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Rachel L. Winer, PhD, MPH


Associate Professor, Epidemiology


Contact Information
Box 359933
HPV Research Group
908 Jefferson, Suite 1195
Seattle, WA 98104
Tel: 206-616-5081
Fax: 206-616-9788
rlw@u.washington.edu

University of Washington
Box 357236
Dept. of Epidemiology, School of Public Health
1959 NE Pacific St.
Health Sciences F-247B
Seattle, WA 98195
Tel: 206-616-6393
Fax: 206-543-8525


Research Interests
Dr. Winer's research interests are in the epidemiology and prevention of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and HPV-related cancers. Her current projects focus on the epidemiology and natural history of HPV infections in populations of young and mid-adult women and the use of self-collected vaginal specimens for HPV testing as an adjunct to cervical cancer screening, particularly in underscreened populations.

Teaching Interests
Dr. Winer currently co-teaches EPI 510 "Epidemiologic Data Analysis" during Winter Quarter and co-directs GH 560 "Principles of STD/HIV Research" during Summer Quarter.

Education
PhD, Epidemiology, University of Washington, SPH 2005
MPH, Epidemiology, University of Washington, SPH 2002

Selected Publications
Winer RL, Lee SK, Hughes JP, Adam DE, Kiviat NB, Koutsky LA. Genital human
papillomavirus infection: incidence and risk factors in a cohort of female
university students. Am J Epidemiol 2003; 157:218-26.

Winer RL, Kiviat NB, Hughes JP, Adam DE, Lee SK, Kuypers JM, Koutsky LA.
Development and duration of human papillomavirus lesions, after initial
infection. J Infect Dis 2005; 191:731-8.

Winer RL, Hughes JP, Feng Q, O'Reilly S, Kiviat NB, Holmes KK, Koutsky LA.
Condom use and the risk of genital human papillomavirus infection in young
women. N Engl J Med 2006; 354:2645-54.

Winer RL, Feng Q, Hughes JP, Yu M, Kiviat NB, O’Reilly S, Koutsky LA.
Concordance of self-collected and clinician-collected swab samples for detecting
HPV DNA in women 18-32 years of age. Sex Transm Dis 2007;34:371-7.

Winer RL, Xi LF, Hughes JP, Feng Q, Kiviat NB, Koutsky LA. Associations between quantitative HPV 16 and 18 DNA and RNA levels in incident infections and the subsequent risk of developing cervical lesions. J Med Virol 2009; 81:713-21.

Winer RL, Hughes JP, Feng Q, Kiviat NB, O'Reilly S, Koutsky LA. Comparison of incident cervical and vulvar/vaginal human papillomavirus infections in newly sexually active young women. J Infect Dis 2009; 199: 815-8.

Winer RL, Hughes JP, Feng Q, Xi LF, Cherne S, O'Reilly S, Kiviat NB, Koutsky LA. Detection of genital HPV types in fingertip samples from newly sexually active female university students.Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2010; 19: 1682-5.

Wolfrum SG, Koutsky LA, Hughes JP, Feng Q, Xi LF, Shen Z, WinerRL. Evaluation of dry and wet transport of at-home self-collected vaginal swabs for human papillomavirus testing. J Med Microbiol. 2012 Nov;61(Pt 11):1538-45.

WinerRL, Hughes JP, Feng Q, Xi LF, Lee SK, O'Reilly SF, Kiviat NB, Koutsky LA. Prevalence and risk factors for oncogenic human papillomavirus infections in high-risk mid-adult women. Sex Transm Dis. 2012 Nov;39(11):848-56.

More publications via PubMed

Links
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Last Reviewed on 3/12/2013

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