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General Resources

Canvas on the Go!

As the school year draws ever closer to its end, you may be getting more and more stressed about the final assignments, projects, and/or tests that you have coming up (as well as your plans over break!).

To help alleviate that stress a bit and provide you greater accessibility, Instructure has created free Android and iOS mobile apps for its Canvas LMS that many UWB instructors use. Whether you are a student or an instructor, these apps will allow you to access your Canvas account on the go!

Learning how to use new apps can always be a bit time-consuming though, so UWB LT has created new tutorial walk-throughs to help speed things up. To view them, just click here, or go to http://www.uwb.edu/learningtech/help/how-to/canvas-for-faculty/canvas-mobile!

canvas mobile apps

Introducing the Learning Technologies Video Tutorial Library

Here at UW Bothell Learning Technologies, we’ve produced dozens of video tutorials to help UW students, faculty and staff find their way around technologies like Canvas, UW Google Apps, Tegrity and more. Previously, all of the videos could only be found on the site among the written tutorial pages. In an effort to make our video selection more centralized and easier to browse, we’re introducing the Learning Technologies Video Tutorial Library!

vtl

The library–which will also be continuously updated as new content is published–features links to all Learning Technologies videos as well as the tutorial pages where they are embedded (provided the pages still exist). The videos are organized by the tool they are associated with, which you can quickly navigate from the shortcut links at the top of the page.

We hope that this will make the videos on our site easier to find and more convenient to anyone looking for help or interested in learning something new!

ePortfolio Resources at UW Bothell

As we approach the end of the academic year, students across programs are gathering and reflecting on their curricular, co-curricular, and extracurricular work; they are thinking about their futures and possible paths to take to achieve their goals; and they are writing essays that provide coherent narratives of their personal, academic, and professional trajectories. In other words, students are working on electronic portfolios (eportfolios).

All first-year students in CUSP complete an eportfolio as a culminating project for their first year experiences. Tasked with reflecting on at least three artifacts of their own learning, like papers, projects, presentations, and artworks, CUSP students write an evidence-based narrative essay to show where they have been, where they are now, and where they are going, in terms of their academic and professional goals.

Students in the School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences (SIAS) produce degree portfolios in which they demonstrate their achievement of the SIAS learning goals. Started in the first major-level course, BIS 300 Interdisciplinary Inquiry, and completed in BIS 499, the Capstone Portfolio course, the eportfolio works as a tool for student learning as well as an instrument for programmatic assessment.

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Teaching and Learning with Technology

In this month’s Provost Report at the University of Washington, “Putting Learning First: How Students Learn and How Technology Can Help“, the focus was on strategies for teaching and learning with technology. Although technology in the classroom is something that is fairly widespread, it is still something that needs careful planning and consideration. The report is a great guide of ideas and “best practices” when taking steps toward a tech-friendly classroom.

The report first mentions that a course shouldn’t be organized around a technology tool. The entire purpose of educational technology is to enhance learning through the use of technology…therefore, the technology used should fit in naturally with the course and there must be a purpose for it. All too often, instructors make the mistake of using a technology tool just for the sake of using it. If it’s not helping students learn the course content, it may simply serve as a distraction, or even hindrance. Therefore, it’s important to ask questions like, “what technology could be more effective at getting the point across?” or “How accessible is this technology, both in and out of the classroom?” This reminds me of a graphic Edudemic posted last week in their article “5 Features Technology Must Have Before Classroom Use“:

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Canvas, Plain and Simple: What UW Bothell Faculty Need To Know To Prepare for Summer 2013

As we approach a full transition to the Canvas learning management system this Summer (meaning, we will not create Blackboard course sites for Summer courses), you might be asking yourself questions such as, “What do I need to know now?” and “How should I be preparing for Summer quarter?”. This article will attempt to answer these questions clearly.

What do I need to know now?

First, you need to know that Canvas is available for you to use right now. So, if you haven’t started using it already, you could begin using Canvas starting Spring quarter. If you don’t know where or how to start, we recommend attending one of our Canvas workshops. The final workshop of Winter quarter is: Thursday, March 7 from 2:30 to 4 PM. If you’re interested in coming, please complete this short survey (seriously short) to let us know you are coming. In the workshops, we’ll cover how to transfer course materials from Blackboard and provide an overview on the various features available in Canvas. We’ll also be offering additional workshops during Spring quarter (still to be scheduled).

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