Early Identification Program

 

Back to Weekly Announcement Page

Interesting News, Events, and Courses    

[Scroll to the bottom of the page for interesting upcoming courses]


Appliations now being accepted for the 2014-2015 EIP Presidential Scholars! Download the application here.

Question? Email eip@uw.edu



You are invited to join the Foundation for International Understanding Through Students (FIUTS) in welcoming over 2,000 new international students to the University of Washington as an information session presenter this September! 

FIUTS International Student Orientation is a 10-day program for international undergraduate, graduate, and exchange students and scholars beginning their studies at the UW. The orientation program includes social events and informational sessions designed to introduce students to important resources on and off campus, make friendships, explore our city, and support a smooth transition to the UW community. 

From Tuesday, September 16th through Friday, September 19th, over 40 information sessions will be offered to new international students on a variety of topics. Sessions take place in the HUB, with two to three sessions running concurrently, and each session lasting about 50-minutes. Attendance ranges from 25-150 students per session. This year, sessions will be offered in six thematic areas: Campus Resources, Seattle Community, American Culture, Jobs & Internships, Housing, and Health & Wellness. Sessions can be presented by multiple presenters - from campus and the community - and in various formats. We encourage collaborative, creative and interactive session proposals!  

To Submit a Session Proposal
Please complete a short online session proposal form by June 13, 2014. Selected presenters will be notified and schedule in July. 

On behalf of the new students joining our community, thanks in advance for your support! 




Title:  Our Bodies Are Sacred - An Anthology of Writing, Visual Art, and Performance by and for Indigenous Queer and Trans Chamorus


Deadline: July 1, 2014

Site:  ourbodiesaresacred.tumblr.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ourbodiesaresacred 

PURPOSE

Queer and Trans Chamoru histories are said to be non-existent, yet we are living and breathing testimony to the contrary.  As we struggle to define who we are as Indigenous Chamoru peoples, we are reminded that all our futures are linked.  Self-determination also means the freedom to practice the fullness of our genders and sexualities within our Indigenous communities—we call this the sacred, sovereignty of the body.

Chamoru people utilize the power of words, art, and performance to share and create wisdom.  In the tradition of our ancestors, we seek to anthologize Queer and Trans Chamoru cultural work, so that our complex histories will be remembered and made visible, not forgotten or made invisible.


GUIDELINES

We prioritize submissions from Chamoru FTM, MTF, trans, lesbian, gay, bisexual, butch, femme, gela, palaoana, maamflorita, queer, genderqueer, genderfluid and questioning people—regardless of age, ability, or location.

E-mail up to 5 individual, original pieces of work. Previously published work will be accepted as long as you retain the copyrights and provide information on where the work was previously published (name of periodical, date and volume).

Along with your work, submit a separate Cover Letter that includes your name and a100-word limit bio (describing your cultural, gender, and sexual identities and current island or country of residence).

You are also welcome to enter submissions under a pseudonym.


GENRES & FORMATS

poetry, short stories, essays, interviews, scripts (.doc, each piece should not exceed 10 pages)
visual art (.jpg, hi-resolution)
songs (.mp3  or  .wav)
performance videos (provide a URL to the video)

**We highly encourage submissions in the Chamoru language.  Please include translations for selection purposes.


THEMES

Romantic Relationships
Sex and Sinexyness
Diaspora and Migration, Growing Up/Moving “Off Island”
“Coming Out” and Coming To
Biological and/or Chosen Family Experiences
School, Church, Military, or Government Experiences
Disability and Ableism
Sex Work and Sex Trafficking
Mixed-Race Identities
Houselessness and Landlessness
Trauma, Healing, Health
Traditions, Language, Cultural Work
Local and Global Activisms
Visionary Futurisms/Science Fiction for Liberation


NOTIFICATIONS & QUESTIONS

We will get back to you with a decision within 3 months of the deadline.

Feel free to e-mail us regarding the status of your submissions:  ourbodiesaresacred@gmail.com

Selected pieces will be published on our official website and will also be available for download in ‘zine format.


EDITORS

Roldy Aguero Ablao
dåko’ta alcantara-camacho
Fanai Castro
Monaeka Flores
Jacob Martinez Perez
Jaye Sablan
Lehua M. Taitano

Nicole Masangkay, Director
ASUW Queer Student Commission
Email | Office Hours | Facebook
HUSKY UNION BUILDING 131P





Summer 2014 Seminars



Renewable Energy and Bioenergy

BSE 190B: 5 credits

online class

Summer quarter 2014 B

term only, SLN 10594

NW /  I/S credits




No Prerequisites!


JSIS C 201
Introduction to World Religions: Western Traditions
TTh 1:30-3:20
Wellman


JSIS C 322
The Gospels and Jesus of Nazareth

MW 9:30-11:20
Williams


NW/IS online and no extra fee, please consider sending to your students:

BSE 190A: “Renewable Energy and Bioenergy”

Sln: 10593

Summer Quarter 2014 (5 credits)
A term only    
- INTERNET CLASS -




AIS 377: Introduction to Native American Literature

(offered jointly with ENGL 359 A)

B-TERM
Instructor: Carol Warrior

5 credits, VLPA

MTWTh 10:20-12:30

SLN 14373


"Introduction to Native American Literature" will introduce students to some recurring issues addressed by Native American authors, such as concepts of Indigenous identity, misrepresentation of Native peoples, differences between Native and non-Native worldviews, engagement with Native communities, Indigenous futures, and decolonization. Building on the conversations initiated in novels by Indigenous authors like Velma Wallis, Sherman Alexie, Ella Deloria, Deborah Miranda, James Welch and more, students will learn to consider the contexts from which Native American literatures emerge, and how the use of genre, language, and humor, work together to delight, challenge, and intrigue multiple audiences. With emphasis on the novel, but not limited to that form, course lectures, assignments, and discussions will be guided by Christopher Teuton's "Applying Oral Concepts to Written Traditions," and excerpts from other critical works, like Thomas King's The Truth About Stories. Students will also consider the significance of literature as a means for Indigenous authors to establish and maintain tribal peoples' relationships to their places and to each other.




Getting Into Grad School:
The Inside Scoop About What Works

GRDSCH 200: Preparing for Graduate Education

Summer 2014
This full-term course for sophomores, juniors and seniors who know they want to pursue, or are considering the possibility of, graduate education; learn first-hand from faculty and staff involved in graduate admissions how to find a good program fit and how to prepare effective application materials.

WHO SHOULD TAKE THIS COURSE?
 Are you unsure if you want to attend graduate school? Come explore and find out!
 Do you know for certain that you want to attend graduate school, but are not sure how to write a quality personal statement? We can help!
 Not sure what program or school you want to attend? Find your fit here!
The course seeks to engage students in determining the right “fit” for their individual graduate education goals through three primary objectives:
 Investigation: What is your desire to attend graduate school?
o What you need to know about the graduate school experience
 Revelation: What do graduate school admission committees actually expect?
o Demystify the process
o Personal statements, resumes/CVs and letters of recommendation
 Preparation: How does investigation and revelation lead to finding a “good fit” and how do you chart a course of action?
o Why do you want to go? When do you want to go? Where do you want to go? What do you want to do? How can you do it?

CREDITS: 2 C/NC
Mondays 1:10 – 3:20pm DEM 104 SLN: 14136

For more information or questions, contact Tylir McKenzie at tylirm@uw.edu or visit our website at http://www.grad.washington.edu/discover/preparing-for-grad-school.shtml
The Graduate School University of Washingto



Certificate in Localization: Language and Technology for the Global Market

Students participating in the two Summer Quarter courses will learn how to make web-based content and software available in another language – taking into consideration other cultural norms and geopolitical issues - and to acquire hands-on experience in translating webpages, software strings, user interfaces and help files, allowing target users to interact at every level in their local language. Courses are taught by Localization professionals with 10+ years of experience in the field.

Required Courses:

Introduction to Localization & Project Management, JSIS 473

Sören Eberhard & Jan Grodecki, 5 credits, A Term, M & Th, 5 - 9 PM, and Sat, July 12, 9 AM– 4 PM

Localization Technology and Tools, JSIS 474

Jan Grodecki & Pavel Soukenik, 5 credits, B Term, M & Th, 5 - 9 PM, and Sat, August 16, 9 AM– 4 PM

 

The program will greatly increase students’ chances to find entry-level localization or international project manager positions in the software industry. For more details on the program and the courses, visit https://catalyst.uw.edu/workspace/summerq/33805/229096.



LARCH 498D/598B: Chinese Landscapes and Urbanism (3 credits)

Summer B-Term 2014: July 24-Aug 22

MWF 10:20-12:30, JHN 022

Students from Landscape, Urban Design and Planning, Architecture, Art, International studies and other departments are all welcome. Please register by May 20, 2014.

This course will survey the history of Chinese landscapes, starting from the earliest imperial game reservation, scholar gardens in Suzhou, the imperial landscapes of Chang’an, Dadu, the Forbidden City and Summer Palace, to the contemporary rapid urbanization and its resulting social transformation. The economic, socio-cultural and political context and implications of urban landscapes will be discussed, such as vernacular traditional knowledge of fengshui, Daoist idea of energy or qi, the philosophy and aesthetics of wuwei, and current pursuit of development and modernization. The influence on early Japanese gardens and modern international practices of Chinese landscapes will also be explored.

Class sessions will include lectures and discussion. Students will gain knowledge of landscape architecture and especially the discipline’s development in China, an understanding of cultural influences in Chinese gardens and cities, and a perspective that examines urbanization and landscape practice in contemporary Chinese context.

Course Instructor: Jiawen Hu

Please contact instructor at jiawenhu@uw.edu for more information.




Seminar on Cross-Border Business Transactions
Between China & the US
B Econ 490 A (SLN: 14367)

Instructor: Norm Page, Partner at Davis, Wright, Tremaine LLP, & Chair of their China Practice
http://www.dwt.com/people/normanbpage/

Summer Term
Class Dates: 6/23 - 8/1/14; Final Exam: 8/5/14
Time: MW, 3:00-6:00 PM

Target Students
 Law Students (JD & LLM)
 Business Students (MBA & advanced undergraduates)
 Jackson School of International Studies (graduate & advanced undergraduates)

Seminar Highlights
 Provide a brief overview of historical events that continue to influence the Chinese government’s policies toward foreign investment from the end of the first Opium War in 1842 through the end of Mao era with the Third Plenum in 1978.
 Provide a brief overview of development of bi-lateral investment policies of US and PRC governments during the period of Deng Xiaoping’s “opening and reform” from 1978 through 2013.
 Review of China’s new economic reforms and third phase of China’s development and global integration, as reflected in PRC’s 2013 Third Plenum, the Framework Plan of the Shanghai Free Trade Zone and the negotiation of a US-China and EU-China Bilateral Investment Treaties.
 Discuss hypothetical case study of a Chinese solar energy company’s purchase of a US solar company showing:
o Chinese company’s policy and business objectives for entering US market;
o Relationship among policy, business and legal issues; and
o Lawyer’s and business client’s respective roles in analyzing transaction as it progresses and jointly resolving legal and business issues.
 Consider alternative methods to achieve business objectives in addition to purchasing, such as licensing, contract manufacturing, and distributorship contracts.
 Examine selected US corporation, contract, commercial, property and regulatory laws and business issues as they may arise in the course of the transaction.
 Analyze legal and business issues raised by selected provisions of a sample Stock Purchase Agreement.
 Introduce business and legal issues raised by use of financing in M&A transactions and “leveraged buyouts.”
 Introduce certain aspects of US and PRC commercial law relevant to on-going financing of acquired company, e.g., cross-border inventory finance and lease receivable finance and securitization.

Questions? Email the Foster School Finance department at finance@uw.edu


A Unique Learning Opportunity in Summer Quarter:

A Cross-Disciplinary Approach to Justice

Please encourage students to enroll in a unique summer quarter learning opportunity to take one of four allied courses (COM 330, DESIGN 300, DRAMA 303, and PHIL 307).  As an undergraduate learning initiative in the College of Arts & Sciences, this Summer Institute provides opportunities for students to develop and apply a variety of liberal learning skills through integrated cross-disciplinary methods.  These courses have no prerequisites and are open to students in all majors.  The courses will meet separately on Mondays and Wednesdays and together for Friday workshops in which students from each of the four courses will work in teams to develop final presentations on some aspect of justice.  The team presentations will take place at a conference on Justice Across Boundaries to be held on Saturday, Aug. 9.  The conference on Aug. 9 will be the last meeting for each class.  Students who are interested in participating should sign up for one of the four allied courses:

COM 330.  Rhetoric of Science (Professor Leah Ceccarelli)

MW 1:10 – 3:20 in CMU 228 and F 12:00 – 2:20 in OUGL 136

Studying how scientists use rhetoric to communicate, and how nonscientists use rhetoric to argue about science and its effects, you will discover the means of persuasion available to shape science, its products, and the relationship between both and the publics that surround them. 

DESIGN 300. Design + Thinking (Professor Christopher Ozubko)

MW 9:40 – 11:50 in ART 247 and F 12:00 – 2:20 in OUGL 136

In this course you will explore conceptual problem-solving employing some of the fundamental principles of visual communication.  Collaboratively solving problems in visual design will also help you to develop your critical, analytical, and verbal skills.

Drama 303: The Structure of Dramatic Narrative (Professor Andrew Tsao)

MW 9:40 – 11:50 in HUT 154 and F 12:00 – 2:20 in OUGL 136

This course will explore the various forms the narrative impulse has taken particularly in western civilization in order to enable you to better employ these forms as practitioners in order to convey meaning.  Since all stories are signs of something else or metaphorical in nature, the uses of storytelling can suggest or imply themes, ideas, concepts, morality, ethics, behavior, devotion and persuasion.

PHIL 307:  Justice Across Disciplinary Boundaries (Professor William Talbott)

MW 1:10 – 3:20 in SAV 264 and F 12:00 – 2:20 in OUGL 136

The course will integrate work in psychology, sociology, anthropology, law, economics, and relevant research in the natural and biological sciences with work in philosophy, political theory, and communication to explore how these various disciplines contribute to our understanding of justice.


DRAMA 494 SLN 11094 M-F, 1:10-3:10 Summer 2014 Term A 

Four weeks, four genres: the histories, tragedies, comedies, and romances of William Shakespeare, their context, their quarrels, their legacies.

The  course is designed to expose readers of Shakespeare to the traditions of staging Shakespeare, to explore how productions have historically embraced, promoted and challenged this supreme writer, to introduce this complex writer to artist of the theater and to make these texts accessible for the daunted. 

George Kenneth Morell

Academic Counselor

School of Drama

129 Hutchinson Hall

Box 35390

206.543.4204   

gkmorell@uw.edu   drama.uw.edu  




BIOL 100 (a 5-credit course) for the first time as an online course this summer. Students unable to attend the classroom-based BIOL 100 course during summer quarter are now able to learn basic biological principles and their applications remotely. Please note that students will need to purchase their own lab supplies, including a sheep brain. Estimated cost for supplies is $30.

For more details on the course, visit https://sdb.admin.washington.edu/timeschd/uwnetid/sln.asp?QTRYR=SUM+2014&SLN=14317.





Courses in our ESRM curriculum this Summer

All of these courses have field trips or are offered in the field, which is a wonderful way to enjoy learning in the summer!  These special offerings are only open to majors during the year, so this is the chance to get them, and get some NW credit too.

ESRM 201 (5) Sustaining Pacific Northwest Ecosystems, A Term, I&S/NW, SLN 11438
ESRM 210 (5) Introductory Soils, A Term, NW, SLN 11439
ESRM 304 (5) Environmental and Resource Assessment, NW/QSR, SLN 14240





“Marketing and Management From a Sustainability* Perspective” course? ESRM 320 is an introductory business course designed for non-business majors, has NO prerequisites, and gives NW and I&S credit.

ESRM 320

SLN 11442

TU/TH 4:30-6:50 PM

ABOUT 320...

For-profit companies and non-profit organizations use marketing and human resources to create and deliver products, services, and ideas. This course explores: 1) business practices that are aligned with environmental stewardship and social responsibility standards; 2) the concepts and models of a market orientation; 3) how markets are researched and targeted, and products positioned, to meet consumer needs; 4) creating and pricing products, developing distribution channels, and implementing promotion campaigns; 5) managerial and leadership skills and styles; 6) how companies motivate employees and develop human capital; and 7) methods for recruiting, selecting, training, and evaluating employees.

 

* What does sustainability mean, and how is it manifested in business?

Various definitions of sustainability have been used, but all share a common understanding that sustainability refers to integrating environmental, social responsibility, and financial/economic elements in order to meet the needs of people today without compromising Earth’s capacity to provide for future generations. Said another way, practicing sustainability involves balancing the three Ps: planet, people, and profits.

 

Thank you.

Dorothy Paun, PhD, MBA
University of Washington
396 Bloedel Hall, Box 352100
Seattle, WA 98195 USA
001.206.685.9467
https://courses.washington.edu/sustains/ (non-university people)
https://catalysttools.washington.edu/workspace/dap/13943/ (for people with a UW ID)



ESRM 321 is an introductory business course designed for non-business majors, has NO prerequisites, and gives NW and I&S credit.

ESRM 321

SLN 11443, 5 credits

TU/TH 4:30-6:50 PM

ESRM 321 explores sustainable business through the lens of finance and accounting and offers an opportunity to learn about the connections between businesses, society, and the environment. This course first lays a foundation by reviewing basic finance and accounting concepts and models, followed by discussions/exercises relating to the stock market and investing; money and counterfeiting deterrence; financial institutions and the US Federal Reserve Board; and financial statements. Students will learn a tool for assessing corporate environmental, social responsibility, and financial performance and explore relationships among these three dimensions of sustainability’s triple bottom line.

* Various definitions of sustainability have been used, but all share a common understanding that sustainability refers to integrating environmental, social responsibility, and financial/economic elements in order to meet the needs of people today without compromising Earth’s capacity to provide for future generations.

Thank you.

Dorothy Paun, PhD, MBA
University of Washington
396 Bloedel Hall, Box 352100
Seattle, WA 98195 USA
001.206.685.9467
https://courses.washington.edu/sustains/ (non-university people)
https://catalysttools.washington.edu/workspace/dap/13943/ (for people with a UW ID)


 

Register for Summer 2014 online courses

Register now for summer quarter online classes. Enjoy the convenience and flexibility of the University of Washington's online courses. As a UW matriculated student, this summer you can take some of the most popular online credit classes as part of your normal tuition load and pay an online fee of only $350 per class. These select online courses are offered in a group-start format, which means you can interact with your classmates and complete the course during the quarter. Online courses help meet graduation requirements and allow you access to the university when you need it. Check out the summer quarter 2014 time schedule. Simply register as you would for any other class using MyUWOnline courses are housed at the UW Seattle campus. UW Bothell and UW Tacoma students should check with advising staff at their home campuses before enrolling in classes they expect to count towards their degree program. These courses do not count as residence credit; consult with your adviser if you have any questions.

The following courses feature the $350 fee and the group-start format:

COM 420/JSIS 419/POL S 468: Comparative Media Systems (I&S)


DANCE 100: Understanding Dance (VLPA)

DANCE 101: Dance and the American Experience (VLPA)

DRAMA 103:Theatre Appreciation (VLPA)

ESRM 100: Introduction to Environmental Science (I&S/NW)

LING 200: Introduction to Linguistic Thought (I&S/VLPA/QSR)

MUSIC 162: American Popular Song (VLPA)

PHIL 115:  Practical Reasoning (I&S/QSR)

PHIL 343:  Ethics and the Environment (I&S)

POL S 321: American Foreign Policy (I&S)

STAT 311: Elements of Statistical Methods (NW/QSR)


Inline image 1


Autumn 2014 Seminars

 

Autumn 2014 Inner Pipeline Seminars

EDUC 401, specific sections and SLNs linked below.
CREDITS: 1-5. Seminars are Credit/No Credit.

The following seminars will be offered during Autumn Quarter 2014:

Mondays:

·         Education in the Criminal Justice System (EDUC 401G) 

·         Higher Education Tutoring and Mentorship (EDUC 401 L&M) 

·         Learning for Life, Not for Labor or Grades (EDUC 401R)

Tuesdays:

·         Education For Sustainability (EDUC 401N)

·         General Issues in K-12 Education (EDUC 401A) 

·         SteAm Team (EDUC 401H)

Wednesdays:

·         FIG General Issues in K-12 (EDUC 401K)

·         Strengths Based Education: Serving the Underserved (EDUC 401J)

Thursdays:

·         Cultural Conversations: International and Domestic Student Collaboration at the University (401I) 

·         Math and Science in K-12 Education (EDUC 401E) 

·         Social Justice In Education (EDUC 401B)

·         Teaching English Language Learners (EDUC 401C) 

Fridays:

·         Indigenous Food Revitalization in the Public School Classroom (EDUC 401Q) 

Online Opportunity:

·         Online Learning Community:  Current Topics in K-12 Education (EDUC 401D) 

For these seminars, the number of credits a student receives depends on the number of tutoring hours completed in addition to seminar attendance. Credit and tutoring requirements are as follows:

·         1 credit: 2.5 hours tutoring/week (at least 20 hours tutoring/quarter)*

·         2 credits: 2.5 hours tutoring/week (at least 20 hours tutoring/quarter)

·         3 credits: 5 hours tutoring/week (at least 40 hours tutoring/quarter)

·         4 credits: 7.5 hours tutoring/week (at least 60 hours tutoring/quarter)

·         5 credits: 10 hours tutoring/week (at least 80 hours tutoring/quarter)

*A student may opt to register for 1 credit if it means avoiding an additional registration fee. Students may also register for more than 5 credits.

 

Details and descriptions for each seminar may be found on our website:  

http://expd.washington.edu/pipeline/inner/autumn-2014-inner-pipeline-seminars.html      

All students should attend a mandatory Pipeline orientation prior to the first class session. You may sign-up and rsvp at:

https://expo.uw.edu/expo/login

Please contact us at pipeline@uw.edu with additional questions. We look forward to working with you.


Course Title:  Power, Privilege and Preservation

Quarter Offered:  Autumn 2014

Time and Day:  1:30-3:20pm, T/Th

Instructor:  Kristi Straus

Credits:  5

Course Fee:  None

Description:  In ENVIR 460 we are going to explore the ways that power plays a role in natural resource management.  Protected areas such as parks, wildlife preserves and marine protected areas are a key part of the global strategy to conserve biodiversity and protect resources--and these protected areas generate controversy when local communities are excluded from living in, using, and managing the spaces designated for protection.  

We will examine ways that cultures with different power structures have protected their resources as well as examining strategies developed by resource managers to better integrate local communities in protected areas management. 

We will use examples of resource management and protected areas in Africa, Latin America, Asia, and the United States and examine the factors that contribute to the success or failure of these cases. Who decides what is worthy of preservation? Who decides who participates in management?


Innovation in Cleantech + Market Opportunity = Solutions for the Planet

UW ENVIRONMENTAL INNOVATION PRACTICUM (2 credits)

ENTRE 443/543, ENGR 498, ENVIR 495

Fall Quarter, Tuesdays 4-5:50 pm, Paccar Hall 292

Instructor:  Deb Hagen-Lukens dlhagen@uw.edu

Prerequisites:  None. Recommended for juniors and above, including grad students.

For a list of speakers and topics, check back in September: eic.washington.edu

 

The goal is to discover the universe of cleantech solutions to our most pressing environmental challenges and to raise awareness of how you might be part of that solution.  You’ll form teams around problems you identify, and present your solutions to the class.  Although not required, teams are invited to compete in the UW Environmental Innovation Challenge April 2, 2015.

The seminar consists of a selection of required readings and a series of industry experts who will speak on a specific cleantech topic. You will work in teams to present a proposed solution to an environmental problem. The final deliverable for the class is a 5-10 minute presentation.

Course topics will include:

·         Environmental challenges and opportunities linked to cleantech.

·         How to translate an idea into an actual device/product/company 

·         Market assessment (who would be the customer for this product or service?)

Questions?  ptufts@uw.edu


Introduction to Food and the Environment

C ENV 110 (5)

Meets both Natural World and Individuals and Societies Requirements

(I&S/NW)

SLN# 11809

No prerequisites. Great for Freshmen!

 

Everyone eats, and all food production has environmental consequences.

·         Discover environmental science through food production.

·         Explore the link between the decline of civilizations and current farmer efforts to cope with changing water supply, topsoil loss, and technology.

·         Create a food diary and find out the environmental consequences of your diet.

·         Understand what climate change, politics, culture, biodiversity, and geography have to do with food.

 

See: http://depts.washington.edu/coenv/food/study/courses#cenv

 


Linguistics 242: Introduction to Meaning - Swearing and Taboo Language

This 5-credit course investigates swear words and taboo
language. Discussions will cover the linguistic, pragmatic,
neurological, psychological, and social aspects of swearing.
Topics include how the brain processes swear words, crosscultural
differences surrounding taboo language, and the role
of obscenity in censorship and federal indecency laws.

(This course has no prerequisites. Counts as VLPA credit.)


Offered: MW 10:30-12:20p (Fall 2014)
Instructor: Laura McGarrity, Lecturer (lauramcg@uw.edu)

 


 

Yakama Nation Autumn 2014
Field Trip
SEFS 521D (2 credits)
October 2 & 3 (All day
Thurs & Friday)
15 student limit


For students in biology, engineering,
environmental anthropology, ecology,
restoration ecology, stewardship of cultural
and natural resources, we will spend almost
two days with t r i bal members of the
Yakama Nation learning about their historical,
current, and future ways of managing their
1.2 million acre reservation (as well as their
commitments and r i ghts to the 10 million
acres of ceded treaty lands). This will be
an opportunity to learn about a critical and
unique approach to land stewardship spanning
from 200 to 3742 meters!
Course Fee for travel & food.
Advising/registration assistance:
SEFS: sefsadv@uw.edu


Instructors:
(1) Ernesto Alvarado (Ernesto@uw.edu)
(2) Tom Hinckley (hinckley@uw.edu)

 


 

No Prerequisite
JSIS C 201
Introduction to World Religions: Western Traditions
TTh 1:30-3:20

Wellman

No Prerequisite
JSIS C 322
The Gospels and Jesus of Nazareth

MW 9:30-11:20
Williams

JSIS C 408
The World of the Early Church
MW 2:30-4:20
Williams
Early Christian church within the context of the Greco-Roman sociopolitical, philosophical, and religious environment. Covers the period from about AD 100 to 300. Christian thinkers and documents studied include both the classical "orthodox" and the "heretical." Recommended: either HIST 307, JSIS C 220, or JSIS C 328.

JSIS C 490/590
Religion in Japan
TTh  3:30-520
Tokuno

Permission of instructor or admission to MAIS program
JSIS C 501
Approaches to the Study of Religion
M 11:30-2:30

Wellman

JSIS C 598 C
Graduate Colloquium
Tokuno

JSIS ?? unconfirmed
Graduate course: History and Politics of Yoga
Th 11:30-2:20
??Novetzke

Program Coordinator for Comparative Religion,
EU Center & Hellenic Studies
Jackson School of International Studies
University of Washington
Box 353650
Seattle, WA 98195
206.543-4835 M-Th mornings

Register now for autumn quarter online classes. Enjoy the convenience and flexibility of the University of Washington's online courses. As a UW matriculated student, this autumn you can take some of the most popular online credit classes as part of your normal tuition load and pay an online fee of only $350 per class. These select online courses are offered in a group-start format, which means you can interact with your classmates and complete the course during the quarter. Online courses help meet graduation requirements and allow you access to the university when you need it. Check out the autumn quarter 2014 time schedule. Simply register as you would for any other class using MyUWOnline courses are housed at the UW Seattle campus. UW Bothell and UW Tacoma students should check with advising staff at their home campuses before enrolling in classes they expect to count towards their degree program. These courses do not count as residence credit; consult with your adviser if you have any questions.

The following courses feature the $350 fee and the group-start format:

ASTR 101: Astronomy (NW,QSR)

COM 340: History of Mass Communication (I&S)
COM 440/POL S 461: Mass Media Law (I&S)

COM/AES/GWSS 389: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in the Media (I&S)*
DANCE 100: Understanding Dance (VLPA)

DANCE 101: Dance and the American Experience (VLPA)

DRAMA 103:Theatre Appreciation (VLPA)

ESRM 100: Introduction to Environmental Science (I&S/NW)

GEOG 102: World Regions (I&S)
LING 200: Introduction to Linguistic Thought (I&S/VLPA/QSR)

MATH 124: Calculus with Analytic Geometry I (NW/QSR)

MATH 125: Calculus with Analytic Geometry II (NW)

MATH 126: Calculus with Analytic Geometry III (NW)

MUSIC 120: Survey of Music (VLPA)

MUSIC 162: American Popular Song (VLPA)

MUSIC 185: The Concert Season (VLPA)

MUSIC 331: History of Jazz (VLPA)

PHIL 115: Practical Reasoning (I&S/QSR)

POL S 270: Introduction to Political Economy (I&S)

PSYCH 101: Introduction to Psychology (I&S)

PSYCH 203: Personality and Individual Differences (I&S)

PSYCH 206: Human Development (I&S)
STAT 311: Elements of Statistical Methods (NW/QSR)



HSERV 523: Advanced Health Services Research Methods I: Large Public Databases; Big Data

Instructor: Dr. Ruth Etzioni

4 Credits

Tuesdays/Thursdays 3:30-5:20pm

University of Washington Seattle campus, HSI I132

HSERV 523 covers the economic foundations of binary and multinomial choice models, modeling of utilization and cost data, and the analysis of survey data. Introduces the new big data of health services research, health claims, and survey databases. Discusses the promises and pitfalls of the data and models for analyzing the correlates of health care costs and utilization.

Prerequisite: either HSERV 511, BIOST 511/BIOST 512/BIOST 513, BIOST 517/BIOST 518, or EPI 511/EPI 512, and permission of instructor.

Students will gain an understanding of how to:

-          Develop a conceptual or theoretical model to analyze a health services research problem relating to utilization or cost of health services.

-          Describe the assumptions of the statistical methods covered in the course and the conditions in which they are appropriately applied.

-          Conduct statistical analyses relevant for observational studies based on administrative databases or surveys and interpret the analyses appropriately.

-          Write reports describing the analyses with accompanying graphics and tables

-          Critique the methods used in published research papers.

 

Questions? Contact Professor Ruth Etzioni: retzioni@fhcrc.org

 

To register, visit UW Seattle Time Schedule: https://www.washington.edu/students/timeschd/AUT2014/hlthsvcs.html, SLN# 15622

 

If you decide to register for this course, please register ASAP during Spring quarter, to help ensure sufficient enrollment for the course to have a TA position in the Fall.