News & Events

Spring brown bag in School of Social Work, Apr 10, noon

Integrating Disability Studies into the Curriculum of the School of Social Work: Where are we now?

Please join us for the first UW Disability Studies Program brown bag seminar of Spring 2015!

Date: Friday, April 10, 12-1pm

NOTE the Location: School of Social Work Research Commons B (2nd floor, north end of building—use the orange elevator), University of Washington

Presenter: Mary Edwards, Masters of Social Work student

Title: Integrating Disability Studies into the Curriculum of the School of Social Work: Where are we now?

Accessibility:

ASL interpretation and CART captioning will be requested for this event. Please do not wear any scented projects, for the health and safety of our community members with chemical sensitivity.

To request disability accommodation, contact the Disability Services Office, preferably at least 10 days in advance, at: 206.543.6450 (voice), 206.543.6452 (TTY), 206.685.7264 (fax), or email at dso@uw.edu.

Abstract: Mary Edwards is a second-year Masters of Social Work student who in her previous career focused on social justice in education. Her project seeks to lead curriculum change at the UW School of Social Work, so that students will gain a fuller understanding of disability as a social justice issue and be better positioned to serve people with disabilities upon graduation. Mary’s presentation will follow up the October 31st brown bag brainstorming session. Interested people from social work, disability studies, and other communities are invited to come. There will be time for questions sharing your knowledge and perspectives.

Website

Questions to Mary Edwards (marye3@uw.edu) or Joanne Woiak (jwoiak@uw.edu)

SAVE THE DATES for these upcoming Spring DS brownbags, reporting research by 2014 Harlan Hahn Disability Studies Grant awardees!

May 8, 2015, 12-1pm, in the D Center (MGH 024)

Title: An Examination Of The Inclusive Instructional Practices And Accommodations Used For Students With Disabilities In Higher Education And Their Perceived Importance By Instructors

Presenters: Elizabeth A. West, Daniel A. Novak, and Carlyn Mueller, UW College of Education

June 5, 2015, NOTE the time: 12:30-1:30pm, in the D Center (MGH 024)

Title: "Special Education Inclusion in Mexico: Implementation, Resistance, and Communal Benevolence"

Presenter: Douglas Judge, graduate student in UW College of Education

broken art doll

Mar 6, noon: DS talk by Kai Kohlsdorf, GWSS grad student

Sterile Bodies: Re-signifying Sexuality through Trans and Disabled Erotic Performance

Please join us for the final Disability Studies brown bag seminar of Winter quarter!

Kai Kohlsdorf, PhD student in Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies will give a presentation entitled "Sterile Bodies: Re-signifying Sexuality through Trans and Disabled Erotic Performance."

When: Fri, March 6, 2015, 12:00-1:00pm

Where: D Center (MGH 024), University of Washington

Accessibility information:

We will have ASL interpretation and CART captioning for this event.

Please be fragrance free! For the health and safety of community members with chemical sensitivity, please abstain from using scented cosmetics, lotions, or hair products and please do not wear clothes that have recently been smoked in. For more info: http://eastbaymeditation.org/accessibility/PDF/How-to-Be-Fragrance-Free-.pdf

To request disability accommodation, contact the Disability Services Office at: 206.543.6450 (voice), 206.543.6452 (TTY), 206.685.7264 (fax), or email at dso@uw.edu.

Presentation abstract:

I investigate how trans lived experiences hold the weight of medicalization’s forced asexualization narratives of impossible sexual bodies. I argue forced asexualization operates as an enacted disability, on “wrong” bodies, and utilize work within crip theory and disability studies to argue against the easy response that trans people are simply not disabled. I answer the question of how the impossible sexual bodies of trans people and people with disabilities come together through forced asexualization. In utilizing this connection, we open a possibility to shift away from medicalization instead of away from disability. I investigate the realities of disabled sexual practices, including trans sexual practices, that demedicalize sexuality through their embodiments and work to produce new forms of re-signifying sexuality. I argue these sexual practices and their ensuing re-signification work together to produce new forms of collectivity. I take as my object of study trans-centric pornographies created intentionally for trans communities, produced by trans identified individuals as well as performance art by people with disabilities created for people with disabilities, specifically work from T-Wood Pictures, Handbasket Productions, and Sins Invalid. The practices and positionalities enacted by the performers and producers of these performances uncouple sexuality from broken identities as circumscribed by medicalization and open up possibilities to understand sexuality and sexual embodiments of disabled experiences, including trans experiences, as forms of erotic care. This talk is part of the broader dissertation that seeks to thread together queer theory, trans studies, crip theory, and disability studies in investigating new significations of sexuality. 

Please also note: Kai will be teaching a new DIS ST 430 class in Spring 2015: Queering Disability Studies, on Tues/Th 11:30-1:20.

http://depts.washington.edu/disstud/kohlsdorf-brownbag_Mar6-2015

Poster session for disability policy class

SAVE THE DATE! March 11, 2015 9:30-11:30 in the Mary Gates Hall Commons. All are invited to attend this DS student poster session. Students from the Disability Studies 433 course "Disability Law, Policy, and the Community" will present the results of their policy analysis assignment. Presentations will cover a wide range of topics related to disability policy. Specific topics will be posted closer to the date of the event.
book cover Disability Studies Reader

Meet & greet Jeff Brune, Liat Ben-Moshe, Feb 27, 11am, MGH 024

Join us for a Reception and Discussion with Disability Studies Scholars Jeff Brune and Liat Ben-Moshe!

When: Friday, February 27, 2015, 11:00am - 12:30pm

Where: The D Center (Mary Gates Hall 024), University of Washington

Refreshments will be provided!

Come meet & greet Jeff Brune, Associate Professor of History at Gallaudet University, and Liat Ben-Moshe, Assistant Professor of Disability Studies at the University of Toledo.

Accessibility information:

We will have ASL interpretation at this event.

The room is wheelchair accessible.

Please refrain from wearing fragrance/scents. For more info: http://eastbaymeditation.org/accessibility/PDF/How-to-Be-Fragrance-Free-.pdf.

Description:

The Disability Studies Program, Sociology Department, and D Center are co-hosting this reception. We look forward to seeing everyone there on Friday morning to welcome Liat Ben-Moshe and Jeff Brune, and to take part in informal discussion about the field of disability studies and its connections to sociology and history.

Jeff Brune is the co-editor, with Daniel J. Wilson, of the book Disability and Passing: Blurring the Lines of Identity (Temple University Press, 2013), and he is currently working on a monograph Disability Stigma and the Modern American State. Jeff's visit to UW is sponsored by the Sociology Department’s Stice Lectureship, and he will participate in these events:

  • Discussion at UW Bothell on Wed., Feb. 25, 4:30-6:00pm, UW1-280, on disability and passing.
  • Joint lecture with Heather Evans (UW Sociology) on Thurs., Feb. 26, 3:30-5:00pm, Gowen 1A, on Fear of Fakery: Disability Stigma in the Past and Present.

Liat Ben-Moshe is the co-editor of the book Disability Incarcerated: Imprisonment and Disability in the United States and Canada (Palgrave, 2014), as well as special issues of the journal Women, Gender and Families of Color on disability (Spring 2014). Liat's visit to UW is sponsored by the D Center, and she will participate in these events:

  • Lecture on Thurs., Feb. 26, 6:30-8:00pm, HUB 250, on Disability Incarcerated.
  • Workshop on Fri., Feb 27, 7:00-8:30pm, Alder 107, on disability justice and building coalitions across movements.

Meet & greet event website: https://depts.washington.edu/disstud/reception-Brune-Ben-Moshe_Feb27-2015

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/775561315872279/

Questions? Contact Joanne Woiak, Disability Studies, jwoiak@uw.edu

cover of Alison Kafer book "Feminist Queer Crip"

New Spring class: Queering Disability Studies

DIS ST / LSJ / CHID 430, GWSS 490, 5 credits, instructor Kai Kohlsdorf

Queering Disability Studies DIS ST / LSJ / CHID 430, GWSS 490 Spring 2015

5 credits

Instructor: Kai Kohlsdorf

Time: Tues & Thurs, 11:30-1:20

Course description: This course aims to think through what it means to queer an interdisciplinary field of study, specifically disability studies. Despite a substantial lack of engagement with topics of queerness or sexuality within the field of DS, disability is intricately bound to and co-created alongside sex, gender, and sexuality as a socially constructed norm. What might be at work in the erasure of the confluence of these categories? We will use queer theory to highlight and focus on the interconnectedness of systems of domination and how they are implicated and informed by discourses of disability. We will engage with histories of creation of race, class, gender, and sexuality norms to think about how constructions of a normal body have marked abnormal bodies deviant through discourses of lack and excess. We will question how we come to know whose bodies matter and how queer theory and disability studies can learn from each other. We will utilize material from transgender studies, gender studies, sexuality studies, feminist studies, cultural studies, critical race theory, poverty studies, feminist care ethics, and more.

New Spring class: veterans & disability in history

HONORS 392A “Veterans and Disability in History: Perspectives on the Role of Combat Injury in Shaping an American Social Construct”

New disability studies course in Spring 2015!

Honors 392A: Honors Interdisciplinary Study II (I&S/NW)

Course title: “Veterans and Disability in History: Perspectives on the Role of Combat Injury in Shaping an American Social Construct”

Instructor: Josef Mogharreban

M/W 9:30-11:20, MGH 295

Course description:

Throughout human history, war has been a particularly devastating and violent precursor to much of the formulation and development of law, policies, and financial allocation for those killed or wounded in military action and their families. Veterans wounded in combat provide an important glimpse into the broader national narrative regarding people with disabilities. This course examines war and conflict in this country as it relates to both public awareness and acceptance of these individuals as they re-join society, highlighting their influence on laws and policies regarding disability, including its definition. Topics include representation of veterans and war in the media, historical models of disability, military culture with regards to individual disability and difference, cultural memory, and societal and governmental responses with specific emphasis on advocacy from human rights perspectives.

Questions? Contact Josef (josefmo@uw.edu)

book Jeff Brune and Daniel Wilson, Disability and Passing

lecture Fear of Fakery & Disability Stigma, Feb 26, 3:30, Gowen 1A

Sociology Department lecture by Gallaudet University history professor Jeff Brune and UW PhD candidate Heather Evans

Title: Fear of Fakery: Disability Stigma in the Past and Present

Who: Jeff Brune and Heather Evans

Date: Thursday, February 26th

Time: 3:30-5:00 PM

Where: Gowen 1A, University of Washington Seattle


Presentation Abstract:

This project draws upon two studies to provide both macro and micro insights into disability stigma. The first part of the project focuses on how political debates increased the fear of malingering and the stigma of disability, shaping federal disability policies from the 1870s to the present. Jeff Brune, in his forthcoming book Disability Stigma and American Political Culture, documents and offers an explanation for why disability has become more stigmatized in the modern era along with an increasing fear of malingering—that people will fake or exaggerate disabilities in order to take advantage of benefits and avoid work. This fear predates the modern era, but became a feature of political debate during the Civil War pension program of the late nineteenth century. Its impact became even greater in the second half of the twentieth century, as disability benefit programs continued to grow. Ironically, the disability civil rights laws since the 1970s significantly increased the fear of malingering, the surveillance of disabled people, and the stigma of disability. Life history narratives with people with disabilities living in the Pacific Northwest illustrate the internalized fears and suspicions swirling around claiming disability today. As a result, many choose to 'pass' as nondisabled and decide not to draw upon resources and rights provided by disability benefit programs.

Jeff Brune is an Associate Professor of History at Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C. He is the co-editor, with Daniel J. Wilson, of the first major study of disability and passing, Blurring the Lines: Disability, Race, Gender and Passing in Modern America (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2013).

Heather D. Evans is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Sociology and a Fellow in the Comparative Law & Society Studies Program. Her dissertation examines the paradox of 'invisible disability', focusing on legal consciousness among people who have acquired non-evident impairment as adults.

Please direct any questions about this event to Heather Evans (hdevans@uw.edu). This is sponsored by the UW Sociology Stice Lectureship.

Accessibility:

ASL interpretation and CART captioning will be provided.

To request disability accommodation, contact the UW Disability Services Office, preferably at least 10 days in advance: 206.543.6450 (voice), 206.543.6452 (TTY), 206.685.7264 (fax), dso@u.washington.edu.

book Disability Incarcerated editor Liat Ben-Moshe

Liat Ben-Moshe's events hosted by D Center, Feb 26-27

"Disability Incarcerated" lecture, Feb 26, 6:30-8pm, HUB 250; Workshop: Building Coalitions for Movements, Feb 27, 7:00-8:30pm, Alder 107

"Disability Incarcerated" lecture by Liat Ben-Moshe, Thurs. Feb 26, 6:30-8pm, HUB 250

Please be fragrance free! (more access info below)


How can a disability lens help in understanding the rise of the U.S. prison nation and recent and historic acts of police brutality? What happened when people demanded to close down institutions for people who are labeled intellectually or psychiatrically disabled? What can it teach us about present day prisons and their abolition? This talk builds on the analysis of activists and scholars who fought and are fighting for a world with no institutionalization, imprisonment and State policing. 

***Accessibility Info***
ASL interpreters and CART have been requested. The HUB is wheelchair accessible from the main (west) entrance. HUB 250 is on the second floor, with elevators to the right of the main entrance. There will be a scent free seating section next to an air purifier. A single-stall, non-gendered, accessible, scent-free bathroom is located on the third floor of the HUB.

Please be fragrance free! For the health and safety of community members with chemical sensitivity, please abstain from using scented cosmetics, lotions, or hair products and please do not wear clothes that have recently been smoked in. Baking soda will be provided. For more info: http://eastbaymeditation.org/accessibility/PDF/How-to-Be-Fragrance-Free-.pdf
**************************

Liat Ben-Moshe is Assistant Professor of Disability Studies at the University of Toledo. She is the co-editor of Disability Incarcerated: Imprisonment and Disability in the United States and Canada (Palgrave 2014) as well as special issues of Women, Gender and Families of Color on disability (Spring 2014). She is the author of articles and book chapters on such topics as deinstitutionalization and incarceration; the politics of abolition; disability, anti-capitalism and anarchism; queerness and disability; inclusive pedagogy; academic repression; and representations of disability.

This event is supported by the D Center and the Disability Studies Program at the University of Washington (https://www.facebook.com/uwdisabilitystudiesprogram).

To request another disability accommodation, contact the Disability Services Office at: 206.543.6450 (voice), 206.543.6452 (TTY), 206.685.7264 (fax), or email at dhhreq@uw.edu.

Workshop: Building Coalitions for Movements, Fri Feb 27, 7:00-8:30pm, Alder 107

Note: The title of this workshop is subject to change.

Come join fellow local activists in the ongoing community discussion and brainstorming about ways for movements to build coalitions with a emphasis on disability justice and abolition/liberation. 

Prisons don’t make us safer. Psychiatric hospitals don’t make us safer. The police don’t make us safer. Detention centers don’t make us safer. These institutions imprison and commit acts of horrific violence against our queer, trans, disabled, mentally ill, poor, and black communities, and communities of color, especially those most marginalized at the intersections of related oppressions. Let’s bring our movements together so we can build coalitions that can dismantle these institutions from all angles. Using Disability Justice as our uniting framework, we’ll break out into discussion groups led by organizations representing different movements to workshop ways to better connect our movements. Finally, we’ll come back together and share our new ideas and strategies for coalitions and collective action and liberation.

More information to follow!

***Directions***

For more complete directions to the building, please visit the following:http://www.washington.edu/maps/

Directions and parking information will be provided once the location has been finalized.

***Accessibility Info***

ASL interpreters and two CART providers have been requested for small and large group workshopping. More accessibility information will be provided once the location has been finalized.

We ask that you please be fragrance free. For the health and well being of community members with chemical sensitivity, please abstain from using scented cosmetics, lotions, hair products, etc and please do not wear clothes that have recently been smoked in. Baking soda and an air purifier will be provided. For more info: http://eastbaymeditation.org/accessibility/PDF/How-to-Be-Fragrance-Free-.pdf

To request another disability accommodation, contact the Disability Services Office at: 206.543.6450 (voice), 206.543.6452 (TTY), 206.685.7264 (fax), or email at dhhreq@uw.edu.

“FIXED: The Science/Fiction of Human Enhancement,” director producer Regan Brashear. Review quote: "Fascinating, humane, and provocative reframing of conceptions of normal bodies and disability."

Feb 20, 5:15pm, “FIXED” award-winning documentary with director Q&A

FREE screening of the movie "Fixed: The Science/Fiction of Human Enhancement" with a reception and discussion with the director Regan Brashear!

Date: Friday, February 20, 2015

     5:15pm Reception

     6:00pm Screening of the film “FIXED”

     7:00pm Q&A with the director Regan Brashear

Location: Odegaard Undergraduate Library 220, University of Washington Seattle

(on-campus evening parking info: http://www.washington.edu/facilities/transportation/park)

Join us! This event is free and open to the public.

RSVPs are not required, but are requested. To RSVP, contact UW Disability Studies at uwdisabilitystudies@gmail.com.

Facebook event

“Fixed: The Science/Fiction of Human Enhancement” explores the social impact of human augmentation technologies and rethinks “disability” and “normalcy.” The film features commentary by bioethicists, scientists, disability justice activists, disability studies scholars, and futurists, as well as cameo performances by some of the world’s leading integrated dance companies. For more information, go to http://www.fixedthemovie.com.

Trailer (with captions)

Producer/Director Regan Brashear has been working on labor, race, youth, LGBT, and disability issues for over 20 years through documentary film, union organizing, teen theater, community forums, and grassroots activism. Now based in Oakland, CA, Brashear is a co-founder of Making Change Media, a non-fiction film production company which produces short and long form social issue films.

Accessibility information:

ASL interpretation and CART captioning will be provided. The movie will be shown with subtitles. Odegaard Room 220 is wheelchair accessible. Please refrain from wearing fragrance/scents.

To request another disability accommodation, contact the UW Disability Services Office, preferably at least 10 days in advance: 206.543.6450 (voice), 206.543.6452 (TTY), 206.685.7264 (fax), dso@u.washington.edu.

Sponsored by the University of Washington:

Disability Studies Program (http://depts.washington.edu/disstud)

DO-IT AccessSTEM (https://www.washington.edu/doit/programs/accessstem/overview)

D Center (http://depts.washington.edu/dcenter/wordpress)

cover of book Death, Disability and the Superhero, artwork of aging famous superheroes

Book Reading and Q&A with José Alaniz at the University Book Store on 2/17

Death, Disability and the Superhero: The Silver Age and Beyond, Tues, Feb 17th at 7 pm, University Book Store. Book signing follows.

The event should run 60 minutes start-to-finish including 35-45 minute conversation/reading and audience Q&A. Book signing follows.

BOOK BIO:

The Thing. Daredevil. Captain Marvel. The Human Fly. Drawing on DC and Marvel comics from the 1950s to the 1990s and marshaling insights from three burgeoning fields of inquiry in the humanities--disability studies, death and dying studies, and comics studies-- José Alaniz seeks to redefine the contemporary understanding of the superhero. Beginning in the Silver Age, the genre increasingly challenged and complicated its hypermasculine, quasi-eugenicist biases through such disabled figures as Ben Grimm/The Thing, Matt Murdock/Daredevil, and the Doom Patrol.

Alaniz traces how the superhero became increasingly vulnerable, ill, and mortal in this era. He then proceeds to a reinterpretation of characters and series--some familiar (Superman), some obscure (She-Thing). These genre changes reflected a wider awareness of related body issues in the postwar U.S. as represented by hospice, death with dignity, and disability rights movements. The persistent highlighting of the body's "imperfection" comes to forge a predominant aspect of the superheroic self. Such moves, originally part of the Silver Age strategy to stimulate sympathy, enhance psychological depth, and raise the dramatic stakes, developed further in such later series as The Human Fly, Strikeforce: Morituri, and the landmark graphic novel The Death of Captain Marvel, all examined in this volume. Death and disability, presumed routinely absent or denied in the superhero genre, emerge to form a core theme and defining function of the Silver Age and beyond.

About the Author

José Alaniz, Seattle, Washington, is associate professor in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures and the Department of Comparative Literature at the University of Washington-Seattle. He is the author of Komiks: Comic Art in Russia (published by University Press of Mississippi).