Grad Fellows

Wind Energy
The Center for Environmental Politics seeks to play a leading role in training next generation scholars of environmental politics and governance. We welcome UW graduate students from any department to participate in the Center’s activities. To be designated as a Duck Family Graduate Fellow in Environmental Politics and Governance, students should submit a letter of interest along with a short (2 pages max) description of their research to envirpol AT uw.edu. CEP Duck Family Fellows will enjoy:

  • Invitations to all CEP-sponsored events, including talks and colloquia;
  • Invitations to join outside speakers for lunches and dinners;
  • Opportunities to participate in the annual Pacific NW Duck Family Graduate Workshop in Environmental Politics and Governance;
  • Opportunities to contribute to the organization of the Annual Richard B. Wesley Conference on Research Frontiers in Environmental Politics and Governance;
  • Opportunities to develop their academic networks by interacting with CEP faculty and outside visitors;
  • Access to resources for conference travel and research.

 


 

Graduate fellows, 2017-2018

Ellen Ahlness

Ellen Ahlness

PhD student
Department of Political Science

Ellen is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Political Science, with a background in Scandinavian studies. Her main area of research is the Arctic, with a strong interest in the way indigenous policy, environmental policy, and comparative state policy intertwine in this region. Her research focuses on the state indigenous policy among Arctic states and what motivates states to resist both indigenous land rights and attempts to join global organizations, such as the Arctic Council. This is of particular interest, given her wider interest in the link between indigenous land rights and environmental activism.

 
Email: eahlness AT u.washington.edu


Young Eun 'Alicia' Ahn

Young Eun ‘Alicia’ Ahn

PhD student
Evans School of Public Policy and Governance

Alicia is a Ph.D. student in the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance. Her main area of research is environmental policy, with a focus on the political economy of global environmental governance. Topics that excite her include measuring environmental stringency across countries, the varying effects of environmental policy instruments on business choices, and the spread of environmental policies to and among developing countries. A native of South Korea, Alicia has worked for the national trade and FDI promotion agency of Korea for several years prior to her doctoral studies. She has a B.A. in economics from Ewha Womans University (Seoul, Korea), and a MPA from Columbia University (New York, NY).

 
Email: yeahn AT u.washington.edu


Isabel Carrera

Isabel Carrera

PhD student
School of Environment and Forest Science

Isabel Carrera is a graduate student in the Environmental Studies Program at the UW School of Environment and Forest Science. She has a background in Biological Sciences and Science and Technology Studies. She is interested in the role that scientific information plays in society as well as the impact scientific information has on the design of natural resource management strategies. Her doctoral research project focuses on the approach of using natural capital as an instrument to calculate the productive base of ecosystem goods and services. She analyzes how this metric, or indicator system, and scientific knowledge more generally are incorporated into decision-making processes. In particular, she wants to understand the implications of this approach for community-based forest management projects, especially when managed by indigenous communities.

 
Email: micz AT u.washington.edu


Elizabeth Chrun

Elizabeth Chrun

Ph.D. candidate
Department of Political Science

Elizabeth Chrun is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Political Science, a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) Doctoral Fellow and a Comparative Law and Society Studies (CLASS) Fellow. Her research explores the issues of institutional failure and how new institutions can be established to mitigate them. Her dissertation looks at governance failure in the context of corruption in democracies. More specifically, she examines 1) the conditions under which anti-corruption agencies are established; 2) the contributing factors that explain their wide structural diversity and; 3) the conditions under which they are effective, employing both statistical and comparative case study methodologies. Her other projects look at institutional failure in the context of environmental problems and examine how new institutions such as information-based policies help to alleviate them, both domestically and internationally.

 
Email: echrun AT u.washington.edu


Kylie Clay

Kylie Clay

Ph.D. student
Department of Political Science

Kylie Clay is a doctoral student in the Department of Political Science. She studies comparative and international political economy, focusing on natural resource management and land use in developing countries. Her current research looks at the effects of agricultural productivity and land tenure on land use decision-making and deforestation in Sub-Saharan Africa. She holds a Master’s degree in Political Science and Political Economy from the London School of Economics and, prior to her studies at UW, worked as an economic consultant for the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO).

 
Email: kyclay AT u.washington.edu


Kate Crosman

Kate Crosman

Ph.D. student
Evans School of Public Policy and Governance

Kate Crosman is a PhD student in the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance. Her research is problem-focused, motivated by issues of marine common pool resource management, with a particular focus on cooperative and community-based approaches. Her theoretical base includes public policy, political science, collaborative management and common pool resource theories, and she seeks to apply an interdisciplinary frame to her work by integrating social and ecological systems and questions of power into a holistic analysis. Kate is a Trainee with the IGERT Program in Ocean Change; she holds a MSc in Natural Resources and Environment from the University of Michigan, and a BA in Political Science from Davidson College. Prior to graduate school Kate worked for many years, in many beautiful natural places, as a teacher and guide in the tourism services industry.

 
Email: katecros AT u.washington.edu


Daniel Feinberg

Daniel Feinberg

Ph.D. student
School of Environmental and Forest Sciences

Daniel Feinberg is a doctoral student in the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences at the University of Washington. Broadly, his research interests include urban ecology and the intersection of science and policy. More specifically, his current work aims to investigate determinants of hazard mitigation planning in the context of climate change in Washington State. Previously, Daniel earned an M.S. in Wildlife Ecology and Conservation from the University of Florida and a B.A. in Biology from Hamilton College. He also studied Environmental Science at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, MA and served as a Biological Aide with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Virginia Beach, VA.

 
Email: dsf6 AT u.washington.edu


Mathieu Dubeau

Mathieu Dubeau

Center for Environmental Politics Graduate Chair
Ph.D. student
Department of Political Science

Mathieu Dubeau is a PhD student in the Department of Political Science, and a graduate fellow at the Center for Environmental Politics. His primary research interests study the intersection of political ecology, political theory, and international relations as they relate to logics of capitalism. His previous work investigates the dual exploitation of labor and appropriation of non-human “nature” necessary for the creation of surplus-value. More recently, he has turned his gaze towards the increasing dependence of capitalism on the extraction of value from non-human sources. His dissertation seeks to further problematize these relationships of exploitation, and hopes to dislodge the dominate logic of possessive individualism that provides the ideological foundation and justification for capitalist extraction.

 
Email: mdubeau AT u.washington.edu


Will Gochberg

Will Gochberg

Ph.D. student
Department of Political Science

Will is a doctoral student in the Department of Political Science, and his primary interest is in the environmental politics of developing countries. His work has focused on local and state-level management of renewable resources. He holds a Master’s degree in political science from the University of British Columbia, where he researched illegal logging and REDD+ implementation. Will’s more recent work has looked at the conditions under which local user groups act collectively to manage forests sustainably. Prior to returning to school, Will was a mathematics teacher in Vermont as well as a volunteer teacher in Namibia through WorldTeach.

 
Email: gochberg AT u.washington.edu


Maria Gracia Gauto

Maria Gracia Gauto

MPA Candidate
Evans School of Public Policy and Governance

Maria Gracia is an MPA student from Asuncion, Paraguay at the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance. Her background ranges from conservation and environmental policy in Latin America and community development in Paraguay. She is interested in further deepening her knowledge on existing collaboration and success stories between Environmental Non-Profits and the private sector in Paraguay and how they could be replicated in Latin America. She intends to become a liaison in the region between the private sector and government institutions, in order to create policy platforms for innovation and incentivize better environmental practices in business. She received her BA in Political Science from Quinnipiac University in Connecticut and interned in the External Affairs Department at The Nature Conservancy HQ, the Americas Field Division at Conservation International HQ, and in the Risk Reduction and Adaptation, a local non-profit in Ecuador. She also worked for CSR in the Paraguayan private sector and at EducationUSA, a U.S. State Department Bureau of Education and Cultural Affairs program. She is currently the first year international student representative at the Evans Student Organization and is a Teacher Assistant in the University of Washington Political Science department.

 
Email: mariagracia.gauto AT gmail.com


Adam L. Hayes

Adam L. Hayes

PhD student
Evans School of Public Policy and Governance

Adam Hayes is a doctoral student in the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance. His research focuses on environmental and natural resource economics, environmental governance, and game theory. He is interested in the management of marine resources and the voluntary provision of public goods, particularly in the context of uncertainty and environmental change. Adam is a trainee with the IGERT Program on Ocean Change (iPOC) sponsored by the National Science Foundation. He holds a M.S. in Mineral and Energy Economics from the Colorado School of Mines and a B.A. in Economics, Political Science, and International Affairs from the University of Colorado Boulder. He previously worked for a data services firm in Colorado.

 
Email: alhayes AT u.washington.edu


Sarah Inman

Sarah Inman

Ph.D. student
Human Centered Design & Engineering

Sarah Inman is a doctoral student in the Human Centered Design and Engineering Program at the University of Washington. She has a background in Political Science and Science and Technology Studies. Her primary research interests include: 1) knowledge production and distribution through large-scale research; 2) individual and collective tensions when solving global problems such as climate change; 3) data science and visualization. For her master’s thesis, she conducted an ethnographic study of how citizens engaged with scientific data in the context of extractive industries. She also explored how citizens can use mobile air quality sensors to collect information about their environment. She is currently researching the challenges of drawing together heterogeneous Alaskan Salmon data from across diverse scientific and regulatory actors. She holds a Master of Arts from Georgetown University and is an aspiring mountain climber.

 
Email: sinman1 AT u.washington.edu


Steve Karceski

Steven Karceski

Ph.D. student
Department of Sociology

Steven is a doctoral student in the Sociology Department at the University of Washington. His research focuses on the political economy of environmental taxation, specifically how carbon tax policy is shaped by political institutions and societal beliefs. More generally, he is interested in political sociology, comparative historical sociology, and political economy. He earned a BA in Business and Economics from North Park University in Chicago. In the time between his undergraduate and graduate education he worked at the Chicago Board of Trade as an Options Clerk and Futures Trader, and later as an Investigator in the Regulatory Division at the Chicago Board Options Exchange.

 
Email: stevek7 AT u.washington.edu


Namrata Kolla

Namrata Kolla

MPA Candidate
Evans School of Public Policy and Governance

Namrata Kolla is a graduate student at the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance. Her focus is on the use of technology in the public sector, particularly ways that data and machine learning can help governments function more efficiently and become more transparent. Her current work explores how technology can improve the channels of communication between domain experts (e.g. environmental scientists), marginalized communities (e.g. climate refugees), and policymakers. Her Bachelor’s in Earth Sciences gives her a strong background in climate change modeling. She is also experienced in the nonprofit and public spaces. She worked in the Office of the President at The Nature Conservancy and on Capitol Hill researching natural gas and public health policies for a highly agricultural district.

 
Email: namkolla AT u.washington.edu


Alex Lenferna

Alex Lenferna

Ph.D. Student
Department of Philosophy

Georges Alexandre ‘Alex’ Lenferna is a Fulbright Scholar pursuing a PhD in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Washington (Seattle). His research specializes in the ethics of climate change or climate justice. His research attempts to take a philosophically grounded interdisciplinary approach to climate justice, poverty and inequality in a way which hopes to recognize and elucidate the intersections between climate change and other forms of justice. His research has examined a range of topics including climate justice and migration, geoengineering, carbon taxes, climate reparations, ethics and global poverty, and the rights of nature. His PhD thesis focuses on the moral, economic and political case for fossil fuel divestment. Alex is also engaged in a range of climate justice advocacy, including campaigns aimed at promoting fossil fuel divestment and carbon pricing.

 
Email: lenferna AT u.washington.edu


David Lucas

David Lucas

Ph.D. Student
Department of Political Science

David Lucas is a doctoral student in the department of political science studying political theory, international relations, and public law. His research interests include deliberative democratic theory, human rights, as well as theories of sustainability. He is particularly interested in the practice of deliberation and “truth seeking” as an alternative logic within international relations. He holds an M.A in Conflict Resolution and B.A in Philosophy from Portland State University, and has worked previously for various international organizations abroad.

 
Email: dclucas AT u.washington.edu


Megan McCloskey

Megan McCloskey

Ph.D. Student
School of Law

Megan McCloskey is pursuing Ph.D. in the School of Law studying the intersection of law, gender and development. She is particularly interested in the relationship between international discourses on sustainable development, international legal regulatory tools for monitoring and promoting compliance with human rights and sustainability norms, and practices of women’s empowerment at the state and firm level. Megan holds a B.A. from Fairfield University, M.A. in International Studies and LL.M. in Sustainable International Development Law from the University of Washington, and J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School.

 
Email: meganmc AT u.washington.edu


Tyler Nicholas

Tyler Nicholas

Ph.D. Student
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences
School of Public Health

Tyler Nicholas is a Ph.D. Student in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences studying Environmental Toxicology, which is the study of adverse responses to chemical, physical, or biological agents in human environments. He seeks to evaluate and translate the potential for risks posed by engineered nanomaterials. His proposed dissertation aims to determine if silver nanoparticle (AgNP) exposures pose a risk of triggering the dysbiosis-inflammation cycle, a novel mechanism relating lung microbiome dysbiosis to exacerbations of inflammatory lung diseases. He is interested in promoting chemical safety for exposed populations through policy recommendations for sustainable solutions to prevent AgNP inhalation exposures. Tyler holds a BS and MS in Environmental Health from the University of Rochester and the University of Washington School of Public Health, respectively.

 
Email: nicholat AT u.washington.edu


Christianna Parr

Christianna Parr

Ph.D. Student
Department of Political Science

Christianna is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Political Science and a steering committee member of the Equality Initiative in Political Science. Her main area of research is international relations and comparative politics, focusing on the region of South East Asia. She has a strong interest in the relationships civil society has with states and international organizations. Additional interests include the political strategies employed by environmental NGOs, ecofeminism, and human rights in Malaysia and Singapore. Her research focuses on the ascension efforts of NGOs in international organizations, and the types of NGOs that are given ascension status. She holds a B.A. in Political Science from the University of Washington and previously attended Taylor’s University in Malaysia.

 
Email: parr182 AT u.washington.edu


Judy Twedt

Judy Twedt

Ph.D. student
Department of Atmospheric Sciences

Judy Twedt is a Tacoma native and a doctoral student in the department of atmospheric sciences. She uses climate models to understand the connections between tropical oceans and the polar regions. She is also a founding member of the King County Labor Council Climate Caucus, where she co-leads a student-run speakers bureau on climate justice.

 
Email: jtwedt AT u.washington.edu


Nora Webb Williams

Nora Webb Williams

Ph.D. student
Department of Political Science

Nora Webb Williams is a PhD student in the Department of Political Science studying comparative politics, methods, and political economy. Her research addresses politics under authoritarian regimes, with a regional focus on the former Soviet Union. Specific research interests include: the political economy of oil and gas exploration, levels of involvement in anti-government protests, and judicial branch politics. She holds a dual Master’s degree in Central Eurasian Studies (MA) and Public Affairs (MPA) from Indiana University, Bloomington. Notable experiences outside of the university setting include serving as a Peace Corps volunteer in Kazakhstan (2006-2008) and Liberia (2009).

 
Email: nww3 AT u.washington.edu


Hanjie Wang

Hanjie Wang

Ph.D. student
Department of Political Science

Hanjie is a Ph.D. Student in the Department of Political Science. She studies international relations, focusing on international environmental politics and international law. Currently, her research interests include 1) global politics of renewable energy, the dynamic between energy transition and international political order; the issues of transnational environmental migrations, in particular international regulations and human rights; and 3) eco-feminism. She holds a Master’s degree in International Affairs from the Graduate Institute, Geneva (IHEID), and has worked for the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD).

 
Email: hjwang AT u.washington.edu


Dustin Welch García

Dustin Welch García

Ph.D. student
Jackson School of International Studies

Dustin Welch García is a PhD student in the Jackson School of International Studies. His experiences conducting off-grid solar projects in rural Peru have informed his research, which asks when and why NGO-led projects achieve sustainability in the provision of electricity. His work focuses on the analysis of energy policies and political environments, non-state/state interactions and community-level evaluations. By shedding light on the conditions that surround and influence the sustainable delivery of solar energy, his research hopes to contribute to the global conversation about how new models of infrastructure provision can simultaneously serve basic human needs while adjusting to a less carbon-dependent future.

 
Email: drw13 AT u.washington.edu