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Who Teaches QSci Courses?

Courses offered through the Center for Quantitative Science are largely taught by faculty from the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences and the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. One characteristic that the professors and teaching assistants in CQS all have in common is that their research involves the application of quantitative methods to biological problems.  Therefore, in addition to being biologically knowledgeable they also have degrees in biostatistics, biophysics, mathematics, the management of resources, or other professionally related areas.  One consequence of their experience and training is that they bring a realistic sense of the methods that are important for students to know and they have the ability to extract from their years of experience relevant problems that are meaningful to large numbers of students in the class.

CQS Faculty

Dr. Trevor Branch is an Assistant Professor at the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, where he uses computer models to capture the biology and fishing behaviour of marine fisheries. He also works on fishing effects on food webs, the impacts of fishing rights on management, and the modelling of large whale populations. He currently teaches QSCI 458 "Modeling and estimation in conservation and resource management" which teaches students how to implement likelihood-based models to solve real-life terrestrial and marine conservation problems.

Dr. Tim Essington is a Professor in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. His research interest is in quantitative ecology, in general, and in the analysis of marine food webs in particular. Dr. Essington teaches Q Sci 454. essing@u.washington.edu - http://fish.washington.edu/people/essington/courses.html

Dr. Vincent Gallucci is the Director of the Center for Quantitative Science, a Professor in the School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences, Adjunct Professor in the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, and a past Wakefield Professor of Ocean and Fishery Sciences. He is also active in the interdisciplinary graduate program in Quantitative Ecology and Resource Management. His research is in apex predators in north Pacific and tropical marine waters. His specialty is in population dynamics and management of sharks and sea lions. Professor Gallucci teaches in the Q Sci calculus and differential equations sequences—Q Sci 291, 292, and 293 and in the statistics sequence—Q Sci 381, 482, and 480.  vgallucc@u.washington.edu - http://fish.washington.edu/people/gallucci

Dr. Beth Gardner is an Assistant Professor at the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences. She is interested in developing models and methods to estimate demographic rates, distributional patterns, and habitat relationships for fish and wildlife species. Most of this work is driven by an underlying interest in helping to improve decision making for conservation and management.

Dr. Ray Hilborn is the Richard C. and Lois M. Worthington Professor of Fisheries Management in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. He specializes in natural resource management and conservation. Major areas of current and past research include Bayesian analysis of decision making in natural resources, adaptive management of renewable resources, the dynamics of the Serengeti ecosystem in east Africa, the role of hatcheries in management of Pacific salmon as well as many others. Dr. Hilborn is connected to the Center through Q Sci 458/Fish 458. rayh@u.washington.edu - http://fish.washington.edu/people/rayh

Dr. Gordon Holtgrieve is an ecologist interested in understanding how terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems function and are connected. His work takes a whole-ecosystem perspective to consider how the physical, chemical, and biological properties of ecosystems interact to support the resources that society depends on. Gordon’s field research crosses diverse environments, from remote western North America to the southeast Asia as part of the Mekong Basin Research Group. His techniques range from site-based analysis of field data to global-scale mathematical and statistical modeling. Gordon seeks to inform conservation and resource management through research, which is rooted in the belief that effective policies for sustainability are based on sound science. gholt@uw.edu [faculty website]

Dr. Jay Johnson is a Professor Emeritus in the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences. He is interested in mathematical models that capture the essential performance behavior of wood and paper products. Dr. Johnson teaches Q Sci 291 and 292. jjohnson@u.washington.edu - http://www.sefs.washington.edu/SFRPublic/People/FacultyProfile.aspx?PID=14

Dr. André Punt is the Director of the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. His main research interests are marine population dynamics, stock assessment methods, risk analysis, and harvesting theory. His current research focuses on the performance of stock assessment methods, application of Bayesian approaches in fisheries assessment and decision analysis, and management strategies for fish and marine mammal populations. Dr. Punt teaches Q Sci 381. aepunt@u.washington.edu - http://fish.washington.edu/people/punt

Dr. John Skalski is a Professor of biological statistics in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences with an adjunct appointment in the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences. He is also active in the interdisciplinary graduate program in Quantitative Ecology and Resource Management. His areas of expertise are design and analysis of mark-recapture studies and effects assessment on mobile species. Dr. Skalski teaches Q Sci 480 and 483. jrs@cbr.washington.edu - http://fish.washington.edu/people/skalski

Dr. Patrick Tobin is an ecologist interested in a broad range of aspects related to forest health, including entomology — the scientific study of insects — invasion ecology, and population ecology. He spent more than 11 years with the U.S. Forest Service Northern Research Station in Morgantown, West Virginia before coming to the UW. Patrick earned a bachelor’s in environmental health sciences from the University of Georgia, a master’s in entomology and Ph.D. in entomology from Penn State. pctobin@uw.edu [faculty website]