Our Research: Faculty/Research Laboratories

 

Katya Rubinow, MD

Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Nutrition

Email Address: rubinow@u.washington.edu

Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Nutrition Website:  http://depts.washington.edu/metab/

Katya Rubinow

Background:

Dr. Rubinow did her undergraduate work at Harvard University and subsequently received her MD from the Yale School of Medicine.  She completed the Internal Medicine Residency program at the University of Pennsylvania and thereafter moved to Seattle for fellowship training in endocrinology at the University of Washington.  Dr. Rubinow pursued her research training under the mentorship of Drs. Stephanie Page, MD, PhD, and Karin Bornfeldt, PhD.  She completed her fellowship in 2012 and now serves as an Assistant Professor in the Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology, and Nutrition.  Her inpatient and outpatient clinical efforts are centered at Harborview Medical Center, and she performs both clinical and basic research in metabolism at the UW and UW-South Lake Union campuses.

Focus:

Dr. Rubinow’s work centers on the role of sex steroids in metabolism.  Her current studies examine the effects of differential sex steroid exposure on insulin sensitivity and body composition in men and male mice.  She further is investigating the impact of sex steroid signaling on paracrine function in macrophages.

Metabolic effects of Sex Steroids in Men: Impact on Adipose Tissue and Insulin Resistance  
In a collaborative effort with Dr. Page, Dr. Rubinow is Principal Investigator of an ongoing clinical study investigating the effects of androgen and estrogen exposure on metabolic outcomes in men.  Reduced androgen exposure in men has been associated with increased fat mass and risk of insulin resistance and diabetes, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood.  Dr. Rubinow’s current study is designed to examine changes in insulin sensitivity and body composition consequent to acute sex steroid withdrawal in men.  Further, this study will identify in parallel the cellular and molecular changes that occur in adipose tissue after sex steroid deprivation.

Sex Steroids and Macrophage Biology
Through both mouse models and in vitro studies, Dr. Rubinow is working to help elucidate the effects of sex steroid signaling in macrophages.  She is particularly interested in how androgens and estrogens influence the paracrine functions of macrophages in adipose tissue and how these altered functions may contribute to the increased adiposity and insulin resistance observed in both men and women after sex steroid withdrawal.

Representative Publications:

Rubinow KB, Snyder CN, Amory JK, Hoofnagle AN, and Page ST. (2012) Acute testosterone deprivation reduces insulin sensitivity in men. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf) 76:281-288.  PMCID:  PMC3224202

Rubinow KB, Tang C, Hoofnagle AN, Snyder CN, Amory JK, Heinecke JW, and Page ST. (2012) Acute sex steroid withdrawal increases cholesterol efflux capacity and HDL-associated clusterin in men. Steroids 77:454-460.  PMCID:  PMC3304018

Rubinow KB, Vaisar T, Tang C, Matsumoto AM, Heinecke JW, and Page ST. (2012) Testosterone replacement therapy in hypogonadal men alters the HDL proteome but not does affect HDL cholesterol efflux capacity. J Lipid Res 53:1376-1383.  PMCID:  PMC3371249

Rubinow KB, Wall VZ, Nelson J, Mar D, Bomsztyk K, Askari B, Lai M, Smith KD, Han MS, Vivekanandan-Giri A, Pennathur S, Albert CJ, Ford DA, Davis RJ, and Bornfeldt KE. (2013) Acyl-CoA synthetase 1 is induced by Gram-negative bacteria and lipopolysaccharide and is required for phospholipid turnover in stimulated macrophages. J Biol Chem 288:9957-9970.

  • Pickar D and Rubinow K. (2000) Pharmacogenomics of Schizophrenia in Molecular Genetics of Mental Disorders.

    Pickar D and Rubinow K. (2001) Pharmacogenomics of psychiatric disorders.  Trends in Pharmacological Science 22:75-83.

    Shansky RM, Rubinow K, Brennan A, and Arsten AF. (2006) The effects of sex and hormonal status on restraint stress-induced working memory impairment. Behav Brain Funct 2:8.

    Rubinow DR, Miller A, and Rubinow KB. (2010) DMS-V: an opportunity to embrace the future of psychiatric diagnosis. Arch Womens Ment Health 13:3-4.

    Rubinow KB and Hirsch IB. (2011) Reexamining metrics for glucose control. JAMA 305:1132-3.

    Rubinow KB, Amory JK, and Page ST. (2011) Androgens exert sexually dimorphic effects on angiogenesis: novel insight into the relationship between androgens and cardiovascular disease. Asian J Androl 13: 626-627.

    Lee A, Rubinow KB, Roth M, Bremner WJ, Page ST, and Amory JK. (2011)  Pharmacokinetics of modified slow-release oral testosterone over nine days in normal men with experimental hypogonadism. J. Androl 33:420-426.

    Rubinow KB, Snyder CN, Amory JK, Hoofnagle AN, and Page ST. (2012) Acute testosterone deprivation reduces insulin sensitivity in men. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf) 76:281-288.  PMCID:  PMC3224202

    Rubinow DR, Crowder VL, Schmidt PJ, and Rubinow KB. (2012) Psychoneuroendocrinology in Handbook of Neuroendocrinology.

    Rubinow KB, Tang C, Hoofnagle AN, Snyder CN, Amory JK, Heinecke JW, and Page ST. (2012)
    Acute sex steroid withdrawal increases cholesterol efflux capacity and HDL-associated clusterin in men. Steroids 77:454-460.  PMCID:  PMC3304018

    Rubinow KB, Vaisar T, Tang C, Matsumoto AM, Heinecke JW, and Page ST. (2012) Testosterone replacement therapy in hypogonadal men alters the HDL proteome but not does affect HDL cholesterol efflux capacity. J Lipid Res 53:1376-1383.  PMCID:  PMC3371249

    Rubinow KB and Page ST. (2012) Testosterone, HDL, and cardiovascular risk in men: the jury is still out.  Clin Lipidol 7:363-365.

    Rubinow KB and Bornfeldt KE. (2012) Microvascular management of systemic insulin sensitivity. Circ Res 111:951-953.

    Rubinow KB, Wall VZ, Nelson J, Mar D, Bomsztyk K, Askari B, Lai M, Smith KD, Han MS, Vivekanandan-Giri A, Pennathur S, Albert CJ, Ford DA, Davis RJ, and Bornfeldt KE. (2013) Acyl-CoA synthetase 1 is induced by Gram-negative bacteria and lipopolysaccharide and is required for phospholipid turnover in stimulated macrophages. J Biol Chem 288:9957-9970.

Current Collaborations:

Within the Diabetes and Obesity Center of Excellence and its Affiliated Members
Stephanie Page, MD, PhD
Jay Heinecke, MD
Greg Morton, PhD
Alan Chait, MD
Mario Kratz, PhD