UW Bothell Learning Technologies Blog Rotating Header Image

[Uncategorized]

Google Drive Tips

Have you ever used Google Drive yet never quite understood its full potential? Learning Technologies recently published overviews of all the tools built into UW’s Google Drive. You can find them here; clicking the links to each key feature.

Want to know even more about Google Drive? PC Magazine has just the slideshow that explains 26 tips that makes collaboration in the classroom or workplace a tad bit easier. These tips include:

  • How to collaborate with others

  • How to seek out collaborators

  • How to edit like in Microsoft Word

  • Where to find add ons

  • And more

What tool in Google Drive do you use the most?

 

“Old Fashioned” Note Taking More Efficient than Computers

According to the Chronicle of Higher Education, students who take notes with a pen or pencil and paper is more likely to benefit in the classroom than those taking notes with their computers. The study will publish in Psychological Science titled “The Pen is Mightier than the Keyboard: Advantages of Longhand Over Laptop Note-taking.”

During the study, students received either a notebook and pen or a laptop (not connected to WiFi) to take notes then were tested on recalling facts and applying concepts. Those who did not use a computer earned higher scores on applying concepts than those who did. The fact recalling test had similar results.

Read More!

Gmail Played a Role in Changing Higher Ed

Gmail celebrated its 10th birthday on April 1st. Reflecting back, they altered higher education more than we know according to Inside Higher Ed.

Transitioning from enterprise platforms to consumer platforms, Gmail is helping the technological world retreat from centralized technology control with a slick, free platform that any higher ed institution can use. UW Bothell has already gone aboard to using Gmail and other Google apps.

This transition is especially great for students who prefer to utilize their own technology at school. Remember only 10 years ago when schools rolled out carts of uniform laptops loaded with the same software? Now students have the option to stop relying on Outlook or Microsoft Office and use the wonders of Gmail, Google Drive, and other online applications. Because of these programs, schools no longer need to worry as much about mandatory software and their updates.

Read More!

MOOCs Have the Potential to Change How Instructors Handle Classrooms

According to an article by the Chronicle of Higher Education, MOOCs have the potential to transform the way instructors’ handle their classroom by turning a traditional lecture based classroom into a ‘flipped classroom.’ Lectures oftentimes “masks a lot of disinterests” amongst students, causing only those interested in the subject to succeed.

In a flipped classroom, students typically watch video lectures provided by MOOCs as homework then save interactive discussions and projects for the classroom. Doing this provides students more time to communicate with their instructor in rich conversations. It also causes the instructor to act more as a guide working with students rather than working for students.

The biggest concern about integrating MOOCs into a classroom is instructor control. In traditional classrooms, instructors get total control of the classroom whether its material use, presentation, or assessment. When instructors switch to a flipped classroom, they need to work their discussions, projects, etc. around the MOOC lecture they have students watch.

It’s a large risk for instructors to make the switch, especially if they have insecurities. But with instructors like Douglas Fisher, who was mentioned in the article, making the switch was  necessary in order to take the next step in higher education.

Kerika: A Task Board Designed for Distributed Teams

Group projects, when looked at as a whole, are a great idea. They call for collaborative teamwork, idea contribution, and utilizing individuals skill sets and experiences. Most of the time students learn from their group experiences, while with others, something went wrong along the way.

Oftentime the biggest factor in the flop of group work is the lack of communication. With our diverse population at UWB having different life schedules, it is hard to find face to face time to get together with group members. Students then rely on email, texting, Google Drive, Facebook, etc. but conversations become scattered as different layers of group projects reveal itself on different outlets of communication.

Read More!