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Mobile Learning Practices in Higher Education

A recent study published on Educause takes a look into the mobile learning practices of students in higher education.

The study notes that mobile device usage has increased significantly among college students, and that they favor small and lightweight devices such as smartphones and tablets. However 85% of students still consider a laptop to be the most important device for academic success.

As mobile device use expands on campus, the study looks to understand how the students are using their devices. Students were given a survey to determine device prevalence and if they were being used for academic purposes. The study found that 91% of student owned a smartphone while only 58% of those students used them for academic purposes. Tablet ownership was only 37% of those questioned, though 82% of owners used them for school.

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The UTeach Institute Partners with Verizon to Help Teachers Integrate Mobile Technologies into STEM Teaching

In an article published by MarketWatch, the UTeach Institute Launch Program has recently partnered up with Verizon to launch a program that aims to provide teaching support and assistance for future teachers wishing to effectively integrate mobile technology into STEM programs. Students, who are interested in STEM subjects (science, technology, engineering, and math), will benefit from this program, which ultimately hopes to improve student learning and interest in STEM at the higher education level by providing a relevant and exciting approach to teaching and learning in the STEM subjects.

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6 Ways Technology Will Change Education in the Future

Just recently, a group of academics, venture capitalists, and entrepreneurs gathered at New York University’s Stern School of Business to discuss educational technologies and their effects on the future of higher education. A critical question was posed about the future of higher education as technology continues to play a crucial role in the accessibility and distribution of education: How will higher education and/or the notion of “college” change as platforms, such as MOOCs, become common for others to use as alternatives to the traditional classroom and campus environment?

Stepping in to learn more about what was discussed during the meeting, Issie Lapowsky, a writer for Inc.com, explains how, even though many posed opposing viewpoints on the topic of technology and higher education, all came to a consensus on the simple fact that higher education will have to be restructured and that the “status quo is not an option”, as stated by NYU’s President John Sexton.

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Can Gaming Become Higher Education’s Future?

We’ve heard of gaming being integrated in primary school, but what about higher education? According to studies conducted by Gallup, the levels of student engagement fades the longer they stay in school. Engagement levels drop from 76% in elementary school to 44% in high school.

EdTech revealed in a recent article that levels of engagement has the potential to increase if colleges and universities integrate games into the classroom. Games are developed to create emotions of joy, pride, creativity, and curiosity just to name a few. It makes sense to want to integrate gaming in higher education- school is designed to be competitive just like a game. But if students fail they don’t have positive emotional resilience like gamers do, EdTech claims.

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Future of Education Concerned with Instructors’ Technology Literacy

In The Chronicle of Higher Education’s report on Campus Computing Project’s annual senior technology administrator survey, the biggest concern (a whopping 80% from those who responded) was the capability of instructors to use emerging technology within the next few years.

It is very likely that students have witnessed this before: an instructor has pledged to make a grand presentation in the class, yet cannot seem to load PowerPoint. On countless occasions, more time is spent troubleshooting instructor’s technological flop than time spent teaching and learning.

With technology rapidly unfolding and the integration of classroom online learning resources such as Canvas, instructors need to have enough knowledge in technology in order to have an effective learning environment. Just as owning a camera does not make one a photographer, having a tablet does not make one a better instructor. Now more than ever, instructors need to catch up in this cat and mouse game before students begin to teach their teachers.