Announcements

Several upcoming events this week

Posted by admin on February 23, 2015
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Hello lovely folks! This week of February 22-28, 2015, we have a few exciting events in store.

Wednesday, February 25

Deaf and/or Hard of Hearing Meetup (Facebook event)

WHEN: Wednesday, February 25 @ 6:30-7:30pm

WHERE: D Center (Mary Gates Hall 024), University of Washington

Join us in a peer-led space for deaf and hard of hearing people to come together, share experiences and solidarity, and support each other in a casual, discussion-based setting.

This group is a safe, confidential, and accessible space for students who feel disconnected from the hearing world and/or Deaf community. For accessibility, conversations will be transcribed/captioned in real time. If you have any additional access needs, see below. Snacks will be provided and non-UW students are welcome! Please RSVP at dccomm@uw.edu.

Thursday, February 26

Disability Incarcerated: A Lecture with Liat Ben-Moshe (Facebook event)

WHEN: Thursday, February 26, 6:30-8pm

WHERE: HUB 250, University of Washington

How can a disability lens help in understanding the rise of the U.S. prison nation and recent and historic acts of police brutality? What happened when people demanded to close down institutions for people who are labeled intellectually or psychiatrically disabled? What can it teach us about present day prisons and their abolition? This talk builds on the analysis of activists and scholars who fought and are fighting for a world with no institutionalization, imprisonment and State policing.

Friday, February 27

Meet & Greet with Jeff Brune and Liat Ben-Moshe (Facebook event)

WHEN: Friday, February 27, 2015, 11:00am – 12:30pm

WHERE: D Center (Mary Gates Hall 024), University of Washington

Come meet & greet Jeff Brune, Associate Professor of History at Gallaudet University, and Liat Ben-Moshe, Assistant Professor of Disability Studies at the University of Toledo. Refreshments will be provided!

Disability Justice Workshop: Building Coalitions for Collective Liberation (Facebook event)

WHEN: Friday, February 27, 2015, 7:00pm – 8:30pm

WHERE: Alder Hall 107, University of Washington

*Please be scent free! More accessibility info below*

Come join fellow local activists in a community discussion about ways for justice movements to build coalitions with an emphasis on Disability Justice and liberation.

Prisons don’t make us safer. Psychiatric hospitals don’t make us safer. The police don’t make us safer. These institutions imprison and commit acts of horrific violence against disabled, black, brown, queer, trans, disabled, mentally ill, and poor communities and communities of color, especially those most marginalized at the intersections of related oppressions. Let’s bring our movements together so we can build coalitions that can dismantle these institutions from all angles. Using Disability Justice as our uniting framework, we’ll break out into discussion groups led by different organizations to workshop ways to better connect our movements. Finally, we’ll come back together and share our new ideas and strategies for coalitions and collective liberation.

Break-out discussion leaders:

  • Women of Color for Systemic Change
  • Eaonhawinon Patricia Allen
  • Outside Agitators 206
  • Liat Ben Moshe
  • Outlaws at UW
  • ET Russian and Amber MV

We’re so thrilled to be able to offer these events. We hope y’all can make it!

Out & About: First Meeting February 11th @ 2:30

Posted by admin on February 04, 2015
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Passing along this opportunity from the Alliance of People of disAbilities. For more information, please contact Mariah at mariah@disabilitypride.org. You may also view the following flyer for more details: Out and About Group Flyer.

*

Hello from the Alliance!

Reminder! The Alliance has a new youth social group called “Out & About.” Out & About is a group for youth and young adults with disabilities looking to meet and socialize with other youth and who are interested in getting out into the community and exploring Seattle and King County.

Our first group meeting will be at our Seattle office, in the Central district, on Wednesday, February 11th from 2:30-4:00. Our address is below. It is an open meeting – any youth or young adult with a disability up to age 24 can attend. We will introduce the group and talk about plans for the future. If you know of anyone that would be interested please share this information. We would love to see a great group of youth with disabilities be a part of this group! I have attached a flyer with information about the group and my contact information.

Mariah Hutchinson, MAAT, LMHCA

Youth Transition Specialist

Alliance of People of disAbilities

Calling Us Crazy: Psychiatric Survivors Stories on Institutionalization

Posted by admin on December 23, 2014
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Call For Zine Submissions!

Title: Calling Us Crazy: Psychiatric Survivors Stories on Institutionalization

Potential Topics: Personal experiences with forced and coerced institutionalization (hospitalization in psychiatric facilities, 72 hour holds, Less Restrictive Orders, placement in group homes, residential facilities, forced treatment, forced medication, or other institutional setting where our autonomy is take away), and alternatives to institutionalization.

Medium: Poetry, prose, personal stories, paintings, drawings, other artwork, etc.

Who We Are: This zine is open to anyone who has experienced institutionalization. We are psychiatric survivors and students at University of Washington working for disability justice in our school and greater communities.

Why: We are creating this zine because there is not enough information by and for people who society and psychiatry decides is in “need” of being forcibly institutionalized. We want to create a resource for people who are mentally ill, mad, crazy, or whatever identity fits best, to find out what our rights are, recourse if our rights are violated, and to share experiences of forced institutionalization.

Distribution: We are planning to have both a paper copy of this zine which will be distributed at a workshop we are also planning about forced institutionalization, as well as an online copy.

Deadline: February 1st, 2015.

Email: dcenter@uw.edu

Please please signal boost this!

The Collective Narrative Project: Invisible Disabilities

Posted by admin on November 25, 2013
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The Collective Narrative Project: Invisible Disabilities

Tell your story. Submit your work for our upcoming CNP ‘Zine

Deadline: January 6, 2014
Estimated date of completion: January 13, 2014
Send to: collectivenarrativeproject@gmail.com
Hard copies to: D Center, Mary Gates Hall, Rm 024. Please drop off during hours of operation: http://depts.washington.edu/dcenter/wordpress/?page_id=311

*When submitting please include how you wish to be identified or whether you would like to remain anonymous.

Who we are

The Collective Narrative Project is a movement organized by a coalition of Masters of Social Work students at the University of Washington who are committed to raising awareness around social justice issues. We are taking action to disrupt and challenge dominant social narratives by empowering the voices of oppressed and marginalized groups through creative, collective action in the form of a ‘zine. Our vision is to resist the reiteration of “single stories” that represent center on normative social groups while rendering other groups and identities invisible. We want to introduce all stories to compose a new and open narrative of ourselves, groups, communities, and society.

What is a ‘zine (/ˈziːn/)?

A ‘zine is a small-scale circulation of self-published works of original or gathered texts, artwork, and images usually reproduced by photocopier. Historically, and with the invention of the printing press, dissidents and marginalized citizens have published their own opinions in the form of leaflets and pamphlets. We would like to continue this tradition of grass-roots social activism through self-published, freely distributed literature.

The CNP ‘Zine on Invisible Disabilities

With our first, upcoming issue we are creating a publication that focuses on invisible or unseen disabilities, offering multiple views and voices on this topic. We are also interested in the ways in which other identities intersect with disability. Participation by those who do not identify as disabled is also encouraged. ‘Zine submissions can take the form of visual arts, essays, fiction, comics etc. Anything that can be scanned or photographed and sent as an email attachment is valid. Hard copies can be submitted to the D Center (location).
Help us showcase the stories of individuals and groups from a myriad of identities, intersections, backgrounds, and experiences by being part of this inclusive narrative of our diverse community.

Deadline: January 6, 2014
Estimated date of completion: January 13, 2014
Send to: collectivenarrativeproject@gmail.com
Hard copies to: D Center, Mary Gates Hall, Rm 024. Please drop off during hours of operation: http://depts.washington.edu/dcenter/wordpress/?page_id=311

Krip-Hop Nation/5th Battalion Presents Police Brutality Profiling, Krip Kultural Activism Through Hip-Hop/Spoken Word

Posted by admin on May 06, 2013
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Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/223607337763935/?fref=ts

The ASUW Student Disability Commission and the D Center at the University of Washington present “Krip-Hop Nation/5th Battalion Presents Police Brutality Profiling, Krip Kultural Activism Through Hip-Hop/Spoken Word”

Leroy F. Moore Founder of Krip-Hop Nation & DJ Quad, Founder of 5th Battalion will not only perform their political, personal and powerful songs/poems but will also talk about their CD on police Brutality Profiling Mixtape, that came out last year, what is Krip-Hop Nation, 5th Battalion, why they see their cultural activism on a local and international level and how their work and art goes in the face of mainstream even left liberal media, music industry and yes some times in our communities of color. The performance will be a mixture of multi media with audio, PowerPoint, Skype presentation with live performances.

Friday May 10th from 3:00 to 5:30.
Location: Alder Hall (located at 1315 NE Campus Pkwy across the street from the pink building)

DIRECTIONS

Alder Hall is located at 1315 NE Campus Pkwy.

Closest bus lines are as follows:

30, 71, 72, 73, 74, 83 (stops at NE Campus Parkway & Brooklyn Ave NE)

25, 30, 49, 65, 67, 68, 70, 75, 372 (stops at NE Campus Parkway & University Way NE)

31, 32, 49, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 83, 372 (stops at NE Campus Parkway & 12th Ave NE)

Planned route schedules for King County Metro can be searched via their website: http://tripplanner.kingcounty.gov/cgi-bin/sched_page.pl

ACCESSIBILITY

Alder Hall itself is not scent free but we are asking people to refrain from wearing fragrances or essential oils the day of the event. We ask that everyone do this so that folks with MCS and chemical injury are able to attend the event. Smokers should wash their hands and mouths with baking soda before the event. We will provide baking soda and scent free soap on site.

Folks who arrive heavily scented and cannot wash off the scent with baking soda will be asked to leave.

To learn more about MCS and being fragrance free check out the following resources:

http://www.peggymunson.com/mcs/fragrancefree.html

http://www.brownstargirl.org/1/post/2012/03/fragrance-free-femme-of-colour-realness-draft-15.html

http://billierain.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/MCS-ACCESSIBILITY-BASICS.pdf

The side entrance is ADA wheelchair accessible and is located on Brooklyn AVE NE and NE 40th Street. The event space is located on the first floor, the space is located just past the doors.

The event will be American Sign Language interpreted.

The event will also be CART captioned.

There are three bathrooms near the event space, one of which is a non-gendered/family bathroom single lock stall with a changing station. Both of the gendered bathrooms also have chair accessible stalls but no changing stations.

There will be soft seating and couches in the event space.

The space itself has natural lighting and uses non-fluorescent lights.

Photos will be taken at the event by a community member, no flash will be used.

Free childcare will be provided, just email asuwswdc@uw.edu with names, ages and access needs of each child.

COLLECTIVE ACCESS + SPACE GUIDELINES

Do not take flash photography at the event

Do not wear fragrances or essential oils on the day of the event

Don’t assume peoples gender and always ask for pronouns! (And remember to ask for peoples pronouns if you meet them again outside of the space)

Don’t make assumptions about what other folk’s access needs are

If people who you are sharing the space with disclose personal information, keep it confidential to the space

Always ask permission before touching or hugging other folks (even if you have an established relationship of touching its always important to ask)!

Be mindful of language and be receptive and calm if folks tell you language you are using is hurtful and oppressive

_______________________________________________

Contact asuwswdc@uw.edu if you are interested in Skyping into the event or have questions and/or concerns about any part of this event.

Do not hesitate to contact us if you have questions on how to contribute to the accessibility of this space!

Broken Bodies, Brainwash Ph.Ds. PBP: Police Brutality Profiling

Posted by admin on May 06, 2013
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Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/368280173281361/?fref=ts

The ASUW Student Disability Commission and the D Center at the University of Washington presents “Broken Bodies, Brainwash Ph.Ds. PBP: Police Brutality Profiling”.

The event is FREE and open to the community. No identification of any kind is needed to attend.

This workshop will focus on how we learn about police brutality against people with disabilities from the streets to organizations to the media to higher education and what it looks like from these avenues and who is speaking and who is not speaking. Activist and recent graduate student Gioioa von Disterlo and disabled activist/cultural worker, Leroy Moore team up to present their work on the issue of police brutality against people with disabilities and how we learn about it in and outside of academic walls, in the community and in non-profit organizations. They will be looking through these multi lenses to get back to the individual and the perception of disability in our community all the way up to higher education including media and in non-profit industrial complex. The workshop will be a mixture of multi-media, critical thinking, poetry, song and exercises.

Friday May 10th from 5:00 to 7:30.
Location: The Ethnic Cultural Center, the Black room (located at 3931 Brooklyn Ave NE across the street from the pink building)

DIRECTIONS

The Ethnic Cultural center is located at 3931 Brooklyn Ave NE, on Brooklyn Ave NE and NE 40th St.

Closest bus lines are as follows:

30, 71, 72, 73, 74, 83 (stops at NE Campus Parkway & Brooklyn Ave NE)

25, 30, 49, 65, 67, 68, 70, 75, 372 (stops at NE Campus Parkway & University Way NE)

31, 32, 49, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 83, 372 (stops at NE Campus Parkway & 12th Ave NE)

Planned route schedules for King County Metro can be searched via their website: http://tripplanner.kingcounty.gov/cgi-bin/sched_page.pl

ACCESSIBILITY

The ECC itself is not scent free but we are asking people to refrain from wearing fragrances or essential oils the day of the event. We ask that everyone do this so that folks with MCS and chemical injury are able to attend the event. Smokers should wash their hands and mouths with baking soda before the event. We will provide baking soda and scent free soap on site.

Folks who arrive heavily scented and cannot wash off the scent with baking soda will be asked to leave.

To learn more about MCS and being fragrance free check out the following resources:

http://www.peggymunson.com/mcs/fragrancefree.html

http://www.brownstargirl.org/1/post/2012/03/fragrance-free-femme-of-colour-realness-draft-15.html

http://billierain.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/MCS-ACCESSIBILITY-BASICS.pdf

The front entrance is ADA wheelchair accessible and is located on Brooklyn AVE NE and NE 40th Street. The event space is located on the second floor, which can be accessed by chair accessible elevators located on the left side, near the entrance lobby area.

The event will be American Sign Language interpreted.

The event will also be CART captioned.

There are three bathrooms near the event space, one of which is a non-gendered single lock stall with a changing station. Both of the gendered bathrooms also have chair accessible stalls and changing stations.

There will be no soft seating in the event space itself.

The space itself has natural lighting and uses non-fluorescent lights.

Photos will be taken at the event by a community member, no flash will be used.

Free childcare will be provided, just email asuwswdc@uw.edu with names, ages and access needs of each child.

COLLECTIVE ACCESS + SPACE GUIDELINES

Do not take flash photography at the event

Do not wear fragrances or essential oils on the day of the event

Don’t assume peoples gender and always ask for pronouns! (And remember to ask for peoples pronouns if you meet them again outside of the space)

Don’t make assumptions about what other folk’s access needs are

If people who you are sharing the space with disclose personal information, keep it confidential to the space

Always ask permission before touching or hugging other folks (even if you have an established relationship of touching its always important to ask)!

Be mindful of language and be receptive and calm if folks tell you language you are using is hurtful and oppressive

_______________________________________________

Contact asuwswdc@uw.edu if you are interested in Skyping into the event or have questions and/or concerns about any part of this event.

Do not hesitate to contact us if you have questions on how to contribute to the accessibility of this space!

Deconstructing Rhetoric on (A)Sexuality with Lydia Brown

Posted by admin on April 23, 2013
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The D Center Presents:

“Deconstructing Rhetoric on Disabled (A)Sexuality with Autistic advocate and activist Lydia Brown!”

The desexualization of disabled people has a long, troubled history of forced medical procedures, laws prohibiting disabled people from marrying, and the widespread denial of age-appropriate sex education for disabled children and youth. The infantilizing presupposition that disabled people should not have agency over their sexuality is profoundly disturbing in its theoretical, political, and practical implications for asexuals, the disabled, and disabled asexuals in particular. Disabled people are assumed to be asexual, incapable of either the cognitive choice to engage in sexual activity or the emotional desire to exist as sexual beings, yet disabled asexuals are presumed to have “chosen” their sexual orientation because of internalized ableism.

These realities reflect the problematic idea that those considered “proper humans” make decisions based on what is rationally advantageous, whereas those who are deemed “subhuman” make decisions out of animalistic or emotional impulses. When applied to the field of sexuality, society mandates that sex should ideally be chosen rationally for objective purposes, often procreation, and not simply for irrational, thoughtless indulgence of animal instincts. As part of this notion, people thought to be “less rational” are thought to be incapable of experiencing a legitimate sexuality. Thus, their sexualities are labeled pathological and taken as further evidence of illness and unreason. This is related to the idea that the knowledge, ideas, experiences, and feelings of privileged people are untainted by personal biases and subjective interpretations, while the knowledge, ideas, experiences, and feelings of oppressed people cannot be removed from such biases and subjectivity. This also mirrors how queer sexualities were likewise classified as a mental illness in the past, wherein society de-legitimized queer sexualities in the same way that disabled sexualities were and are de-legitimized. When applied to theories of sexuality in the context of systemic oppression, the sexual experiences of privileged people are considered to be chosen objectively by reason, while those of oppressed people are deemed irremovable from their bodily desires.

BIO: Lydia Brown is an Autistic and multiply-disabled disability rights activist, scholar, and writer. She interns for the Autistic Self Advocacy Network, and is a member of the Autism NOW National Autism Resource and Information Center National Advisory Committee, the National Council on Independent Living Youth Caucus, the Georgetown University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities Consumer Advisory Council, and the Board of TASH New England. Lydia was the 2012 Patricia Morrissey Disability Policy Fellow at the Institute for Educational Leadership Center for Workforce Development. In 2011, she served on the Adult Services Subcommittee of the Massachusetts Special Commission Relative to Autism, and in early 2012, she served on the National Youth Leadership Network’s Outreach and Awareness Committee. Lydia is a student at Georgetown University, where she is actively working to engage interested students, faculty, staff, and administrators to establish, develop, and sustain a Disability Cultural Center on campus. Her site is www.autistichoya.com.

Access Info:

*Please refrain from wearing scents and fragrances. For more info on how to be scent free check out: http://www.peggymunson.com/mcs/fragrancefree.html.

*Also no flash photography will be taken at the event by a community member.

This event will be ASL interpreted and captioned.

Saturday, April 27th
7PM-9PM
Husky Union Building (HUB), Room 332

There is accessible parking just North of the HUB–”parking lot N22″ on the campus map: http://www.washington.edu/maps/

To request disability accommodation, contact the Disability Services Office at: 206.543.6450 (voice), 206.543.6452 (TTY), 206.685.7264 (fax), or email at dso@u.washington.edu. The University of Washington makes every effort to honor disability accommodation requests. Requests can be responded to most effectively if received as far in advance of the event as possible, preferably at least 10 days.

Please email dcenter@uw.edu with any questions or concerns.

Preview of what’s to come…

Posted by dcenteruw on February 06, 2013
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Good afternoon folks!

The  D Center would like to keep you updated on our progress as we are nearing our opening date. Our grand opening hopefully will take place in late February or early March. We will give y’all a few weeks notice so you can attend our grand opening party!

DSC05338

The D Center’s official space is located in Mary Gates Hall (MGH), room 024 in the basement at the University of Washington, Seattle campus.

DSC05337

DSC05340

Yesterday evening, the three coordinators: Lee, Hannah and Christine, met up to finalize the colors for the walls of the room. We will be using no-VOCs paint for the space! This picture gives you a preview of one of the colors. Woohoo! We are hoping that the space will be painted within the next few weeks, and meanwhile, the furniture is going to be moved in the space as soon as possible!

As we are preparing the opening of the space, we are also planning events for y’all to enjoy! Here are some events that are tentative but dates will be set soon:

  • Leory Moore (March 2013)
  • Samarya Integrated Movement Therapy (March 2013)
  • Interpreter Panel
  • Internalized Ableism Discussion Group (on the receiving end)
  • Possible community/discussion forum on the website
  • Student Advisory Board

We are very excited for the space to open and for the events to be set in motion! If you have any suggestions, please click on the following link for a survey: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/T8PNHY7

Thanks y’all,

dclogo