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Instructure and Microsoft add Integration between Canvas and Office 365

Having a connection between Office 365 and Canvas will greatly impact the lives of students and teachers. Not only will it be easier to submit assignments and such, but all of these applications are created in the cloud, therefore minimizing the use of personal storage.

If you don’t know what Office 365 is, it’s quite similar to Google Doc’s however it is created by Microsoft and boasts their current Microsoft Office applications, all using web browsers and all data stored is in the cloud (also quite similar to Google Docs).

The new integrations that users will be able to use are:

* Submitting files directly from Office 365 to specific Canvas assignments

* Access Office 365 through canvas SpeedGrader to add feedback (This is important for teachers as there was a bit of a disconnect for specific comments at certain spots of a paper)

* You can link Office 365 documents anywhere on Canvas

* Directly connect Office 365 documents in course modules

* Collaborate with other peers in class using any type of Office documents

* Grade and create assignments in OneNote and push those grades to canvas

* Signing into one, means signing into Office 365 as well

This integration will make using Canvas and Office 365 easier in terms of collaborating both programs together.

eLearning Summer Symposium: Choose Your Next Teaching and Learning Adventure!

Looking for the next adventure in your teaching?

Looking to get ideas from your UWB Peers?

Looking to ways to more fully engage your students?

 

Let us help you choose your next teaching and learning adventure!


Join Us

eLearning Summer Symposium

August 10, 2016

9am – 3pm

North Creek Events Center

 

This one-day event will include:

  • Engaging presentations with Jane Van Galen, Bryan White, Todd Conaway in addition to other UWB faculty and staff
  • Idea sharing round tables with topics ranging from tech tools, to active teaching and learning techniques, to OER, and UDL
  • The opportunity to experience Active Learning strategies
  • A free lunch

Let us know if you will be joining us at the eLearning Summer Symposium and choosing your own next teaching adventure. There is still space available, so please sign up no later than Monday, August 1st.

Sponsored by UWB Learning Technologies

3 Ways Pokemon Go Can Create Learning Opportunities

Pokemon is taking over college campuses all over the country. If you haven’t heard of Pokemon Go, it’s a modern Pokemon game available for free via Android or IOS app. Users are trainers in a virtual reality attempting to catch all the Pokemon within the user’s reach. How can schools use Pokemon Go as an education experience?

Pokemon Go uses the location and camera to create a virtual reality. Students can screenshot the Pokemon they are about to catch and save the pictures to their camera roll. Later, students can use the pictures for classroom projects to create digital stories.

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PokeStops are popular locations that provide users with educational information before collecting Pokemon Balls or Potions. A journal in the app collects all the Pokemon users catch, including date and time. Students can use the date to figure out the average number of events per day or graph the items collected from a PokeStop.

Washington State University is now incorporating Pokemon Go in their campus tours. WSU Tri-Cities will incorporate a portion of their 15 Pokestops. The tour will also includes stops at 2 different Pokemon gyms and extra time to hunt for a Charmander or other characters in the game. Seanna Coleman, lead WSU Tri-Cities student ambassador, shared “We thought this would be a fun way to incorporate an additional digital element in the tour, while allowing prospective students and their families to view our beautiful university campus along the Columbia River”.

Click here to learn more!

Click here to learn more about WSU’s Poke Tours.

The Majority of Institutions Offer Other Forms of Credentials

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According to a new study done by University Professional and Continuing Education Association (UPCEA), Pennsylvania State University and Pearson, millennial students tend to lean towards badging and certificate programs as opposed to the traditional bachelor’s degree.

The study, titled “Demographic Shifts in Educational Demand and the Rise of Alternative Credentials” includes research conducted from 190 institutions, including community colleges (11 percent), baccalaureate colleges (12 percent), master’s colleges or universities (27 percent), and doctorate-granting universities (50 percent). Of those surveyed, 61 percent of them were public institutions. Overall, the research revealed that offering alternative credentials, such as digital badges, certificates, and micro credentials, have become popular, with 94 percent of institutions reporting that they offer this.

Digital badges are online representations of skills learned by students, typically with visual iconography; certificates are usually issued by educational institutions to students who have completed significant programs of study that do not culminate in a specific degree; while micro credentials are digitally presented certifications providing evidence that an individual has mastered a specific skill or area of knowledge that demonstrates their learning.

Director of UPCEA’s Center for Research Marketing Strategy, Jim Fong; director of the Center for Online Innovation in Learning and a professor at Penn State, Kyle Peck; and senior director of business development at Pearson’s Acclaim, Peter Janzow all conducted the study. They have also found that:

* One in five institutions offers digital badges

* Digital badges are most commonly offered in business-related domains

* Institutions with corporate engagement value alternative credentialing more than institutions that did not

* Sixty-four percent of those surveyed agree that their institution sees alternative credentialing as an important strategy for its future

According to Fong, “The degree will always be an important credential, but it won’t always be the gold standard. As millennials enter the prime years of their career and move into positions of greater power, we’ll see more alternative credentials for specific industries and possibly across the board. Higher education institutions, especially those in our survey, are showing that they are being progressive with workforce needs.” For more information, please visit UPCEA’s website for more information.

Twitter in Higher ED

Institutions are finding new ways to use social media in the classroom. Twitter helps connect faculty and staff with students on a new level. Millennials use technology on a daily basis. Twitter helps students do what they enjoy while building their education. Students are using technology as a tool to broadcast safety messages across campus and promote collaboration among peers. For example, Kansas State University has a LiveSafe app, which allows students to quickly report crimes from a drop-down menu.

Joshua Kim. the director of digital learning initiatives at the Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning, shared that having a successful higher ed use of Twitter is not reflected in the amount of Twitter followers the account has. Kim shared three best practices for getting the most out of Twitter:

* Make sure tweets fit into large conversations and don’t read like a monologue

* Share information your network will find useful: links, data and commentary

* Write in a voice that followers will find authentic and well informed

Kim also shared how helpful hashtags can be. For example, higher ed leaders attending August’s Campus Technology Conference in Boston used #campustech. The conference brings leaders from the fields of higher education and technology together to explore campus administration, and teaching and learning. The hashtag, #campustech, was used to catch all the activity going on. Thus, helping their audience find conference content through a simple search.

If you follow these practices, you will be able to make the most of higher ed while using Twitter. Helpings students, faculty and staff learn.

Click here to read more.