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Developing Effective Learning Goals for Hybrid and Face-to-Face Classes

Having good course learning goals are essential for not only developing effective hybrid classes but for teaching courses in any format whether face-to-face, hybrid and online.

Essentially, learning goals answer the question of what a student will have learned.

For students, learning goals help to illuminate what’s important in a course and make it easier to reflect on their learning at the end of a course. This learning roadmap is especially important for students who are taking a hybrid course since there is more out-of-classroom learning which can sometimes lead to miscommunication.

For faculty, learning goals can help structure a course and make it easier to determine what will be evaluated throughout the course. Course-level goals can also be used to create learning goals for modules or units within a course.

So what goes into creating a good learning goal?

1. It should be measurable and something that can be clearly assessed. Avoid using the word “understand” when creating goals since it’s a vague term that’s hard to assess.

2. It should be clearly written (avoid jargon) and use concrete action verbs. The Office of Educational Development at UC Berkley has created a great list of action verbs tied to Bloom’s Taxonomy of Learning which can be used to create learning goals.

List of Action Verbs

Knowledge

Comprehension

Application

Analysis

Synthesis

Evaluation

define
describe
examine
identify
indicate
know
label
list
match
name
outline
recall
recognize
record
relate
reproduce
restate
select
show
state

choose
cite
convert
defend
describe
detect
discuss
distinguish
estimate
explain
extend
generalize
give examples
identify
infer
locate
paraphrase
predict
recognize
rephrase
report
restate
select
summarize

act
administer
apply
change
collect
compute
construct
control
convert
demonstrate
derive
develop
diagram
discover
employ
estimate
facilitate
generalize
help
illustrate
implement
interpret
manipulate
modify
operate
perform
practice
predict
prepare
present
produce
provide
regulate
schedule
share
show
solve
use

analyze
appraise
assess
break down
calculate
categorize
classify
compare
contrast
debate
deduce
describe
detect
diagram
differentiate
discriminate
distinguish
elicit
examine
extrapolate
identify
illustrate
infer
inspect
question
recognize
reflect
relate
select
solve
sort
systematize
tabulate
test

adapt
arrange
articulate
assemble
collaborate
combine
communicate
compose
consolidate
construct
create
design
develop
devise
establish
explain
formulate
generate
incorporate
initiate
integrate
intervene
justify
manage
modify
organize
plan
predict
prepare
propose
reflect
relate
revise
summarize
synthesize
tell
write

appraise
assess
collaborate
compare
conclude
contrast
criticize
critique
describe
discriminate
estimate
evaluate
explain
interpret
judge
justify
measure
rate
reconsider
reflect
relate
summarize
support
validate
verify

 

3. Make sure you provide information to students on how they can meet the learning goals. Refer back to the goals with all of your assignments.

You can read more about learning goals from UC Berkley’s concise learning goals page and at Western Washington University’s course improvement handbook (chapters 5 and 6).

 

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