UW Bothell | Learning Technologies

16 Suggestions for Teaching with Classroom Response Systems

16 Suggestions for Teaching with Classroom Response Systems

1. Consider the following questions when drafting clicker questions:

* What student learning goals do I have for the question?

* What do I hope to learn about my students by asking this question?

* What will my students learn about each other when they see the results of this question?

* How might this question be used to engage students with course content in small-group or classwide

discussions or by creating a time for telling?

* What distribution of responses do I expect from my students?

* What might I do if the actual distribution turns out very differently?

2. Look for answer choices for potential clicker questions in student responses to open-ended questions, ones asked on assignments in previous courses, on homework questions, or during class. This can lead to answer choices that better match common student misconceptions and perspectives.

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Digital Devices Depriving Brain of Needed Downtime

Digital Devices Depriving Brain of Needed Downtime

For many people, every minute of time away from work and daily routine such as being stuck  in line at the checkout stand, waiting for the bus, or just simply working out in the gym is a time to pull out the iPod, cell phone, or other digital device and start checking on e-mail, text messages, or just simply play a quick game of tetris.

Recent advances in technology for such devices have turned smartphones in to full-fledged computers with high-speed internet connections which have made “the tiniest windows of time entertaining, and potentially productive”.

However, scientists point out that an unintended side-effect of all this digital input is that people are now unable to process information that could help them to remember information or formulate new ideas.

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E-Textbooks: “An Interesting Ride”

E-Textbooks: “An Interesting Ride”

E-Textbooks: “An Interesting Ride” Paul Musket, Darla Runyon, and Robin Schulze The following excerpt is based on an interview conducted at the EDUCAUSE annual meeting in October 2009 by Gerry Bayne, EDUCAUSE multimedia producer. To listen to the full podcast, go to In Conversation: The E-Textbook Conundrum. Gerry Bayne: One study I recently read suggestsRead more about E-Textbooks: “An Interesting Ride”[…]

Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education

Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education

Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education is a publication of the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education. Established with funding from a U.S. Department of Education Preparing Tomorrow’s Teachers to Use Technology (PT3) catalyst grant, CITE Journal makes possible the inclusion of sound, animated images, and simulation, as well as allowing for ongoing,Read more about Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education[…]