News & Events

"Invitation to Dance" Mon, Oct 20

3:00 - 5:00pm (Free Admission!) Odegaard Library 220, University of Washington

ITD_flyer_2014.jpeg

"Invitation to Dance"
Join us for a *free* screening of the film "Invitation to Dance" followed by a Q & A with the director, Christian von Tippelskirch.

Monday, October 20
at 3:00pm - 5:00pm (Free Admission!)
Odegaard Undergraduate Library 220, University of Washington

Sponsored by the D Center, the Disability Studies Program, and the Comparative History of Ideas Program at UW.

The film: In 1971, Simi Linton was injured while hitchhiking to Washington to protest the war in Vietnam. Suddenly a young disabled college student, she confronted insidious forms of discrimination she couldn’t have imagined before. Over time she joined forces with a vibrant disability community, and realized that political engagement, love, and dance could once again be central to her life.
Rock n’ Roll, dancing, and sexuality liberated Simi from the shame she felt as a young disabled woman. INVITATION TO DANCE (2014) traces Simi’s first reluctant foray onto the dance floor at a party to present day when dance has become a central theme in her social life, activism, and work. Ultimately, the film is a never-before- told coming out story of disabled people staking their claim to “equality, justice, and a place on the dance floor!”

Link to trailer via Social Justice Film Festival: http://www.socialjusticefilmfestival.org/?page_id=1129

***Accessibility Info***
ASL Interpreters and CART (captioning) will likely be provided. The room is wheelchair accessible, located on the second floor of the library. Please contact Joanne if you have any questions (jwoiak@uw.edu).

We ask that you please be fragrance free. For the health and well being of community members with chemical sensitivity, please abstain from using scented cosmetics, clothing, etc. Baking soda will be provided. For more info: http://eastbaymeditation.org/accessibility/PDF/How-to-Be-Fragrance-Free-.pdf

To request another disability accommodation, contact the Disability Services Office at: 206.543.6450 (voice), 206.543.6452 (TTY), 206.685.7264 (fax), or email at dhhreq@uw.edu.

Simi Linton (Writer, Director, and Producer) is a writer, teacher, and performer. She is the author of Claiming Disability: Knowledge and Identity, the memoir My Body Politic, and numerous articles on disability. Linton was on the faculty at CUNY for 14 years, leaving in 1998 to write and develop her consultancy work.
Simi has worked with filmmakers, artists and cultural institutions (such as The Smithsonian, The Margaret Mead Film Festival and The Public Theater) to shape the presentation of disability in the arts and to increase the representation of works by disabled artists. Linton holds an undergraduate degree from Columbia University, and a Ph.D. from New York University.

Christian von Tippelskirch (Director/Producer) Christian von Tippelskirch has worked domestically and internationally with many major studios and networks, including BMG, Silver Pictures, Showtime, Sony, and Warner Bros. He studied film at Columbia with Milos Forman, Michael Hausman, and Martin Scorsese.
Three Below Zero by Swiss director Simon Aeby was Christian’s first film as producer. Following credits include Dungeons and Dragons II, Highlander -The Source, and Out of the Ashes with Christina Lathi. He produced the US shoots for Roman Polanski’s The Ghost and Carnage. Currently, Christian is producing Jasper Milliken and The Alligator Man, two independent feature films. Invitation to Dance is his first feature length documentary as director/producer. His next documentary Molly of the Mohawks is in post-production. It is about an opera and the role of the Mohawk woman Molly Brant in the American Revolution. Christian was a consultant on John Halpern’s Refuge (a film about Tibetan Buddhism and the Dalai Lama), and Assistant Producer of Satellite Sky (about the race to the moon) for PBS and The American Experience.

Simi Linton and 2 friends smiling and holding banner reading Crip Machine

"Invitation to Dance" film Oct 19 & 20

TWO Seattle screenings of the new documentary "INVITATION TO DANCE": Oct 19 @6:30 @NW Film Forum; Oct 20 @3:00 @UW Ode 220

Sunday, Oct. 19, 2014, 6:30pm, at Northwest Film Forum, 1515 12th Ave. This screening is part of the Social Justice Film Festival (tickets $10).

Monday, Oct 20, 3:00-5:00pm, at UW Seattle Odegaard Library, Room 220 (free).

The Oct 20th screening is free and will include Q&A with the director Christian von Tippelskirch. All are welcome to attend! This screening is sponsored by UW D Center, Disability Studies Program, and CHID Program. ASL interpretation and CART captioning will likely be provided. The room is wheelchair accessible. Please be fragrance-free. FB event page.

INVITATION TO DANCE
*A documentary film*
by Christian von Tippelskirch & Simi Linton

In 1971, Simi Linton was injured while hitchhiking to Washington to protest the war in Vietnam. Suddenly a wheelchair-riding young college student, she confronted insidious forms of discrimination she couldn’t have imagined before. Over time, she joined forces with a vibrant disability community, and realized that political engagement, love, and dancing could once again be central to her life.

OCT 19: Join us to celebrate a new season of social justice films at the festival kickoff party! Enjoy light refreshments and watch a sampling of stellar short films and the feature-length documentary Invitation to Dance. Stay afterward for a Q&A with director Christian von Tippelskirch and a panel discussion about disability rights.  Disability Rights Washington is sponsoring the Oct. 19 event. Additional supporters include the University of Washington D Center and Disability Studies Program.

The Social Justice Film Festival, October 18-30, 2014, also presents nine FREE film screenings on the campus of the University of Washington, Seattle, in partnership with the UW Law, Societies, & Justice Program and Innocence Project Northwest.  FULL FESTIVAL PROGRAM at Socialjusticefilmfestival.org.  For tickets and information.

To request disability accommodation, contact the UW Disability Services Office at: 206.543.6450 (voice), 206.543.6452 (TTY), 206.685.7264 (fax), or email at dhhreq@uw.edu. Requests can best be addressed if DSO receives them at least 10 days before the event.

To Love & Ruckus: A night of sick & disabled performance by acclaimed activist & poet, Kay Ulanday Barrett

Wednesday, October 29, at 6:30pm - 8:30pm, Alder Hall Auditorium

Kay%20Ulanday%20Barrett.jpg

To Love & Ruckus: A night of sick & disabled performance by acclaimed activist & poet, Kay Ulanday Barrett    
Wednesday, October 29
at 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Alder Hall Auditorium

Hosted by the D Center, the Student Disability Commission, and the Queer Student Commission

The event will take place at the UW's Alder Hall Auditorium. The doors open at 6:30 pm and the event start at 7:00 pm.

A 2009 Campus Pride Hot List artist, 2013 Trans Justice Funding Project Panelist, and 2013 Trans 100 Honoree, Kay Ulanday Barrett is a poet, performer, and educator, navigating life as a disabled pin@y-amerikan transgender queer in the U.S. with struggle, resistance, and laughter. K. has featured on colleges & stages globally including; Princeton University, UC Berkeley, NYU, Musee Pour Rire in Montreal, Brooklyn Museum, and The Chicago Historical Society. K’s bold work continues to excite and challenge audiences. K. has facilitated workshops, presented keynotes, and contributed to panels with various social justice communities. Honors include: Finalist for The Gwendolyn Brooks Open-Mic Award and contributions in Poor Magazine, Kicked Out Anthology, Windy City Queer: Dispatches from the Third Coast, Make/Shift, Filipino American Psychology, Asian Americans For Progress, Dapper Q, and Bitch Magazine. K. turns art into action and is dedicated to remixing recipes. See K. online on twitter @kulandaybarrett or kaybarrett.net*BIO 2013-2014


**Accessibility Information**

ASL interpreters and captioning will be provided. The building and ballroom are wheelchair accessible. Bathrooms are on the same floor as the performance, and they will be made all-gender for the evening.

We ask that you please be fragrance free. For the health and well being of community members with chemical sensitivity, please abstain from using scented cosmetics, clothing, etc. Baking soda will be provided. For more info:http://eastbaymeditation.org/accessibility/PDF/How-to-Be-Fragrance-Free-.pdf

To request another disability accommodation, contact the Disability Services Office at: 206.543.6450 (voice), 206.543.6452 (TTY), 206.685.7264 (fax), or email at dhhreq@uw.edu.

Fall quarter DS brown bag talks

MGH 024, Fridays 12-1pm, Oct 10, Oct 31, Nov 7, Dec 5, 2014.

We are pleased to announce a full schedule of seminars (brown bag talks) sponsored Fall quarter 2014 by the Disability Studies Program at the University of Washington.

Time: Fridays, 12 – 1pm.

Dates: Oct 10, Oct 31, Nov 7, and Dec 5 (see descriptions below)

Location: The D Center, Mary Gates Hall 024, University of Washington Seattle (campus map: http://www.washington.edu/maps/). Many thanks to our host the D Center, UW’s Disability and Deaf Cultural Center! (http://depts.washington.edu/dcenter/wordpress/)

These talks will be given by UW students and faculty who were awarded research grants from the Harlan Hahn Endowment Fund. The Fund was established in 2010 by a generous gift to the Disability Studies Program. A complete list of 2014 awardees and their projects can be found on the DS Program website (https://depts.washington.edu/disstud/2014-Hahn-awards).

The DS brown bag seminars are free and public. You are welcome to bring your lunch. ASL interpreting and CART captioning will likely be provided for all the talks.

Please join us!

Schedule of Disability Studies seminars:

Friday, October 10, 12-1pm, MGH 024, Joanne Woiak, “Privacy, Public History, and the Archive.”

     Joanne Woiak is a Lecturer in the DS Program who is especially interested in the history of eugenics and disability. She previously presented this work at the Society for Disability Studies conference on a panel about challenges in recovering and narrating histories of disabled people in and out of institutions. The paper explores the interplay between the concept of privacy in healthcare and disability discourses, public presentations of disability and eugenics history, and disability historians’ strategies to address privacy restrictions on archival research. Copies of the paper will be available at the talk.

Friday, October 31, 12-1pm, MGH 024, Mary Edwards, “Integrating Disability Studies into the Curriculum of the School of Social Work: An Open Discussion.”

     Mary Edwards is a second-year Masters of Social Work student who in her previous career focused on social justice in education. Her project seeks to lead curriculum change at the UW School of Social Work, so that students will gain a fuller understanding of disability as a social justice issue and be better positioned to serve people with disabilities upon graduation. Mary’s brown bag will be a lively brainstorming session. Interested people from social work, disability studies, and other communities are invited to come share your knowledge and perspectives.

Friday, November 7, 12-1pm, MGH 024, Michael Nguyen, “Are We Preparing Future Physicians to Work with People with Disabilities?”

     Michael Nguyen is a second-year medical student who has an MPH and worked several years in healthcare research at the Department of Veterans Affairs. Michael attended the Society for Disability Studies conference in Minneapolis where he shared his experiences of medicine and disability.

Friday, December 5, 12-1pm, MGH 024, Katie O’Leary, “Parents' Perspectives of Technologies for Inclusive Play.”

     Katie O’Leary is a second-year PhD student in human-computer interaction at the Information School who has an interest in developing methods for engaging people with disabilities and other stakeholders in software design. This collaborative project explores parent perspectives of inclusive play between disabled and nondisabled children.

Please note regarding access needs:

The D Center is a fragrance free space. For the health and well being of community members with chemical sensitivity, please abstain from using scented cosmetics, clothing, etc. Baking soda will be provided. For more info: http://eastbaymeditation.org/accessibility/PDF/How-to-Be-Fragrance-Free-.pdf.

The room is wheelchair accessible. Elevators open right across the hall from the entrance to the Center. ADA bathrooms are located on the same floor.

ASL interpreting and CART captioning will likely be provided for all the talks. Contact Joanne (jwoiak@uw.edu) if you have any questions.

To request another disability accommodation, contact the Disability Services Office at: 206.543.6450 (voice), 206.543.6452 (TTY), 206.685.7264 (fax), or email at dhhreq@uw.edu. Requests can best be addressed if DSO receives them at least 10 days before the event.

John Hockenberry photo

John Hockenberry on disability, design, and technology, Town Hall, Nov 11 (tickets required)

Sponsored by Washington Access Fund

Journalist John Hockenberry is the host of Public Radio International’s The Takeaway (4 time Emmy Award Winner and 3 time Peabody Award Winner).

Hockenberry is coming to Town Hall Seattle on November 11th, and he will speak about the Future of Universal Design, Assistive Technology, and Disability Rights. His talk will be preceded by an Assistive Technology Exhibit in the Great Hall Lobby.

You can purchase tickets here: http://washingtonaccessfund.org/event/10-year-anniversary-celebration-benefit/

Details

Date: November 11 Time: 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm. Website: http://washingtonaccessfund.org/10-year-anniversary-celebration-benefit/

Venue

Town Hall Seattle 1119 Eighth Avenue , Seattle, WA + Google Map

Organizer

Washington Access Fund Phone: (206) 328-5116 Email: info@washingtonaccessfund.org Website: washingtonaccessfund.org

CFP 2015 Society for Disability Studies

Proposals for SDS 2015 due Dec 8, 2014. http://disstudies.org/conferences/atlanta-2015/cfp

The program committee of the 28th annual meeting of the Society for Disability Studies, to be held in Atlanta, GA, invites you to consider the multiple and significant possibilities at the intersections of disability and (getting it) right/s.  We welcome proposals in all areas of disability studies, but especially those submissions premised on this year's theme.

GETTING IT-RIGHT/S.

Disability as/is a civil right, a human right, a social right, an economic right, an educational right, a medical right, a sexual right, an employment right, a voting right, a representational right. All of these, and more. Communities and advocates - locally, nationally, transnationally - have been making efforts to get/gain rights, including recognition, legal and/or cultural; and trying, also, to get it right--to address, analyze, reclaim, revise, redress, recover disability representations in literature, culture, politics, and history. The diversity of global articulations of rights; the emergence of critiques of rights frameworks; and transnational developments such as the recent use of language from the American Disabilities Act in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities -- UNCRPD, present the field of Disability Studies, whose growth has paralleled these trends, with an opportunity to consider disability rights in all of its complexities:

When has disability, or its likeness, been considered within grassroots advocacy movements in political geographies around the globe, including nation-states and indigenous governmentalities, and in regional, local, comparative perspectives? When does disability, or its likeness, enter state law, and under what conditions? How have recent or former projects, languages, questions, policies, issues, movements, and events about disability emerged, traveled, and been contested? What conditions allow national laws to migrate transnationally? Are there shifts in the popular emergence and circulation of disability values, and are these shifts expressed with specific forms of representation? How and where has disability politics allied with, or against, “human rights” and/or decolonial frameworks? How have activists and artists crippled state-sanctioned uses of disability?

Proposals for SDS Atlanta 2015 are due: Monday, December 8, 2014.

For complete information regarding session formats and to submit a proposal, please go to: http://disstudies.org/conferences/atlanta-2015/cfp

CFP Jan 2015 for Pacific Rim Conference on Disability and Diversity

May 18 & 19, 2015 - Hawai'i Convention Center in Honolulu, HI

For the 31st edition, Pac Rim is merging and partnering with another conference, so there is sure to be plenty of surprises! 

The Pacific Rim International Conference, considered one of the most ‘diverse gatherings’ in the world, encourages and respects voices from “diverse” perspective across numerous areas, including: voices from persons representing all disability areas; experiences of family members and supporters across all disability and diversity areas; responsiveness to diverse cultural and language differences; evidence of researchers and academics studying diversity and disability; stories of persons providing powerful lessons; examples of program providers, and; action plans to meet human and social needs in a globalized world.

In 2015, new topic areas will promote thoughtful discussion and suggest new ways to integrate education, technology, advocacy, activism and interdisciplinary research. We all strive to strengthen communities and enhance the lives of all human beings. Together, we can harness the tremendous synergy generated by the intermingling and cross-fertilization of diverse perspectives, and ‘spread the word’ as we continue our professional and personal life journey.

Take your first steps to the islands by visiting the website: www.pacrim.hawaii.edu. Your ideas, suggestions and enthusiasm are welcome. Then join up in Waikiki, Hawaii, May 18 & 19, 2015.

book cover "Death, Disability, and the Superhero"

Q&A with José Alaniz

Check out this interview with our new Disability Studies Program Director, José Alaniz!
1. How did you become interested in Disability Studies?
I received my PhD in Comparative Literature at the University of California at Berkeley. I wrote a dissertation on Death and Dying in late/post-Soviet Russia. While at Berkeley, I fell into the orbit of the university’s Disability Studies program. Conversing with and learning from scholars like Susan Schweik and Marsha Saxton really affected my thinking, thought that would bear fruit only after graduate school. If I had to reduce it to one event, it would be a fantastic guest lecture by Rosemarie Garland-Thomson, whose contents eventually saw print in her article “Seeing the Disabled.” 

2. What are your favorite films about disability?
A tough one! Tod Browning’s horror film Freaks (1932) still has a power to shock, while William Wyler’s The Best Years of Our Lives (1946) paints a more sensitive picture, albeit a sentimental one. A film I’m teaching in my current course on Disability in Russian Cinema, Liubov Arkus’ Anton’s Right Here (2012) is a problematic but intriguing “first-person” depiction of autism. Those three come immediately to mind. 

3. How does the representation of disability in comics differ by country?
A very big question; let’s stick with the two comics cultures I know best: the USA and Russia. My upcoming (November, 2014) book Death, Disability and the Superhero: The Silver Age and Beyond tracks the evolution of disability in the superhero genre from about 1960 to 1993. In this era we see an increasing acknowledgment of the disabled as a part of the population, doubtless reflecting their greater visibility as a result of civil rights activism and social pressures which eventually led to the Americans With Disabilities Act in 1990. In Russia, on the other hand, the disabled have historically led much more isolated, invisible, second-class lives. Add to that that Russia had no comics culture in the Western sense (partly due in the 20th century to Soviet disdain for US-type popular culture), and we see until very recently precious few representations of the disabled in Russian comics (which are themselves largely a post-Soviet phenomenon). In this regard I would highlight the work of artists Tatyana Faskhutdinova, Viktoria Lomasko and Yanka Smetanina. I direct those interested to my first book, Komiks: Comic Art in Russia (2010). 

4. Do students really get to read comics in your classes?
Absolutely. In fact, those wanting to delve into both comics and disability should consider enrolling in my winter 2015 class, DIS ST 430: “Disability in Graphic Narrative.”

5. If you were a superhero, what would your super power be?
Flying, totally. But then I’d also need invulnerability, because without it flying would quickly kill you. They don’t usually tell you that in the comics. 

To learn more about his recent book, go here:http://www.upress.state.ms.us/books/1709.

Joanne Woiak, Oct 10 @noon, MGH 024

Please join us for the first DS brown bag seminar of the year!

Friday, October 10, 12-1pm, MGH 024 (the D Center), Joanne Woiak, “Privacy, Public History, and the Archive.”

Joanne Woiak is a Lecturer in the DS Program who is especially interested in the history of eugenics and disability. She previously presented this work at the Society for Disability Studies conference on a panel about challenges in recovering and narrating histories of disabled people in and out of institutions. The paper explores the interplay between the concept of privacy in healthcare and disability discourses, public presentations of disability and eugenics history, and disability historians’ strategies to address privacy restrictions on archival research. Copies of the paper will be available at the talk. ASL interpretation will be provided.

Location: The D Center, Mary Gates Hall 024, University of Washington Seattle (campus map: http://www.washington.edu/maps/). Many thanks to our host the D Center, UW’s Disability and Deaf Cultural Center! (http://depts.washington.edu/dcenter/wordpress/)

These talks will be given by UW students and faculty who were awarded research grants from the Harlan Hahn Endowment Fund. The Fund was established in 2010 by a generous gift to the Disability Studies Program. A complete list of 2014 awardees and their projects can be found on the DS Program website (https://depts.washington.edu/disstud/2014-Hahn-awards).

The DS brown bag seminars are free and public. You are welcome to bring your lunch.

Please note regarding accessibility:

The D Center is a fragrance free space. For the health and well being of community members with chemical sensitivity, please abstain from using scented cosmetics, clothing, etc. Baking soda will be provided. For more info: http://eastbaymeditation.org/accessibility/PDF/How-to-Be-Fragrance-Free-.pdf.

The room is wheelchair accessible. Elevators open right across the hall from the entrance to the Center. ADA bathrooms are located on the same floor.

To request another disability accommodation, contact the Disability Services Office at: 206.543.6450 (voice), 206.543.6452 (TTY), 206.685.7264 (fax), or email at dhhreq@uw.edu. Requests can best be addressed if DSO receives them at least 10 days before the event.

underwater wheelchair

Screening of FIXED, featuring DS Faculty

The Varsity Theater is screening the documentary FIXED on October 9 (7-9 p.m.).

This screening is organized by the UW Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering, and is a fundraiser for the neuroethics group there. After the film, there will be a panel of speakers, including Joanne Woiak from UW Disability Studies, Kayla Brown from DO-IT, and Sara Goering from UW Philosophy and Disability Studies. Cost is $5/student with ID, and $10 for others. 

A haunting, subtle, urgent documentary, FIXED questions commonly held beliefs about disability and normalcy by exploring technologies that promise to change our bodies and minds forever. Told primarily through the perspectives of five people with disabilities: a scientist, journalist, disability justice educator, bionics engineer and exoskeleton test pilot, FIXED takes a close look at the implications of emerging human enhancement technologies for the future of humanity.

Patty Berne works at the Center for Genetics and Society as Project Director on Race, Disability and Eugenics, where she focuses on raising awareness about the ethical implications of emerging prenatal screening technologies. Fernanda Castelo works with Ekso Bionics as a test pilot, helping them develop the Ekso, a bionic exoskeleton which allows people with no or limited function in their legs to walk. Engineer Hugh Herr runs the Biomechatronics Lab at the MIT Media Lab where he designs bionic legs which allow himself, a double amputee, and others, to rock climb, trail run, play tennis, etc. John Hockenberry is an Emmy and Peabody award winning journalist, author, radio host (WNYC?s ?The Takeaway?) and distinguished fellow at the MIT Media Lab, where he works to promote research into human-machine collaborations. Gregor Wolbring is a biochemist and ability studies scholar at the University of Calgary, in Calgary, Alberta, who lectures worldwide on human enhancement technologies and ableism. 

Info on the film: http://www.fixedthemovie.com