100-Level EWP Course Basics

Students currently enrolled or interested in enrolling in 100-level EWP, can find basic course information here, such as:

      The EWP Outcomes
      Overview of 100-Level Courses
      Required and Suggested Textbooks
      Current Instructors and Sections
      The English Department's Undergraduate Advising

The EWP Outcomes

As gateways to academic reading, research, and writing at the University of Washington, all Expository Writing Program courses are designed around a set of shared learning outcomes. These outcomes articulate the need for students to develop and practice the skills and habits that are foundational to academic writing and to recognize how to adapt these skills and habits for the varied demands of university-wide writing that students will encounter.


An Overview of 100-Level Courses

All of the following courses fulfill the University of Washington's five-credit English Composition requirement.

English 131, Composition: Exposition


The most popular EWP offering, in this writing course students work closely with their peers and instructor to develop a portfolio of writing that reflects an ability to write papers with complex claims that matter in academic contexts. The readings in this class focus on academic discourse from a variety of disciplines.

English 111, Composition: Literature


In this writing course students work closely with their peers and instructor to develop a portfolio of writing that reflects an ability to write papers with complex claims that matter in academic contexts. The readings in this class focus on both literary texts and scholarship about literature.

English 121, Composition: Social Issues


In this writing course students work closely with their peers and instructor to develop a portfolio of writing that reflects an ability to write papers with complex claims that matter in academic and non-academic contexts. The course focuses on a particular social issue, the study of which is enhanced by direct service activities in the Seattle community. Students combine readings, course work, and direct service to write well-documented, evidence-based argumentative papers. Previous sections of this course have enabled students to conduct their service activiteis in the Seattle Public Schools, local women's centers, homeless shelters and soup kitches, AIDS organizations, and arts programs.

English 109/110: Introductory Composition


In this two-quarter writing course students work closely with their peers and instructor to develop portfolios of work that reflect an ability to write papers with complex claims that matter in academic and nonacademic contexts. English 109/110 is a stretch model of English 131; the same skills are taught over a longer period, providing students with more time and resources to acquire reading, researching, and writing skills needed to compose in academic settings.

The course is designed for students who are first generation college students and/or whose educational background has not prepared them for academic culture. Such students may be marginalized on the basis of economic, educational, or racial background and are placed into English 109/110 by the Educational Opportunity Program, The Office of Minority Affairs & Diversity, or Student Athletic Academic Services.

Computer Integrated Courses


Many of the above courses are offered in Computer Integrated Course environments. To find out more about CIC offerings and resources, click here.

Composition Courses through UW in the High School


In cooperation with UW Educational Outreach and the UW in the High School (UWHS) program, the EWP offers UW English courses in high schools throughout Washington State. In the 2012-13 school year, 28 high schools offered UW English 131 and English 111, and the high school students in those courses can earn UW credit. Courses are taught by EWP-trained, long-term, well-qualified high school teachers. To find out more about UWHS, visit the program, click here.


Required and Suggested Textbooks

The required and suggested readings for 100-level EWP courses vary by section. Check with individual instructors to find out which texts are required.

Acts of Inquiry


Acts of Inquiry: A Guide to Reading, Research, and Writing at the University of Washington is designed to support students in meeting the learning outcomes set by the University of Washington's Expository Writing Program for its composition courses. Whether students are new to the university or more experienced, this book provides guidance and strategies that will help them succeed as writers at the University of Washington as well as in future contexts of inquiry. Acts of Inquiry is required in all 100-level EWP courses; new and used copies, with or without readings, are available at the University Bookstores.

The Everyday Writer


The Everyday Writer is a handbook and web resource useful for students learning about research, documentation, and academic writing. The Everyday Writer is recommended in all 100-level EWP courses; new and used copies are available at the University Bookstores.

The UW Common Book


The University of Washington's Common Book, distributed to incoming freshmen at summer orientation, is designed to engage the UW's academic community in shared reading of a text treating contemporary societal issues. Some 100-level EWP sections, espeically those in Autumn Quarter, may require or recommend students read the Common Book. For mor information about the program, click here.


Current Instructors and Sections

Contact information for current EWP instructors can be found through the English Department's online directory. To find out more about current l00-level course offerings, visit the UW Time Schedule.


The English Department's Undergraduate Advising

To learn more about other courses in the English Department, please visit Undergraduate Advising .

UW English EWP Program
maintained by Lilly Campbell
last tweak 10.2013
site revamped 9.2011

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