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Directory >> Susan Graham, MD, MPH, PhD

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Susan Graham, MD, MPH, PhD

  • Assistant Professor, Division of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine
  • Assistant Professor, Department of Global Health
    Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology
  • University of Washington

Dr. Susan M. Graham is a member of the Kenya Research Group at the University of Washington. She began working with the UoN/UW Mombasa Field Site in August 2003 as an Infectious Diseases Fellow at the University of Washington. She began the antiretroviral therapy program offered at the clinic and worked as a research clinician until 2006 on a study of Antiretroviral Therapy and HIV-1 Infectivity in Women with Dr. Scott McClelland. When she completed her fellowship, she became an Acting Instructor at the University of Washington, and is currently an Assistant Professor. Dr. Graham recently led and completed two studies of HIV-1 infectivity in Kenya, including Genital HIV-1 Shedding among Women Starting Second-Line Antiretroviral Therapy and Initiating Studies of Genitourinary HIV-1 Shedding in Kenyan Men. She also led and completed a CFAR New Investigator Award study titled, The Role of Angiopoietins 1 and 2 in HIV-1 Disease Progression. In addition, she has developed a new research cohort of HIV-1-seropositive adults in Kilifi and Mtwapa, north of Mombasa, in collaboration with Dr. Eduard Sanders of the Kenya Medical Research Institute. With Dr. Sanders, she is developing a program of research on HIV prevention and care for Kenya men who have sex with men. She has a pending grant titled, "Provider and Peer Support Intervention to Improve ART Adherence among Kenyan Men" for work at this site.

Dr. Graham holds a medical degree from McGill University in Montreal, Canada, a master's degree in public health from Boston University in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, and a PhD in clinical epidemiology from the University of Toronto in Toronto, Canada. She holds Visiting Scientist appointments at the University of Nairobi and the Kenya Medical Research Institute. She directs the University of Washington School of Medicine's Global Health Pathway and is the Track Director for the University of Washington's concurrent MD-MPH program in Global Health. In addition, she co-leads the annual "Principles of STD/HIV Research" course, with co-director Rachel Winer.


Selected Publications


Graham SM, Mugo P, Gichuru E, et al. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy and clinical outcomes among young adults reporting high-risk sexual behavior, including men who have sex with men, in Coastal Kenya. AIDS Behav. 2013; 17(4): 1255-65.
PubMed Abstract


Sanders EJ, Okuku HS, Smith AD, Mwangome M, Wahome E, Fegan G, Peshu N, van der Elst EM, Price MA, McClelland RS, Graham SM. High HIV-1 incidence, correlates of HIV-1 acquisition, and high viral loads following seroconversion among MSM. AIDS. 2013; 27(3): 437-46.
doi: 10.1097/QAD.0b013e32835b0f81.
PMID:
23079811
PubMed Abstract


Graham SM, Holte SE, Dragavon JA, et al. HIV-1 RNA may decline more slowly in semen than in blood following initiation of efavirenz-based antiretroviral therapy. PLoS One. 2012; 7(8): e43086. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0043086.
PMID:
22912795
PLoS ONE Abstract


Graham SM, Jalalian-Lechak Z, Shafi J, et al. Antiretroviral treatment interruptions predict female genital shedding of genotypically resistant HIV-1 RNA. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2012; 60(5): 511-8.
doi: 10.1097/QAI.0b013e31825bd703.
PMID: 22592588
PubMed Abstract


Graham SM, Masese L, Gitau R, et al. Genital ulceration does not increase HIV-1 shedding in cervical or vaginal secretions of women taking antiretroviral therapy. Sex Transm Infect. 2011; 87(2): 114-7.
PMID:
20980464
PubMed Abstract


Graham SM, Masese L, Gitau R, et al. Antiretroviral adherence and development of drug resistance are the strongest predictors of genital HIV-1 shedding among women initiating treatment: a prospective cohort study. J Infect Dis. 2010; 202(10): 1538-42.
PMID:
20923373
PubMed Abstract

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