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Class-Sourcing

In an article on Stanford’s Center for Teaching and Learning website Gleb Tsipursky examines the benefits of teaching using a new set of tools in our digital age, namely those that are available through the great invention of the internet. Today students are able to take advantage of website creation and artifact archiving to demonstrate the new information they have gained through their classroom experience. Tsipursky calls this phenomenon Class-Sourcing.

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Class-Sourcing is the integration of technology into the classroom through the use of website creation, artifact archival, blog writing, video creation, podcast creation, or any other media related design used to express ideas, research, or content they have gained from the class. Class-Sourcing takes advantage of group activities to help promote team building and prompts students to get creative in their expression of information.

Class-Sourcing has many benefits to the students who take advantage of it. They gain skills in digital literacy, data management, digital design, digital communication, collaboration, and public presentation to name a few. Each of these skills proves useful not only in the classroom but outside of it as well. Our age is becoming increasingly tech-oriented and employers are seeking tech-savvy individuals to fill the limited positions available. Students are able to create content they enjoy whilst learning the ins and outs of website creation which will benefit them for years to come.

Here at the University of Washington we have already integrated Class-Sourcing into our classrooms. Through the use of Canvas, Catalyst, Google Sites and much more professors are now able to offer their students an alternative to classic pen and paper school work. Students are able to create their own personal media content that they can upload directly to their teachers. Many professors have abandoned the use of physical papers and have adapted wholly to the online resources available to them. Students can archive all of their work from their college years onto their own personalized website that they can reference for years to come. This proves useful for students who graduate from this University, leaving with a portfolio full of experience to show to potential employers.

 

For more information on Class-Sourcing and its benefits visit the link above.

Higher Pass Rates for STEM Courses Using Active Learning

In a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and developed by lead researchers at the University of Washington, which included Scott Freeman, Mary Wenderoth, Sarah Eddy, Miles McDonough, Nnadozie Okoroafor, Hannah Jordt, and Michelle Smith, findings about STEM courses utilizing the active learning model illustrated higher pass rates than courses using a traditional lecture model.

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A “Small” Approach to Education with Technology

Education and technology have worked for the betterment of larger institutions and universities. The technology used by these institutions help to solve accessibility issues and are a way for both students and faculty to become acquainted, familiar, and experts with using technology for teaching and learning.

However, some smaller institutions, such as Deep Springs College, simply find the use of technology unsuitable for their specific types of studies, which include academics, involvement with a democratic governance, and a labor program. This brings up the question of whether technology is absolutely necessary for the success and quality of these institutions. Will technology always be a benefit, or is it how it can be applied to solve specific and unique problems that can only be found in certain smaller institutions?

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To Scramble or to Flip: Revising the “Flipped” classroom

The “flipped” classroom concept has been the leading innovative approach to redesigning the classroom for more effective teaching and learning. Since then, many people, including Pamela E. Barnett, associate vice provost and director of the Teaching & Learning Center at Temple University, have questioned the actual value and effectiveness of “flipped” classroom structures. Barnett offers her own reinterpretation of the “flipped” classroom with the “scrambled” or “mixed” classroom.

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6 Ways Technology Will Change Education in the Future

Just recently, a group of academics, venture capitalists, and entrepreneurs gathered at New York University’s Stern School of Business to discuss educational technologies and their effects on the future of higher education. A critical question was posed about the future of higher education as technology continues to play a crucial role in the accessibility and distribution of education: How will higher education and/or the notion of “college” change as platforms, such as MOOCs, become common for others to use as alternatives to the traditional classroom and campus environment?

Stepping in to learn more about what was discussed during the meeting, Issie Lapowsky, a writer for Inc.com, explains how, even though many posed opposing viewpoints on the topic of technology and higher education, all came to a consensus on the simple fact that higher education will have to be restructured and that the “status quo is not an option”, as stated by NYU’s President John Sexton.

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