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Social media is not only a part of our social lives but professional as well. LinkedIn is a website and company that takes this idea of social media, but allows users to boast and explain their professional background and aspirations. Students should be getting connected to this online professional website to look for opportunities that they might not possibly get anywhere else. However, this website also has an app that is available in the Google Play, Apple, and Microsoft store for smart phones and tablets.

The reason why this app is innovative is because you can take your professionalism and opportunities on-the-go. The app allows you to message, view profiles, edit your own profile, and request/deny connections with other professionals. LinkedIn is the type of website that students rarely log into, however with the app you can have the same capability as using the website on your phone. You can opt to receive notifications when people view your profile, messages that you receive from other professionals, and when people request to connect with you.

Opportunities for professional growth are always available from a multitude of resources. LinkedIn is one of those resources that can help kick-start your career. Most internship applications will request your LinkedIn profile URL in order to scope out information that they might not have gotten from your resume or cover letter. Not only can people see your professional history and bio, LinkedIn allows other users to endorse other users on skills that they might have seen you use. Having a lot of endorsements can help you get an opportunity that professionals are looking for in an employee.

Why Blogging Is Key to the Future of Higher Ed


Photo credit to Prasan

At Virginia Commonwealth University, nearly 30,000 students were encouraged to start blogging about their schoolwork. It was a way to incorporate social media, something that almost all college students are fond of, with education.

Gardner Campbell, Vice Provost for learning innovation and student success, said that this “catastrophic success…does not do justice to his real vision for both VCU and higher education.” He wants to change the direction, definition and purpose of concepts like online education and curriculum.

VCU worked with a vendor to set up a WordPress installation that would allow students to communicate with each other and their teachers as well as do their work online. Campbell explains how these blogs can act as an e-Portfolio. Since it is public, any other staff and faculty will be able to access it and view students’ work.

One example of using blogging for coursework was when students were asked to go out and take pictures of plants, post them on their blogs and add tags to them. This helped when biology students were studying botany.

Campbell referred to this as a catastrophic success in spite of the few disadvantages that the web can pose, such as poor connectivity. There can also be a low limit of how many students can sign up for the blog.

Nonetheless, Campbell said that VCU should look past the technological challenges and focus on the potential that this approach can have. This is just a work in progress, and could help advocates understand that a culture of a university should be more about content and course delivery.

For more information on this topic visit the link below.

Source: http://campustechnology.com/Articles/2015/05/27/Why-Blogging-Is-Key-to-the-Future-of-Higher-Ed.aspx?Page=3

The Power of LinkedIn

LinkedIn is well known social media site widely used by colleges and students everywhere. In an article on The Chronicle of Higher Education regarding LinkedIn’s latest big move, people everywhere can get a better idea of how much it has grown and how useful it really is. LinkedIn announced that it would spend $1.5 billion to buy Lynda.com, a provider of consumer-focused online courses. This will be huge step for LinkedIn and can make it even better, but lets not forget what it already provides for its users.


LinkedIn already offers its users college rankings, university pages and multiple tools for all 350 members to crowd source tips and advice on where to go to college or what courses to take. What will happen once LinkedIn makes this purchase? Many say different things, but all are very positive.Some say that this is a sharp reminder to colleges that if they don’t push forward in helping students as well as the alumni with career transitions, there are others, such as LinkedIn, that will be there to help them fill that void.

The fact that people today are starting to think of credentials in a different way helps LinkedIn even more. For example, there’s a move to upgrade academic transcripts to make them a more valuable record for employers. In other words, put them into a machine. Mathew Pittinsky, a founder of both Blackboard and Parchment, even says that the more records that are “machine readable” the better.

LinkedIn happens to be sitting on a “gold mine of data” with a specific set of job skills that are needed for careers in specific cities. So colleges should engage with the company and get their students involved. LinkedIn isn’t here to take over colleges, it is here to work them and the ones under their roof. But to truly get a better understanding of what LinkedIn’s intentions are and what it is capable of, visit the site above and see what the future of LinkedIn has in store.

Differences Between Blogs and Journal Entries


In an article on The Chronicle for Higher Education, Casey Fabris takes a look at a study done on the differences between public blogs and private journal entries.

With the current hype about blogging, Drew foster, a doctoral candidate in sociology, decided to try them in his introduction to sociology course. He immediately noticed a higher quality of work than what he had seen when students submitted private journals. He then decided to see what differences there might be between the two formats.

Initially he had expected to find that blogs resulted in more thoughtful reflections, which didn’t seem to be the case. After looking through a large collection of journal and blog entries from the University of Michigan, he discovered that one format wasn’t necessarily better than another, they were just different.

It seemed that when students were writing for a public blog, where fellow students could see and comment, they took more intellectual risks, crafting complex arguments on controversial discussions. While students who where tasked with writing a private journal took more personal risks sharing their own personal experiences.

As an example, Mr. Foster mentions that a student discussing the American dream may use her own family’s socioeconomic status or financial struggles; however, she might hesitate the share something so personal on a public blog.

Ultimately, it comes down to instructors needing to decide what is best for their courses. Mr. Foster goes on to say, “It’s to our benefit as teachers and instructors to try and maximize the type of reflection and the quality of reflection that students are engaging in.”

Why We are Looking at the ‘Value’ of College All Wrong

It’s no secret that higher education is expensive. It’s also no secret that higher education is important. It’s drilled into the heads of children from the time they enter the public school system that their main goal should be to attend a college or university. But as the economy continues to struggle, many people speculate as to the value of their investment in higher education when they graduate deep into debt and are unable to find a job. They paid a great deal of money in order to make a great deal of money, but for some their investment never returns.

Never in history has knowledge been so accessible. We are never more than thirty seconds away from an abundance of information since new digital technologies have transformed society for young generations. Some can speculate as to the point of spending thousands of dollars to sit in a classroom and learn something they could easily learn from their couch on their phone. Why should they go into debt over this? St. John’s College President Christopher Nelson has the answer to this question in his article on the Washington Post Blog.



The answer is simple: Universities should not be promoting the transfer of information, but rather the maturation of the student attending. That is the true point of attending a university. Anyone can learn anything, but the ability to apply that learning and use it independently is what you take away from your four—or five or six—years in college. This theory comes from St. John’s College President Christopher B. Nelson.

Nelson believes that by removing the economic lens from our outlook on a college education we can see the true ‘value’ of our investment. We can better ourselves and our ability to interpret and gather information through attending college, through working with caring teachers, through participating in extracurricular activities, through applying our knowledge in an internship, through working on long-term projects. College has so many more benefits than monetary ones, and as a society we should start acknowledging them.

For more information on this subject visit the link above.