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Evernote Releases New iPad 2 App

Evernote has released a new app made especially for the iPad 2 and its Smart Cover. The app, now available on iTunes, is called Evernote Peek and is a memorization tool similar in functionality to digital flashcards. It’s the first app to be made for and operated by the Smart Cover.

Once the app has been installed on the iPad, the user can sync it up to their Evernote or StudyBlue account. Each flashcard set appears on the app in its own notebook. The user chooses a notebook and closes the Smart Cover to begin the exercise.

The app takes advantage of the 3 different folds in the iPad’s Smart Cover. When the user “peeks” by flipping up the cover to the first fold, the iPad reveals the first question or clue of the set. To reveal the answer, the user flips the cover up to the second fold. To move on to the next question, the user simply closes the cover completely, then starts the process again.

This is indeed an interesting use of one of the new features of the iPad 2. It will be exciting to see what other apps the Smart Cover may influence!

Want to see the app in action? Check out the video below:

Using Cell Phones in the Classroom

These days, nearly every college student owns a cell phone. In the classroom, cell phones are generally seen by the instructor as nothing more than a distraction. Step into any college classroom during a long lecture or in-class film, and chances are you’ll see a handful of students typing away and sending text messages to their friends. With this behavior becoming all too common, it is no doubt why professors despise the devices and are asking students to turn their cell phones off completely during class.

However, what students and instructors aren’t always realizing is the potential of cell phones in education. Students have access to very powerful devices, especially with the rising ownership of smartphones. An article published recently by Edudemic questions the next step of cell phones in education and offers the following interesting ways to harness the device’s power for effective use in education:

- Text Reminders: Since students generally check their cell phone more frequently than their email, the website Remind101 has come up with a way to reach students when they are away from their computer, but not their phone. The site allows instructors to create assignment reminders that are sent to students via text message. All the students have to do is register with the site and subscribe to the class’ reminders.

-Using the cell phone as a study tool: For students who want to study on-the-go, but don’t want to drag their heavy computer around there’s sites like StudyBoost. Once the student registers, they can create their own series of study questions. Then, using their phone, they can have the questions sent to them via text message. From there, the student answers the questions by replying to the StudyBoost number, and will instantly receive their results.

-Voting: Using Poll Everywhere, instructors can gather opinions and votes in their classroom. This tool also provides real time data, which is especially appealing to professors looking to save time.

-Accessing Twitter: Interestingly enough, Twitter is becoming increasingly present in the classroom. Obviously, smartphones have the ability to instantly access Twitter via apps or an internet browser. However, there are also easy ways to access Twitter with a basic phone! Users can tweet by registering their phone and sending a text message to their country’s short code. If the user isn’t able to send text messages, TweetCall is also an option. TweetCall is a free service that lets the user call a phone number, speak their tweets, and have them transcribed into text.

-Scavenger Hunt: Educational scavenger hunts are already a popular activity with cell phones in the classroom. There are many different programs and apps to run your scavenger hunt on, but the recommended program is SCVNGR. The program is compatible with both basic cell phones and smartphones, as many scavenger hunt apps are designed for smartphones with a GPS function.