhoff

    Aquatic and Fishery Sciences

    Research in Prof. Dickhoff’s laboratory is aimed at understanding endocrine control of physiological processes in fish, and applying endocrinology to aquaculture and fisheries enhancement. Specific projects focus on growth and development. A broad range of experimental approaches to the problems are involved, from hormonal dietary treatment of hundreds of thousands of fish to studies of the molecular mechanisms of hormonal control of gene expression and biochemical purification of hormones.

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  • Timothy E. Essington

    Aquatic and Fishery Sciences

    Prof. Essington’s research focuses on food web interactions involving fish in marine, estuarine, and freshwater habitats. A primary consideration for his work is the role of fisheries and other anthropogenic effects as a major structuring process. His lab therefore also looks at links between fishery governance (e.g. rights-based fishing) and ecological conditions, and attempts to understand the potential conflicts between fisheries targeting species that occupy distinct positions in food webs.

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  • Evan P. Gallagher

    Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences

    Dr. Gallagher maintains an active research program focused in the area of the molecular and biochemical basis for susceptibility of environmental chemical toxicity. His lab’s work encompasses studies in Pacific salmon and zebrafish, as well as in fish and human cell models. Accordingly, the lab addresses toxicological issues that often involve ecological and human health.

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  • Alan F. Hamlet

    Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Prof. Hamlet’s research over the last 10 years has focused on the impacts of climate variability and change on rivers and water resources systems in the western U.S., with a particular emphasis on the Columbia River basin in the Pacific Northwest.

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  • Barbara M. Hickey

    Oceanography

    Prof. Hickey studies: dynamics of coastal oceanography and bio-physical interactions such as hypoxia and harmful algal blooms; estuarine circulation, estuary-ocean interactions, eastern boundary current systems; circulation in submarine canyons; river plumes; flow over sills; and semienclosed basin circulation.

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  • Erkan Istanbulluoglu

    Oceanography

    Prof. Istanbulluoglu’s research is highly interdisciplinary and aims to understand the role of climate on ecohydrological and geomorphological response of landscapes, sediment transport, and water balance of large basins. He uses empirical field observations, satellite-derived data, and numerical models to examine the response of the landscape system to natural and anthropogenic disturbances.

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  • Marina G. Kalyuzhnaya

    Microbiology

    Prof. Kalyuzhnaya explores single carbon (C1) metabolism as a model example for core cellular functions. Currently, she is focusing on one of the most challenging aspects in microbiology: how to gain a better understanding of the microbial metabolic network and use this knowledge to develop new green technologies. Her work often includes fresh water biota.

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  • Gregory Korshin

    Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Prof. Korshin’s research interests include corrosion and metal release in drinking water, environmental electrochemistry, advanced oxidation processes, development of new approaches to quantify and model the degradation of pharmaceuticals and other trace-level organic contaminants in wastewater, characterization of natural organic matter and its reactions with halogens, on-line methods to monitor drinking water quality and environmental chemistry of radionuclides.

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  • Joshua J. Lawler

    Environmental and Forest Sciences

    Prof. Lawler’s recent research projects include: projecting climate-induced shifts in species distributions, investigating the effects of climate change on protected lands, modeling population dynamics in changing landscapes, developing tools for conservation planning, and assessing climate-change vulnerabilities.

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  • Dennis P. Lettenmaier

    Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Prof. Lettenmaier’s early work was in the design of stream quality monitoring networks. Later he focused on stochastic hydrology which is essentially a representation of random variability in streamflow sequences. His research focuses on surface water hydrology and using remote sensing as a tool to understand hydrologic problems.

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  • Mary E. Lidstrom

    Chemical Engineering

    Dr. Lidstrom’s laboratory is focused on molecular and metabolic manipulations of methylotrophic bacteria, which are capable of growth on methane, methanol, and methylated amines. The long-term goal of this research is to develop environmentally sound and economically viable alternatives to current chemical production and cleanup strategies.

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  • Jessica Lundquist

    Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Prof. Lundquist’s group’s research goals are to understand spatial patterns of snow accumulation, snowmelt, and streamflow in complex terrain, particularly as they relate to changes in weather and climate. Resource managers have little control over weather and climate, but they can make spatial decisions of which areas to protect, to restore, or to depend on for water supplies, and so we believe that understanding spatial relationships can have a positive impact on societal choices.

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  • John Scott Meschke

    Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, and Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Prof. Meschke is an environmental and occupational health microbiologist, specializing in the fate, transport, detection, and control of pathogens in environmental media (Air, Water, Food, and Surfaces). Meschke is a member of several professional organizations including: the American Society for Microbiology, the International Water Association, the American Water Works Association, the International Association for Food Protection, and the International Society of Exposure Science.

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  • David R. Montgomery

    Earth and Space Sciences

    Prof. Montgomery studies the evolution of topography and the influence of geomorphological processes on ecological systems and human societies. His published work includes studies of the evolution and near-extirpation of salmon, fluvial and hillslope processes in mountain drainage basins, the evolution of mountain ranges (Cascades, Andes, and Himalaya), and the analysis of digital topography. Current research includes field projects in eastern Tibet and the Pacific Northwest of North America.

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  • Robert J. Naiman

    Aquatic and Fishery Sciences

    Prof. Naiman’s research interests focus on the structure and dynamics of streams and rivers, riparian vegetation, and the role of large animals in influencing system dynamics. My current interests revolve around interactions between marine-derived nutrients and riparian vegetation, as well as the environmental consequences of changing water regimes.

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  • Rebecca B. Neumann

    Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Prof. Neumann’s research seeks to understand how land-surface modifications and management decisions affect human and environmental health by altering the fluxes of water, nutrients, carbon, and contaminants in underlying soils. Her work recognizes that soils are the critical interface between the atmosphere, land surface and subsurface; and that soil fluxes often control the quality of food and water resources.

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  • Andrea S. Ogston

    Oceanography

    Prof. Ogston studies interaction between geological and physical oceanography of the coastal ocean; dispersal of sediment from river to deep sea, emphasizing high-concentration, gravity-driven flows; sediment transport processes in marine environments from surf zone to continental slope; and instrument development.

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  • Julian Olden

    Aquatic and Fishery Sciences

    Prof. Olden’s research group explores the ecology and conservation of freshwater ecosystems. Topics of particular interest include the study of invasive species, ecohydrology and the impacts of hydrologic alteration by human activities, linking food webs and nutrient fluxes to landscape change, global conservation biogeography, traits-based approaches to community ecology, and climate change and conservation strategies for the future. Research is conducted in western waters of North America using field collection, small- and large-scale experiments and data synthesis and modeling.

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  • Paul Quay

    Oceanography

    Prof. Quay researches applications of stable and radioisotope measurements to bio geochemical cycles; carbon and oxygen cycling in lakes, rivers and oceans; atmospheric trace gas cycles; and large-scale ocean circulation rates using anthropogenic tracers.

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  • Thomas Quinn

    Aquatic and Fishery Sciences

    Prof. Quinn’s group works on the behavior, ecology, evolution, and conservation of fishes. Most of our work is conducted on salmon, trout and char, investigating such topics as migratory behavior and homing, habitat requirements, factors affecting reproductive success, evolution of populations, straying and population expansion, and trophic ecology. Our research blends a variety of field techniques including tagging, telemetry, direct observations, and a variety of sampling techniques with laboratory experiments and analysis of long-term datasets.

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  • Jeffery E. Richey

    Oceanography

    Prof. Richey studies drainage basin and riverine biogeochemistry, hydrological cycles, sediment transport, and gas fluxes; from field, modeling and remote sensing; with a focus on large drainage basins and land ocean interaction in the coastal zone. He works to develop integrated system models, ultimately expressed as “dynamic information frameworks (DIF),” as the means to converge and disseminate complex information.

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  • Charles Simenstad

    Aquatic and Fishery Sciences

    Prof. Simenstad studies shallow-water community and food web structure, and restoration ecology, of estuarine and coastal marine ecosystems along the Pacific Northwest coast, from San Francisco Bay, the Oregon and Washington coasts, Puget Sound, and Alaska. Ecosystems that have especially attracted his interests include: coastal marshes, mudflats and eelgrass of Pacific Northwest estuaries; nearshore, kelp-dominated shores of the Aleutian Islands, Alaska; and San Francisco Bay-Delta. Much of Prof. Simenstad’s recent research is involved in the Columbia River estuary.

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  • Daniel Schindler

    Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, and Biology

    Prof. Schindler’s current research activities are focused generally on understanding the causes and consequences of dynamics in aquatic ecosystems. Of particular interest are (1) the effects of changing climate on trophic interactions and ecosystem services provided by aquatic ecosystems, (2) fisheries as large-scale drivers of ecosystem organization, (3) importance of anadromous fishes for linking marine ecosystems to coastal aquatic and riparian systems, and (4) the importance of aquatic-terrestrial coupling in the organization of aquatic ecosystems.

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  • Kristiina Vogt

    Environmental Science and Resource Management

    Prof. Vogt’s research interests include ecosystem management, linking social and natural science, reserves, and conservation.

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