UW Bothell Learning Technologies Blog Rotating Header Image

social software

Using Backchannels in the Classroom

A backchannel is the use of networked computers to maintain several side-conversations while the main conversation is occurring concurrently. In higher education, a model of this would be an instructor lecturing about a topic with students collaborating in small groups at the same time. The Twitter Experiment at UT Dallas is an example of conducting a backchannel through the use of mobile technology.

This post at the Teaching with Classroom Response Systems blog  outlines nine possible uses of backchannels in education as well as several examples of backchannel use at other universities. Check out the page at: http://derekbruff.com/teachingwithcrs/?p=472

Pedagogy 2.0 Article

Future Learning Landscapes: Transforming Pedagogy through Social Software
Catherine McLoughlin and Mark J. W. Lee

Catherine McLoughlin and Mark J. W. Lee discuss the new pedagogical landscape made possible by the emergence of Web 2.0 social software, which allows users to become active contributors. Web 2.0 tools offer unparallelled opportunities for participation, productivity, and interaction. Through a discussion of emerging learning scenarios enabled by social software, McLoughlin and Lee posit that future learning environments must capitalize on the potential of Web 2.0 by combining social software tools with connectivist pedagogical models. The combination produces what the authors call Pedagogy 2.0, a model of learning in which learners are empowered to participate, learn, and create knowledge in ways that are personally meaningful and engaging.

“Pedagogy 2.0 is defined by:

  • Content: Microunits that augment thinking and cognition by offering diverse perspectives and representations to learners and learner-generated resources that accrue from students creating, sharing, and revising ideas;
  • Curriculum: Syllabi that are not fixed but dynamic, open to negotiation and learner input, consisting of bite-sized modules that are interdisciplinary in focus and that blend formal and informal learning;
  • Communication: Open, peer-to-peer, multifaceted communication using multiple media types to achieve relevance and clarity;
  • Process: Situated, reflective, integrated thinking processes that are iterative, dynamic, and performance and inquiry based;
  • Resources: Multiple informal and formal sources that are rich in media and global in reach;
  • Scaffolds: Support for students from a network of peers, teachers, experts, and communities; and
  • Learning tasks: Authentic, personalized, learner-driven and learner-designed, experiential tasks that enable learners to create content.

With this learner-based, communal, media-rich, flexible approach, Pedagogy 2.0 uses social software tools to enable the development of dynamic communities of learning through connectivity, communication, and participation.”

Link: http://innovateonline.info/index.php?view=article&id=539&action=synopsis