Autumn Quarter 2001
 English Graduate Studies  | University of Washington Graduate School English Department 
 
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501

Shakespeare's Earlier vs. Later Contemporaries in Verse & Drama

Fisher

TTh 1:30-3:20

This course assumes prior experience of some kind with Shakespeare, but little, if any, with the other authors active during his lifetime, whose output was impressive enough to have been called a "Renaissance." Shakespeare wrote primarily for the stage, but at a time when playwrights could call themselves "poets" and imagine themselves forming a "culture" through their writing that might rival the culture of the past, to which most of their formal schooling was devoted. This course will therefore take up cultural issues as well as paying close attention to its texts--though I shall have to confess that my own approach to these issues is not "presentist," which is to say that I prefer attempting to understand them in their own terms (as much as one can), over measuring them upon a grid of concerns that have arisen later. Ideas of what this 'culture' ought to be, and what it could do, undergo considerable change from the late 1580's to the early 1620's, and we shall explore some of these changes as well. Verse contemporaries include Sidney, Marlowe, Chapman, Davies, and Donne. Fellow dramatists include Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, and Middleton. Critical theory of the time is provided by Sidney and Daniel, with epigrammatical sound bites from Jonson and others.

503

19th Century England

Butwin

MW 1:30-3:20

This course is meant to do two things: introduce 19th century England to people who haven't done much work in the field and initiate those who know the field into the mysterious art of teaching it. Teaching may or may not be the best way to learn a field, but it is certainly what most of us expect to be doing with it for a number of years. We will study the mercurial career of industry and empire, of urban and rural life, of war and peace in the 19th century-always with an eye to its presentation to American undergraduates sometime after the turn of the 21st century. A glance at the reading list will indicate two more details: I extend the 19th century to the period of World War I when retrospection will tell us a lot about the past century, and we are circumventing the Norton Anthology, its expense and its sheer weight.This course is meant to do two things: introduce 19th century England to people who haven't done much work in the field and initiate those who know the field into the mysterious art of teaching it. Teaching may or may not be the best way to learn a field, but it is certainly what most of us expect to be doing with it for a number of years. We will study the mercurial career of industry and empire, of urban and rural life, of war and peace in the 19th century-always with an eye to its presentation to American undergraduates sometime after the turn of the 21st century. A glance at the reading list will indicate two more details: I extend the 19th century to the period of World War I when retrospection will tell us a lot about the past century, and we are circumventing the Norton Anthology, its expense and its sheer weight.

Texts:
Frankenstein.Mary Shelley. Dover ISBN 0-486-28211-2
English Romantic Poetry. Dover Publications ISBN O-486-29282
English Victorian Poetry. Dover. ISBN 0-486-29282-7
Hard Times. Charles Dickens. Penguin Classics ISBN 0 14 04.3398 8
Heart of Darkness. Joseph Conrad. Dover ISBN 0-486-26464-5
Heartbreak House. G B Shaw Dover ISBN O-486-29291-6
And a course packet of Mill, Carlyle & Co.

507

Literary Criticism: Classical (w/ CLit 507)

Searle

MW 1:30-3:20

Course description not available at this time.

512

Introductory Reading in Old English

Stevick

Daily 9:30

This is a beginning course in the earliest written form of the English language, indispensable for study of literary (and other) texts in Old English, extremely helpful for study of English texts of the entire middle ages, and fundamental to historical study of the English language.

517

Pre-Shakespearean Drama

Coldewey

MW 3:30-5:20

In this seminar we will examine some varieties of the English drama written before and leading up to Shakespeare, including the Chester Cycle, a number of Non-cycle plays, morality plays, interludes and other humanist compositions. We will examine too some ways of approaching these plays: as cultural markers, as expressions of civic identity, as spectacular performative ventures, and as both parents and children of their own eras.

518

Shakespeare: History, Tragedy & The Future of Illusion

Blau

MW 3:30-5:20

Since Brechtian alienation, deconstruction, and the advent of the New Historicism, the status of tragic drama has been, if not utterly discredited, certainly looked at askance. It is to this critique that the subtitle of the seminar refers: not the histories and the tragedies, but the relation of history and tragedy, or, so far as we can discern it, the formation of history in the tragic drama of Shakespeare. What we shall be concerned with, then, is the idea of history as it contends through various plays, from Titus Andronicus to King Lear, with the distressing powers of tragic vision, which may take the measure of any critique, or for that matter any historicism.
As we reassess, too, what is now the dominant scholarship on Shakespeare, the issue at stake will be: is tragedy disempowering, or in its fatalistic way a reaffirmation of or testament to established power? And what seems unavoidable in Shakespeare: is there anything to be extracted, even if tragic vision is a delusion or delinquency, "from whatever element it may contain of poetry within history"?--to adapt Baudelaire's remark about the nature of modernity. Which will raise various unresolved issues-amidst the historical materialism now determining cultural studies--about the residual powers of poetry and, transhistorically, the status of the aesthetic, as well as, inevitably, in an age of demystification, the future of illusion.
Requirements: a seminar presentation (written abstract to be submitted) and a prepared response to someone else's presentation; also, with an earlier written proposal, a final critical paper. Other than that, with clear evidence of the reading done, participation should be a reflex.

533

Literature and Politics: Melville, Douglass, Lincoln

Shulman

MW 1:30-3:20

We'll ground our reading of Melville's Moby-Dick and The Piazza Tales in the history and politics of the 1840s and 1850s, especially the politics of race and slavery, the discourse of savagery and civilization, of Manifest Destiny and an emerging capitalism, and of the authoritarian tendencies Melville sees endangering American democracy. We'll then turn to Lincoln and to Douglass's Narrative (1845) and his My Bondage and My Freedom (1855) to deepen our understanding of the reciprocal relation between literature and politics in the period culminating in the Civil War.

535

The Problem of the Modern Woman in American Culture

Simpson

TTh 1:30-3:20

Course description not available at this time.

546

Woolf and Lawrence

Kaplan

TTh 11:30-1:20

Course description not available at this time.

551

Collage and Modern American Poetry

Reed

MW 11:30-1:20

Although originating in the visual arts, collage-the juxtaposition or combination of objects removed from their customary contexts--has also appealed to a wide range of American poets wishing to challenge received notions about the boundaries between "art" and "life." We will be concentrating on four moments in the history of American poetry in which collage features prominently: the modernist "shoring of fragments" (Eliot, Pound); the 1930s critique of media doublespeak (Fearing, Reznikoff, Rukeyser); the 1950s and the contemporary fascination with long compilations of found materials (Cha, Goldsmith). In parallel with the poetry, we will also be reading selected pieces by relevant thinkers, such as Baudrillard, Benjamin, Debord, and Vaneigem.

560

The Nature of Language

Curzan

TTh 11:30-1:20

In academia, we traffic in language-reading, writing, and talking in order to transmit knowledge. In fact, Robin Lakoff goes so far as to argue that the university's only acts are speech acts. And yet we rarely step back to analyze the nature of the language in which we work. In this course, we will examine both the structure and use of language-focusing particularly on English-and in the process, we will try to unravel the relationship of language, thought, and identity (personal, social, and political). As we describe the system of language and our manipulation of it (from sound to syntax to semantics, from pragmatics to politics, from community dialects to individual speech acts), we will consider various theoretical approaches for conceptualizing language, including structuralist, functionalist, generativist, and sociolinguistic models. This course will also focus on your refining (and defining) the research and writing skills valued in the profession of academia. No background in linguistics is required.

567A/B/C

Approaches to Teaching Composition

Stygall / Bawarshi / Dillon

TTh 3:30-5:20

This seminar serves as both an introduction to the field of rhetoric and composition as well as a continuation of the orientation for new Teaching Assistants. The course begins with an overview of the field and turns initially to readings and discussions about practices in the writing classroom. From there we will move into more theoretical (but still pedagogically oriented) discussion of rhetorical theory, rhetorical history, genre theory, and multicultural approaches. We will also spend some time reading and discussing materials on Standard English and non-prescriptive approaches to teaching grammar from a rhetorical perspective. Assignments will include at least six brief response papers, a mid-term analysis of a personal teaching artifact, and a final seminar paper in which an empirical analysis of writing is the central focus.

570

Practicum in TESL

Silberstein

ARR

English 570 is a credit/no credit course in which students sharpen their understanding of the technical, interpersonal, and practical elements involved in effective ESL teaching through regular observations of ESL classes, daily ESL teaching or assistance and observation in an ESL classroom, and seminar discussion of issues and problems related to ESL teaching. No required texts. Only open to MAT(ESL) students.

571

Theory & Practice in TESL

Wennerstrom

TTh 10:30-12:20

This course is an introduction to theory, research, and practical aspects of teaching English to speakers of other languages. The course provides an overview of major issues in second language acquisition, teaching methodology, and classroom practice, as well as closely related topics in linguistics, psychology, sociology, and education. Topics include: the relationship between first and second language acquisition; age as a factor in language learning; contrastive analysis, error analysis, and performance analysis; sociolinguistics and discourse analysis; affective variables; methodologies of language teaching; language policy; needs analysis and syllabus development; testing; and current theories of second language acquisition.

575

Pedagogical Grammar

MW 9:30-11:20

Course description not available at this time.

581

Creative Writer as Critical Reader

Kenney

TTh 11:30-1:20

Course description not available at this time.

584

Advanced Fiction Workshop

Johnson

MW 3:30-5:20

In this graduate workshop students will complete 3 short fictions, the first being 1000-words in length, the second and third being of regular length (10 to 25 pages). Once a week students will turn in a writing exercise (to be assigned by the professor) from John Gardner's The Art of Fiction, and once a week they will also turn in a plot outline for a new story. The workshop will be editing-intensive, by which I mean that as a group we will go over each other's stories line-by-line. No dimension of fiction, from character to story, from plot to language performance, from the title to the story's final metrical beats, will escape our scrutiny.
Other texts that we will use are Julie Checkoway's Creating Fiction and Northrop Frye's The Educated Imagination. Students can expect nearly a ream of writing-related handouts from the professor during the course of the term.

585

Advanced Poetry Workshop

McElroy

TTh 1:30-3:20

Poetry: Pattern and Pacing - a poetry workshop in which we will look at the musicality of poetic language, how it differs from and can be similar to prosaic patterns. How poets describe the process of writing a poem, from subject to final draft, and how we may use these suggestions to polish a poem in revision. Text: What Will Suffice (Christopher Buckley & Christopher Merrill, Gibbs Smith Publishers, 1995)

593

Textual Studies: Hypertest & Textual Theory (w/CLit 597A & Hum 523A)

Searle

MW 10:30-12:20

Course description not available at this time.

600B

Old Italian

Mussetter

MW 1:30-3:20

Readings in Old Italian, including Dante, Boccaccio, and Petrarch.


English Graduate Studies

Graduate Study in English at the University of Washington