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LT Newsletter Spring 2013

Digital Scholarship at UW Bothell

Digital media production is an important form of scholarly research and instruction here at the University of Washington Bothell. Below is a list of student made media projects links and information about the class, topics and professors that made this work possible.

Prof. Jill Freidberg’s “Working with Audio” class produced a great collection of audio storytelling projects last quarter. “Sound surrounds us. It’s the invisible element that only becomes obvious when it goes away. Sound is information, stories, location, and memories. It tells us where we are and where we’re going. It fills in the blanks. It forces our imaginations to create the pictures that go with the sounds we hear. It reminds us of places we’ve been, things we’ve done, and feelings we’ve had. Sound alerts us to danger, sets us at ease, wakes us up and puts us to sleep. Sound is everywhere.” – From the BIS 234 Course Description

http://bis234.weebly.com/our-work.html

Prof. Jane VanGalen’s education students put together an excellent RSA video called “The Muses Go to School: Inspiring Stories about the Importance of Arts in Education”.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7qLKQlY8bAI

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Conversations on Hybrid Teaching and Learning at UW Bothell

In three short presentations at the May 9 event Conversations about Hybrid Learning, Tony Smith, Ph.D. (Education), Martha Groom, Ph.D. (SIAS), and Jamie Shirley, Ph.D. (Nursing and Health Studies) described the opportunities and challenges they encountered while teaching hybrid courses in their respective disciplines. Their thoughtful and nuanced remarks on teaching hybrid classes framed a discussion among those faculty, teaching staff, and librarians in attendance.

Ranging from 30 to 40 percent hybrid — meaning 30 to 40 percent of the in-class time was replaced with online or out of class work — the courses taught by Drs. Smith, Groom, and Shirley leveraged technologies and hybrid course design to enhance student engagement, to provide flexibility in the course schedule, and to give students opportunities to learn in their own style and at their own pace.

Not surprisingly, they encountered challenges as well. Dr. Smith found that his students disliked the multiple platforms the course used simultaneously (wiki software, Ning.com, and Blackboard LMS), and Dr. Groom found that the reduced time in the classroom may have exacerbated the issues of already-struggling students.

For Dr. Shirley, the move to the hybrid modality was a response to an exigency: due to holidays and the potential for inclement weather during Winter quarter, she knew that she would lose at least two of ten class meetings and perhaps more with a snow storm. Therefore, she created online modules for her ethics class, which included videos and worksheets that her students completed and then submitted online.

Check out the recordings of their remarks to learn more about their work:

http://www.uwb.edu/learningtech/elearning/hybrid-learning/faculty-hybrid/example-uwb-hybrid