Meet our 2013-2014 Early Identification Program  Presidential Scholars!

 

Amanda Cortez
Faculty Mentor: Devon Peña

Daughter of an immigrant and former farm worker from Mexico, Amanda was born and raised in Washington. She spent her first year of college at San Diego State University in the Anthropology and Honors programs. During her one year there, she volunteered with the International Rescue Committee at a local high school in a program to help refugee students apply for college. After transferring to UW, she travelled abroad to Peru where she studied and volunteered for a semester with ProWorld Service Corps. While living in Cusco, she worked in the small community of Ocorruro on the Healthy Homes Sustainability project. Next, she traveled though Bolivia and Northern Peru on her way to Ecuador, where she joined the Honors International Studies in Writing and Sustainable Practices Program. Upon returning from six months in South America, Amanda turned her focus to primate studies and was accepted into the Anthropology Departmental Honors program. She has since then been conducting research for her senior thesis.

Daughter of an immigrant and former farm worker from Mexico, Amanda was born and raised in Washington. She spent her first year of college at San Diego State University in the Anthropology and Honors programs. During her one year there, she volunteered with the International Rescue Committee at a local high school in a program to help refugee students apply for college. After transferring to UW, she travelled abroad to Peru where she studied and volunteered for a semester with ProWorld Service Corps. While living in Cusco, she worked in the small community of Ocorruro on the Healthy Homes Sustainability project. Next, she traveled though Bolivia and Northern Peru on her way to Ecuador, where she joined the Honors International Studies in Writing and Sustainable Practices Program. Upon returning from six months in South America, Amanda turned her focus to primate studies and was accepted into the Anthropology Departmental Honors program. She has since then been conducting research for her senior thesis.

Her current research interests include the interface between human and nonhuman primates and the dominance hierarchy that governs the relationship between the two groups. Rather than attempting to raise other primates to human status, her research is focused on deconstructing the human imposed hierarchy that uses use non-human primates to benefit humanity. The goal of this research is to understand how humans are able to reduce other primates, including humans, to a lower status. In order to complete her multi-sited project, she is conducting research at the Woodland Park Zoo, Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest, and a research lab.

Amanda is a Mary Gates Scholar, a Presidential Scholar and a participant in the Early Identification Program. All of this would not be possible without the amazing amount of support from her advisor, Dr. Peña, and all of the encouraging professors that she has met along the way. She is also incredibly grateful for the support she has received from the EIP and its staff. With their continued support, she will pursue a Ph.D. in Anthropology after she graduates in June.

 

Cynthia Irene (Princess) Simekha
Faculty Mentor: Victoria Lawson and Matthew Sparke

 Cynthia Simekha is a senior in the Public Health and Global health Departments. Currently, her intended area of research is health disparities in Africa; mainly her focus is on the social determinants of health and inequality among youth (especially males). This is because most of the people and programs launched in Africa focus on women and girls thus forgetting about men and boys. Cynthia, who likes to be addresses as “African Princess” or “Princess Adanma” (which means the first beautiful, intelligent, and kind daughter), was born and raised in Kenya. Additionally, she speaks more than 8 languages and has visited many countries in Africa. She is also active in academic and non-academic organizations such as LSAMP, USPHA, MAPS, Trio-SSS, Global Health Group, and ASA (African Student Association). She plans to pursue a doctoral degree in Public Health with a specialty in community health and health policy and management. In the future, she hopes to start an organization that will empower and guide children from low-income households who have passion in Social Sciences and Arts to expand their understanding of these fields and guide them to achieve their dreams both academically and socially. Her hobbies include sculpting, drawing, painting, graphic design, photography, travelling, cooking, nature walks, and dancing. Lastly, Princess would like to pass her regards to Mr. & Mrs. Carlos Simekha, Ismael, Tracy, Luda, Mama Josephine A., Sambula M., Andrea Griggs, Trio at Bellevue College and UW, McNair scholar advisors, family and friends for the endless support.

 

For further information related to Presidential and Boeing Scholarships please click theses links:

Presidential Scholarship Information

 

Past Scholars

2012-2013 Presidential Scholars

2011-2012 Presidential Scholars

2010-2011 Presidential Scholars

2009-2010 Presidential Scholars

2008-2009 Presidential Scholars

2007-2008 Presidential Scholars
2006-2007 Presidential Scholars

2005-2006 Presidential Scholars 
2004-2005 Presidential Scholars 
2003-2004 Presidential Scholars 
2002-2003 Presidential Scholars 
2001-2002 Presidential Scholars 
2000-2001 Presidential Scholars 
1999-2000 Presidential Scholars

 

 

 

2008-2009Boeing/OMA Scholars

2007-2008 Boeing/OMA Scholars
2006-2007 Boeing/OMA Scholars

2005-2006 Boeing/OMA Scholars 
2004-2005 Boeing/OMA Scholars

 

Contact us today!

EIP is sponsored by The Office of Minority Affairs.

Early Identification Program 
173G Mary Gates Hall - Box 352803 
University of Washington 
Seattle, Washington 98195-5845 
206-543-6460 
eip@u.washington.edu