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“Old Fashioned” Note Taking More Efficient than Computers

According to the Chronicle of Higher Education, students who take notes with a pen or pencil and paper is more likely to benefit in the classroom than those taking notes with their computers. The study will publish in Psychological Science titled “The Pen is Mightier than the Keyboard: Advantages of Longhand Over Laptop Note-taking.”

During the study, students received either a notebook and pen or a laptop (not connected to WiFi) to take notes then were tested on recalling facts and applying concepts. Those who did not use a computer earned higher scores on applying concepts than those who did. The fact recalling test had similar results.

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The Students are Not the Problem in Flipped Learning

In an article written by Robert Talbert for The Chronicle of Higher Education, Talbert carefully examines and explains the comments he received in a previous article he had written about the definition of Flipped Learning. He explains, with 6 main points, how and why students are not the problem when it comes to successfully implementing a flipped learning course. Here are just some of his points:

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Gmail Played a Role in Changing Higher Ed

Gmail celebrated its 10th birthday on April 1st. Reflecting back, they altered higher education more than we know according to Inside Higher Ed.

Transitioning from enterprise platforms to consumer platforms, Gmail is helping the technological world retreat from centralized technology control with a slick, free platform that any higher ed institution can use. UW Bothell has already gone aboard to using Gmail and other Google apps.

This transition is especially great for students who prefer to utilize their own technology at school. Remember only 10 years ago when schools rolled out carts of uniform laptops loaded with the same software? Now students have the option to stop relying on Outlook or Microsoft Office and use the wonders of Gmail, Google Drive, and other online applications. Because of these programs, schools no longer need to worry as much about mandatory software and their updates.

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Suggestions for Improving Privacy in Higher Education

In a blog post written by Tracy Mitrano for Inside Higher Ed’s “Law, Policy — and IT?” blog, three suggestions for improving privacy in higher education were stated:

  1. Reform the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)
    • Mitrano suggests that FERPA, which was passed by Congress in 1974, should be reformed to meet the needs of higher education institutions and universities. Mitrano points out that FERPA does not have “specific technical security safeguards…” and its age suggests how outdated the law is in complying with practices and present-day issues with technology, privacy, and education.

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A “Small” Approach to Education with Technology

Education and technology have worked for the betterment of larger institutions and universities. The technology used by these institutions help to solve accessibility issues and are a way for both students and faculty to become acquainted, familiar, and experts with using technology for teaching and learning.

However, some smaller institutions, such as Deep Springs College, simply find the use of technology unsuitable for their specific types of studies, which include academics, involvement with a democratic governance, and a labor program. This brings up the question of whether technology is absolutely necessary for the success and quality of these institutions. Will technology always be a benefit, or is it how it can be applied to solve specific and unique problems that can only be found in certain smaller institutions?

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