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UWB News & Resources

LT Labs – Winter 2016

UWB Faculty, LT Labs are back! RSVP Today!

The Learning Technologies team is continuing the popular LT Labs series this Winter.

Topics include:

  • Strategies for Grading – 9am: Tuesday, Feb 7 and 2pm: Wednesday, Feb 8
  • Inclusive Active Learning – 9am: Tuesday, Feb 21 and 2pm: Wednesday, Feb 22
  • Giving Students Feedback in Canvas: 9am: Tuesday, Feb 28 and 2pm: Wednesday, March 1

You can register, for one or more of these sessions, on the Learning Technologies Website.

Need Help Teaching with Technology?

University of Washington Bothell’s Learning Technologies department provides support for the integration of technology in teaching and learning for faculty and staff. We work to enhance student learning through the most efficient and effective use of instructional technology. We also provide technology consultations, one-on-one training, workshops, and other services that are beneficial to an innovative learning environment. In addition, we manage and support the The Open Learning Lab. If you are interested in how to best incorporate technology into new or updated assignments and projects or if you’re learning how to use new software or technology tools, please contact Learning Technologies for assistance and more information.

Welcome to UW Bothell Learning Technologies!

In this video, Andreas Brockhaus, Director of Learning Technologies at  UW Bothell and the UWB Learning Technology team introduce some of the services provided to support faculty and students.

UW Bothell Receives Recognition in Promoting Accessibility and Universal Design in Instruction on Campus

During the UDAL Forum and Pizza event held June 3, 2016, Dr. Sheryl Burgstahler presented UW Bothell campus with the 1st Annual IT Capacity Building award. This award recognizes the current efforts at the UW Bothell campus in promoting Universal Design for Learning awareness and training.

Andreas Capacity Building Institute Award given to UW Bothell June 2016Brockhaus, Director of Learning Technologies at UW Bothell, coined the acronym UDAL (Universal Design for Active Learning) as a local effort to integrate Universal Design for Learning principles in supporting student active learning and engagement. The core group leading this effort is comprised of Ana Thompson, Learning Technologist (Learning Technologies), Sara Frizelle, eLearning Planning and Research Specialist (Learning Technologies), Jeane Marty, Web Developer (Web Services), Ashley Magdall, Web Support Specialist (Advancement) and Rosa Lundborg, Program Manager (Disability Resources for Students).

The goal of the CBI is to engage web managers and developers, IT administrators and service providers, procurement officers, disability services providers, and students with disabilities in a discussion that will ultimately lead to improved capacity within the three campuses of our university to carry out our educational mission in a way that is accessible to everyone.

 

The 2016 UWB eLearning Summer Symposium: A Student Perspective

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Technology and education have close ties with one another, however, I believe it can be safe to say that technology seems to be utilized more to entertain, rather than to educate. The combination of the two has opened many doors to innovative ways of teaching to the generation of college students that interact with these gadgets and gizmos on a daily basis. I think it’s also safe to say that young adults of this generation love technology and social media. Students are constantly being exposed to a plethora of new games and apps that keep tech within their reach. With all these ‘lovely distractions’ threatening to forever hold the attention of our young minds, educators in higher education must find new ways  to integrate these ‘lovely distractions’ in a way that keeps students not only engaged, but actually building knowledge while in the learning space.

In July, I had the pleasure of being able to attend an event that took place at the University of Washington Bothell called the eLearning Summer Symposium. This event was focused on active learning strategies and ideas for creating more engaging learning spaces. There were several engaging presentations and opportunities for educators to share ideas with each other on topics ranging from tech tools, to active teaching and learning techniques, to OER (Open Educational Resources), and UDAL (Universal Design for Active Learning).

There were a two presentations that really stood out because of the utilization of technology and social media in a way the really engaged students.  The first presenter, Dr. Dan Bustillos, faculty in the School of Nursing and Health Studies, spoke about the importance of not only getting his students to learn about the mechanics of implementing health policy, but also that it was very important for students to experience the aftermath of putting policies in play and how it affects the overall situation. He explained that experience is gained by having to deal with making those tough decisions in the moment when the stressors are high and having to consider all cause and effect scenarios. Dr. Bustillos described that beyond just teaching these policies to his students there wasn’t really a vehicle in which he could simulate that experience to better engage his students. That led him to creating a game based course, which he built using an Excel worksheet. This game allows him to create simulations that put the players, aka students, in a position to decide amongst different strategies based on their coursework the best course of action for each stage of the game.  He claimed that this idea significantly increased student engagement because it was in the form of a game in which students are quite familiar with.

Another instructor, Dr. Jane Van Galen, faculty in the School of Educational Studies, integrates the use of Twitter into her classroom. Dr. Van Galen found it can be a valuable resource due to it being a sort of central hub of the Internet. Twitter connects policymakers, journalists, advocacy groups, professionals, and the general public in the same social space. She explained that Twitter users can share a variety of media including news, opinions, web links, and conversations in a publicly accessible space. She explained how the use of Twitter had several benefits in her classroom. She found that it draws students out into the ‘open’, ushering them into developing social networks for ongoing learning. She sees potential for connections beyond the classroom, and shared an example of how one of her student’s tweets was commented on by a well-known scholar, whose work the student had referenced in her original tweet. Dr. Van Galen also provided examples of how Twitter has the ability to amplify the student voice because tweets can be tagged by other groups or organizations. This ability to tag a tweet notifies members of the group or organization of the tweet and then notifies the potential thousands of individuals that follow that particular group or organization.  She found that engagement in her class skyrocketed when Twitter was used as vehicle for her class’s subject matter. From my perspective, a student perspective, these two presentations were the most exciting to witness because of the possible applications in other subjects.

Overall, it was a great time and I hope that these sort of events continue to take place. It is important that as we adapt to new technology we also adapt our ways of using and applying it not only just for entertainment purposes, but also to educate.

Tim Williams

Evaluating Web Page Accessibility

This month is the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disability Act, which is a federal legislation designed “to [eliminate] discrimination against people with disabilities.” Often times students with disabilities can be left out of online curriculum, which is why it is important to evaluate if your webpage is accessible. In an a recent article George Williams discussed how you can evaluate your webpage for accessibility, he noted the best way to engage in accessibility testing is with actual people. However there are also a number of helpful tools that can automatically check your site for the most important accessibility issues:

  • Wave Toolbar
    WAVE can help you evaluate the accessibility of your web content. WAVE is easy to use, you simply enter the web page address or browse to a file on your computer and select WAVE this page. WAVE will then provide you with a report section at the top of your page with embedded icons and error indicators. RED icons indicate accessibility errors and GREEN icons indicate accessibility features.
  • HTML_CodeSniffer
    HTML_CodeSniffer Is a client-side JavaScript application that checks an HTML document or source code for violations of a defined coding standard. It can be extended by developers to enforce custom coding standards by creating your own “sniffs”. This bookmarklet can work with almost any browser.
  • Tota11y
    Tota11y helps visualize how your site performs with assistive technologies. Testing for accessibility is often tedious and confusing, but tota11y aims to reduce this barrier by helping visualize accessibility violations. Your file will have a small button in the bottom of your corner document, once you click on the button you are able to see the accessibility problems your web page may have.
  • Pa11y
    Allows you to check the accessibility of web pages your own or others. If you are more interested in fixing issues rather than hunting them down you can use pa11y-dashboard.

You can also look at W3C web accessibility evaluation tools list. Over 40 tools listed are software programs or online services that can help determine if the webpage is accessible. All these tools will help evaluate webpage accessibility to ensure everyone can enjoy your webpage.