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Winter 2015 class: disability & comics

Consider taking this great course taught by José Alaniz. DIS ST/LSJ/CHID 430: Disability in Graphic Narrative 

DIS ST/LSJ/CHID 430: Disability in Graphic Narrative 

VLPA, I&S 

WIN 2015 - TTh 130-320

Instructor: José Alaniz

Consider taking this great winter course! You will explore how the expressive capacities of graphic narrative capture, complicate, and transform the experience of disability.

From a recent Q&A with Professor Alaniz:

Q. Do students really get to read comics in your classes?
A. Absolutely. In fact, those wanting to delve into both comics and disability should consider enrolling in my winter 2015 class, DIS ST 430: “Disability in Graphic Narrative.”

Q. If you were a superhero, what would your super power be?
A. Flying, totally. But then I’d also need invulnerability, because without it flying would quickly kill you. They don’t usually tell you that in the comics.

Course description: This course brings together two burgeoning fields in the Humanities, Comics Studies and Disability Studies, for an exploration of how the expressive capacities of graphic narrative capture, complicate and transform the experience of disability. While mostly focusing on the rich comics memoir literature related to disability and illness that has emerged in the last 25 years, we will touch on other genres, including fantasy and superheroes, and discuss how these works reflect cultural changes regarding the “propriety” of disa­bility as a literary subject. Authors include Charles Burns, Al Davison, Alan Moore, David B., Harvey Pekar and Joyce Brabner.  

CFPs for April conference on accessibility, Ohio State

ADA: Celebrate Our Progress And Write Our Future History, PAPER PROPOSALS, due Jan 5, 2015; STUDENT POSTER COMPETITION, due Mar 11, 2015

The 15th annual conference: Multiple Perspectives on Access, Inclusion & Disability

April 13 - 14, 2015, The Ohio State University's Columbus Campus

This year's conference will celebrate the progress we have made and the journey still ahead for the Americans with Disabilities Act.  What have we learned?  Where are we going? What are the important questions for the next 25 years?

Multiple Perspectives is an ongoing exploration of disability as a reflection of the human condition seen through multiple lenses (theory, discipline, social constructs, personal experience, shared experience...).  Preference will be given to presentations that encourage conversations across the typical divisions (medical and social, education and employment, research and practice, business and government, rights and charity ...) Proposers are encouraged to consider parallels, distinctions and intersections with race, gender and ethnicity.

Past programs and conference updates as they become available can be found at:  http://ada.osu.edu/conferences.htm.

To be on the mailing list for the conference, send e-mail to ADA-OSU@osu.edu<mailto:ADA-OSU@osu.edu>

The Multiple Perspectives Conference is hosted by Ohio State University's ADA Coordinator's Office is made possible thanks to the generosity of the Ethel Louise Armstrong Foundation Endowment Fund and ongoing support from The Ohio State University's Office of Diversity and Inclusion and the Center for Disability Empowerment.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES FOR MULTIPLE PERSPECTIVES 2015

Proposals are due January 5th, 2015

Proposals should be submitted by e-mail as an attachment (Word, Word Perfect, TXT, or RTF formats)  to ADA-OSU@osu.edu<mailto:ADA-OSU@osu.edu>  with Multiple Perspectives 2015 in the subject line.

Proposals must include:

1.    Name of each presenter with  titles,  institutions, employers etc. as appropriate

2.    Contact information (phone, mailing address, and e-mail) if there is more than one presenter please indicate one individual as the contact and lead presenter.

3.    Title of Presentation   (12 words or less)

4.    Description  (700 words or less)   Please describe the content, focus and desired outcomes for the presentation using these questions as a guide.

*       What is the format of the presentation (Lecture, Panel, Discussion, Performance, Other)?

*       Who is the intended audience (educators, employers, businesses, advocates, students, consumers, researchers, or other)?

*       How familiar should the audience be with the topic (beginner, intermediate, advanced)?

*       What are your three main goals for the presentation?

Please Note:  The full conference fees will be waived and lunch provided for presenters of accepted proposals. Presenters are responsible for their own travel and lodging.

Please share with your students:

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENT POSTER COMPETITIONS

At the Fifteenth Annual

Multiple Perspectives on Access, Inclusion & Disability:

Intersections and Independence

April 13 - 14, 2015

Held on The Ohio State University's Columbus Campus

Poster Submissions are Due no later than March 11, 2015

The Multiple Perspectives Conference encourages students to network with professionals, the community, and scholars who share their interests in disability at its annual student poster reception.  A generous gift from the Ethel Louise Armstrong Foundation will fund awards (Graduate Research - $500; Undergraduate Research $200, Art & Performance $200 and Community Service $100, Class Projects $200 at this year's competition.

Submissions may be based on:

1.  Class Projects & Papers (Award goes to Department to support future projects)

2.  Independent & Supervised Student Research

3.  Community Service & Applied Problem Solving from Service Learning Classes or student organizations

4.  Art & Performance

Posters can take a variety of forms including print material mounted on poster board or display panels or arranged on a table; PowerPoint presentations, web pages or video presentations from your laptop ...

* Presentation materials must fit on a 3'x6' table or along 6' or less of wall space

* Presentation materials should present the information in 10 minutes or less

* Presenters or their designee must be present to interact with the audience

* Presenters must provide their own equipment

Visit these sites for tips on developing a poster presentation:

*  http://denman.osu.edu/resources.aspx

*  http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/speaking/poster/index.cfm

*  http://www.plu.edu/~libr/workshops/multimedia/posters.html

Students and teams of students who wish to present a poster must send the following information to ADA-OSU@osu.edu<mailto:ADA-OSU@osu.edu> no later than March 11, 2015

1.  Title

2.  Short Title - 12 word maximum

3.  Poster Format (Print, Model, PowerPoint, Video, ...)

4.  Description of their proposed poster topic - 250 word maximum

5.  E-mail address, phone number, and surface mail address of coordinating presenter

6.  As appropriate, university, department, grant, course or student organization affiliation

7.  A letter of support from a faculty member or organization advisor associated with the project

8.   Name of individual, Department or Organization to receive cash award should the project win.

Early submissions are encouraged.  Submissions will be reviewed as they arrive. Conference fees will be waived and lunch provided for all accepted presenters.

Please Note: The full conference fees will be waived and lunch provided for presenters of accepted proposals. Presenters are responsible for their own travel and lodging.

Disability, design, and human-computer interaction, Dec 5, 12pm, Katie O'Leary

Final brown bag seminar of the quarter: Friday, Dec. 5, 12:00-1:00pm, at the UW D Center (MGH 024). "Engaging Diverse Stakeholders in Technology Design"

 Katie O’Leary, PhD student, iSchool
“Engaging Diverse Stakeholders in Technology Design: A Conversation About Disability and Human-Computer Interaction”
 
Accessibility: We will have CART captioning and ASL interpreting for this event. The space is wheelchair accessible. Please be fragrance free.

To request another disability accommodation, contact the Disability Services Office at: 206.543.6450 (voice), 206.543.6452 (TTY), 206.685.7264 (fax), or email at dso@uw.edu. 

Abstract:

Katie O’Leary is a third-year PhD student in human-computer interaction at the Information School who has an interest in developing methods for engaging people with disabilities and other stakeholders in software design. This talk will highlight her collaborative project (supported by a Harlan Hahn grant) that explores parent perspectives of inclusive play, and will invite discussion about disability and human-computer interaction. 

Let us know you're coming by joining the Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/601498213309819/.

Please join us!! Questions? Contact Joanne (jwoiak@uw.edu). The Winter schedule of monthly brown bag talks will be announced soon. For more information about UW Disability Studies, see https://depts.washington.edu/disstud/.  Thanks to the D Center for hosting the seminars this quarter! https://www.facebook.com/UW.D.Center

2 CFPs for students, due Dec 1 & Mar 11

Call for papers for Society for Disability Studies student panel & Ohio State student poster competition.

SOCIETY FOR DISABILITY STUDIES 2015

Building on the success of last year's efforts, the Society for Disability Studies Student Interest Group is hoping to put together another panel showcasing undergraduate student research at the 2015 Society forDisability Studies Conference.

As conferences are often quite foreign to undergraduates, rather than a CFP for this panel, we are seeking faculty nominations of student research projects. Thus, if you know of any undergraduates doing exciting research in Disability Studies or work that relates to this year's theme of disability and (getting it) right/s, please have them write up a 300-word abstract for their project and forward to it to Sa.Larson@emory.edu along with your "official" nomination of them and their contact info.


Please also explain to your student the financial expense of attending a conference and given the limited scholarships SDS has to give out, perhaps direct them towards possible funds for conference support at your institution. Forthcoming information on a new student scholarship opportunity to help make the conference more affordable will be sent through the listservs. Information will also be posted on the Student Caucus social media pages (links are provided below).

Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/143156312555420/

Twitter:
https://twitter.com/SDS_StudentCauc

As the final deadline for SDS submissions is Monday, December 8, 2014, we ask that you forward these nominations and abstracts by Monday, December 1. We will notify students (and nominators) of acceptances by Friday, December 5.

If you have any questions, please send them to Stephanie Larson at Sa.Larson@Emory.edu
​​

MULTIPLE PERSPECTIVES ON ACCESS, INCLUSION & DISABILITY: INTERSECTIONS AND INDEPENDENCE

Put this semester's assignments to work or create an assignment for the Spring. Recycle, Reuse, Resubmit your student papers & projects.  

http://ada.osu.edu/conferences/2015Conf/2015conf.html

UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STUDENT POSTER COMPETITIONS

At the Fifteenth Annual Multiple Perspectives on Access, Inclusion & Disability: Intersections and Independence

April 13 - 14, 2015

Held on The Ohio State University’s Columbus Campus

Poster Submissions are Due no later than March 11, 2015

The Multiple Perspectives Conference encourages students to network with professionals, the community, and scholars who share their interests in disability at its annual student poster reception.  A generous gift from the Ethel Louise Armstrong Foundation will fund awards (Graduate Research - $500; Undergraduate Research $200, Art & Performance $200 and Community Service $100, Class Projects $200 at this year’s competition. 

Submissions may be based on:

1.  Class Projects & Papers (Award goes to Department to support future projects)

2.  Independent & Supervised Student Research 

3.  Community Service & Applied Problem Solving from Service Learning Classes or student organizations

4.  Art & Performance

Posters can take a variety of forms including print material mounted on poster board or display panels or arranged on a table; PowerPoint presentations, web pages or video presentations from your laptop …  

 Presentation materials must fit on a 3’x6’ table or along 6’ or less of wall space

Presentation materials should present the information in 10 minutes or less

Presenters or their designee must be present to interact with the audience

Presenters must provide their own equipment

Visit these sites for tips on developing a poster presentation:

·  http://denman.osu.edu/resources.aspx

·  http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/speaking/poster/index.cfm

·  http://www.plu.edu/~libr/workshops/multimedia/posters.html  

Students and teams of students who wish to present a poster must send the following information to ADA-OSU@osu.edu no later than March 11, 2015

1.  Title

2.  Short Title - 12 word maximum

3.  Poster Format (Print, Model, PowerPoint, Video, …)

4.  Description of their proposed poster topic – 250 word maximum

5.  E-mail address, phone number, and surface mail address of coordinating presenter

6.  As appropriate, university, department, grant, course or student organization affiliation

7.  A letter of support from a faculty member or organization advisor associated with the project

8.   Name of individual, Department or Organization to receive cash award should the project win.

Early submissions are encouraged.  Submissions will be reviewed as they arrive. Conference fees will be waived and lunch provided for all accepted presenters.

Please Note:

The full conference fees will be waived and lunch provided for presenters of accepted proposals. Presenters are responsible for their own travel and lodging.

Fall quarter DS brown bag talks

MGH 024, Fridays 12-1pm, Oct 10, Oct 31, Nov 7, Dec 5, 2014.

We are pleased to announce a full schedule of seminars (brown bag talks) sponsored Fall quarter 2014 by the Disability Studies Program at the University of Washington.

Time: Fridays, 12 – 1pm.

Dates: Oct 10, Oct 31, Nov 7, and Dec 5 (see descriptions below)

Location: The D Center, Mary Gates Hall 024, University of Washington Seattle (campus map: http://www.washington.edu/maps/). Many thanks to our host the D Center, UW’s Disability and Deaf Cultural Center! (http://depts.washington.edu/dcenter/wordpress/)

These talks will be given by UW students and faculty who were awarded research grants from the Harlan Hahn Endowment Fund. The Fund was established in 2010 by a generous gift to the Disability Studies Program. A complete list of 2014 awardees and their projects can be found on the DS Program website (https://depts.washington.edu/disstud/2014-Hahn-awards).

The DS brown bag seminars are free and public. You are welcome to bring your lunch. ASL interpreting and CART captioning will likely be provided for all the talks.

Please join us!

Schedule of Disability Studies seminars:

Friday, October 10, 12-1pm, MGH 024, Joanne Woiak, “Privacy, Public History, and the Archive.”

     Joanne Woiak is a Lecturer in the DS Program who is especially interested in the history of eugenics and disability. She previously presented this work at the Society for Disability Studies conference on a panel about challenges in recovering and narrating histories of disabled people in and out of institutions. The paper explores the interplay between the concept of privacy in healthcare and disability discourses, public presentations of disability and eugenics history, and disability historians’ strategies to address privacy restrictions on archival research. Copies of the paper will be available at the talk.

Friday, October 31, 12-1pm, MGH 024, Mary Edwards, “Integrating Disability Studies into the Curriculum of the School of Social Work: An Open Discussion.”

     Mary Edwards is a second-year Masters of Social Work student who in her previous career focused on social justice in education. Her project seeks to lead curriculum change at the UW School of Social Work, so that students will gain a fuller understanding of disability as a social justice issue and be better positioned to serve people with disabilities upon graduation. Mary’s brown bag will be a lively brainstorming session. Interested people from social work, disability studies, and other communities are invited to come share your knowledge and perspectives.

Friday, November 7, 12-1pm, MGH 024, Michael Nguyen, “Are We Preparing Future Physicians to Work with People with Disabilities?”

     Michael Nguyen is a second-year medical student who has an MPH and worked several years in healthcare research at the Department of Veterans Affairs. Michael attended the Society for Disability Studies conference in Minneapolis where he shared his experiences of medicine and disability.

Friday, December 5, 12-1pm, MGH 024, Katie O’Leary, “Parents' Perspectives of Technologies for Inclusive Play.”

     Katie O’Leary is a second-year PhD student in human-computer interaction at the Information School who has an interest in developing methods for engaging people with disabilities and other stakeholders in software design. This collaborative project explores parent perspectives of inclusive play between disabled and nondisabled children.

Please note regarding access needs:

The D Center is a fragrance free space. For the health and well being of community members with chemical sensitivity, please abstain from using scented cosmetics, clothing, etc. Baking soda will be provided.

The room is wheelchair accessible. Elevators open right across the hall from the entrance to the Center. ADA bathrooms are located on the same floor.

ASL interpreting and CART captioning will likely be provided for all the talks. Contact Joanne (jwoiak@uw.edu) if you have any questions.

To request another disability accommodation, contact the Disability Services Office at: 206.543.6450 (voice), 206.543.6452 (TTY), 206.685.7264 (fax), or email at dhhreq@uw.edu. Requests can best be addressed if DSO receives them at least 10 days before the event.

book cover "Death, Disability, and the Superhero"

Q&A with José Alaniz

Check out this interview with our new Disability Studies Program Director, José Alaniz!
1. How did you become interested in Disability Studies?
I received my PhD in Comparative Literature at the University of California at Berkeley. I wrote a dissertation on Death and Dying in late/post-Soviet Russia. While at Berkeley, I fell into the orbit of the university’s Disability Studies program. Conversing with and learning from scholars like Susan Schweik and Marsha Saxton really affected my thinking, thought that would bear fruit only after graduate school. If I had to reduce it to one event, it would be a fantastic guest lecture by Rosemarie Garland-Thomson, whose contents eventually saw print in her article “Seeing the Disabled.” 

2. What are your favorite films about disability?
A tough one! Tod Browning’s horror film Freaks (1932) still has a power to shock, while William Wyler’s The Best Years of Our Lives (1946) paints a more sensitive picture, albeit a sentimental one. A film I’m teaching in my current course on Disability in Russian Cinema, Liubov Arkus’ Anton’s Right Here (2012) is a problematic but intriguing “first-person” depiction of autism. Those three come immediately to mind. 

3. How does the representation of disability in comics differ by country?
A very big question; let’s stick with the two comics cultures I know best: the USA and Russia. My upcoming (November, 2014) book Death, Disability and the Superhero: The Silver Age and Beyond tracks the evolution of disability in the superhero genre from about 1960 to 1993. In this era we see an increasing acknowledgment of the disabled as a part of the population, doubtless reflecting their greater visibility as a result of civil rights activism and social pressures which eventually led to the Americans With Disabilities Act in 1990. In Russia, on the other hand, the disabled have historically led much more isolated, invisible, second-class lives. Add to that that Russia had no comics culture in the Western sense (partly due in the 20th century to Soviet disdain for US-type popular culture), and we see until very recently precious few representations of the disabled in Russian comics (which are themselves largely a post-Soviet phenomenon). In this regard I would highlight the work of artists Tatyana Faskhutdinova, Viktoria Lomasko and Yanka Smetanina. I direct those interested to my first book, Komiks: Comic Art in Russia (2010). 

4. Do students really get to read comics in your classes?
Absolutely. In fact, those wanting to delve into both comics and disability should consider enrolling in my winter 2015 class, DIS ST 430: “Disability in Graphic Narrative.”

5. If you were a superhero, what would your super power be?
Flying, totally. But then I’d also need invulnerability, because without it flying would quickly kill you. They don’t usually tell you that in the comics. 

To learn more about his recent book, go here:http://www.upress.state.ms.us/books/1709.

CFP 2015 Society for Disability Studies

Proposals for SDS 2015 due Dec 8, 2014. http://disstudies.org/conferences/atlanta-2015/cfp

The program committee of the 28th annual meeting of the Society for Disability Studies, to be held in Atlanta, GA, invites you to consider the multiple and significant possibilities at the intersections of disability and (getting it) right/s.  We welcome proposals in all areas of disability studies, but especially those submissions premised on this year's theme.

GETTING IT-RIGHT/S.

Disability as/is a civil right, a human right, a social right, an economic right, an educational right, a medical right, a sexual right, an employment right, a voting right, a representational right. All of these, and more. Communities and advocates - locally, nationally, transnationally - have been making efforts to get/gain rights, including recognition, legal and/or cultural; and trying, also, to get it right--to address, analyze, reclaim, revise, redress, recover disability representations in literature, culture, politics, and history. The diversity of global articulations of rights; the emergence of critiques of rights frameworks; and transnational developments such as the recent use of language from the American Disabilities Act in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities -- UNCRPD, present the field of Disability Studies, whose growth has paralleled these trends, with an opportunity to consider disability rights in all of its complexities:

When has disability, or its likeness, been considered within grassroots advocacy movements in political geographies around the globe, including nation-states and indigenous governmentalities, and in regional, local, comparative perspectives? When does disability, or its likeness, enter state law, and under what conditions? How have recent or former projects, languages, questions, policies, issues, movements, and events about disability emerged, traveled, and been contested? What conditions allow national laws to migrate transnationally? Are there shifts in the popular emergence and circulation of disability values, and are these shifts expressed with specific forms of representation? How and where has disability politics allied with, or against, “human rights” and/or decolonial frameworks? How have activists and artists crippled state-sanctioned uses of disability?

Proposals for SDS Atlanta 2015 are due: Monday, December 8, 2014.

For complete information regarding session formats and to submit a proposal, please go to: http://disstudies.org/conferences/atlanta-2015/cfp

Disability Studies Forum and Initiative at the University of Oregon

Read the full story here.

The University of Oregon recently held a Disability Studies forum that brought together scholars from across the Northwest and nation. This event was tied to UO's Disability Studies Initiative, which intends to build a formal program that includes an undergraduate minor and graduate certificate.

Read the full story here.

DS brown bag, Nov 7, on medical curriculum

Join us this Friday, Nov 7, 12-1pm, MGH 024, speaker Michael Nguyen, "Are We Preparing Future Physicians to Work with People with Disabilities?"

Friday, November 7, 12-1pm, MGH 024, Michael Nguyen, “Are We Preparing Future Physicians to Work with People with Disabilities?”

     Michael Nguyen is a second-year medical student who has an MPH and worked several years in healthcare research at the Department of Veterans Affairs. Michael attended the Society for Disability Studies conference in Minneapolis where he shared his experiences of medicine and disability. Next he will present at the American Public Health Association conference. His work is supported by a UW Disability Studies Program Harlan Hahn grant.

Accessibility: We will have CART captioning and ASL interpreting at this event. The space is wheelchair accessible. We ask that you please be fragrance free.

To request another disability accommodation, contact the Disability Services Office at: 206.543.6450 (voice), 206.543.6452 (TTY), 206.685.7264 (fax), or email at dso@uw.edu.

Please join us!

Abstract:

Disability Studies scholars have long critiqued medical professionals’ perspective on and interactions with people with disabilities.  They discuss how some physicians still view people with disabilities as asexual, unemployable, or pitiable.  Scholars also highlight how some clinicians go as far as suggesting assisted dying, despite patients’ affirmation of a high quality-of-life.  For many physicians, disability continues to be viewed as a medical failure.
Reflecting on my experiences as a first-year medical school student, my coursework has centered on the medical model of disability – where the biophysiological mechanism of disease and disability are emphasized, rather than social model of disability.  The only opportunity to learn about disability rights is through internships and involvement with advocacy organizations.  To gain this exposure, I trained at a rehabilitation hospital.  By working with Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation physicians, I have come to recognize how people with disabilities are often ignored and disregarded within medical education and the healthcare system.
Exposure to patients with disabilities is necessary to provide quality medical care.  While we have learned to do a physical exam with nondisabled patients, we would gain a more comprehensive skill set learning from people with disabilities.  Recognizing the appropriate accommodations needed to best serve people with disabilities at this early stage in medical education will help aspiring physicians to challenge their own notions of normalcy.
Without early exposure to people with disabilities, we are inadequately prepared to address the needs of this community, especially given the growing number of the population who may experience disability during their lifetime.  Thus, I recommend that medical education provide students with the opportunities to have more interaction with people with disabilities by integrating chronic care and disability studies into the pre-clinical years of the curriculum.

John Hockenberry photo

John Hockenberry on disability, design, and technology, Town Hall, Nov 11

Sponsored by Washington Access Fund

Journalist John Hockenberry is the host of Public Radio International’s The Takeaway (4 time Emmy Award Winner and 3 time Peabody Award Winner).

Hockenberry is coming to Town Hall Seattle on November 11th, and he will speak about the Future of Universal Design, Assistive Technology, and Disability Rights. His talk will be preceded by an Assistive Technology Exhibit in the Great Hall Lobby.

You can purchase tickets here: http://washingtonaccessfund.org/event/10-year-anniversary-celebration-benefit/

UPDATES: Discounted student tickets are available. Contact Joanne (jwoiak@uw.edu).

Washington Access Fund is also seeking student volunteers to help at this event - free tickets for volunteers. Contact Emerson Sekins (emerson@washingtonaccessfund.org)

Accessibility: Please note that we will have ASL interpreters and CART on stage along with a couple of ASL interpreters available during the cocktail hour and Assistive Technology Exhibit, but it may be difficult to book additional individual interpreters at this time.)

Details

Date: November 11 Time: 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm. Website: http://washingtonaccessfund.org/10-year-anniversary-celebration-benefit/

Venue

Town Hall Seattle 1119 Eighth Avenue , Seattle, WA + Google Map

Organizer

Washington Access Fund Phone: (206) 328-5116 Email: info@washingtonaccessfund.org Website: washingtonaccessfund.org