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Free Textbooks!

There is no question about it, college textbooks are expensive. The U.S. Department of Education has announced an “Open Education” or #GoOpen initiative and ran its first “@GoOpenExchange” to get schools and educators committed to use open educational resources (OER). Institutions such as Ithaca College, The College of William & Mary and Santa Barbara City College are all pushing their schools to adopt OER. The following sources offer free quality digital content to use in your courses without worrying about the price tag.

College Open Textbooks

The College Open Textbooks Collaborative, a collection of twenty-nine educational non-profit and for-profit organizations, is affiliated with more than 200 colleges. This collaborative aims to bring awareness about open textbooks to more than 2000 community and other two-year colleges. Resources include training for instructors adopting open resources, peer reviews of open textbooks. COT offers links to free textbooks by subject, from anthropology to statistics.

Open Textbook Library

Open Textbook Library offers textbooks that have been funded, published, and licensed to be freely used, adapted, and distributed. All the books can be downloaded for no cost or printed at a low cost. This catalog is supported by the University of Minnesota Center for Open Education within the College of Education and Human Development, the library of textbooks pulls titles from multiple sources.

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Photo Credit: Open Textbook Website

Merlot II

The MERLOT project began in 1997, is the grandfather of OER, managed through the California State University System. The current catalog offers nearly 29,000 science and technology resources, 4,600 resources for math and statistics, 8,300 results for humanities and 9,400 for education. These resources are not only textbooks; you can also find case studies, assessment tools, online course modules, journal articles, quizzes, simulation and tutorials.

ORE promotes access, affordability, and student success through the use of open textbooks. With these helpful resources we can ensure more students have access to the textbooks they need to be successful.

For more information, click here

Amazon Now Offers Textbook Rental Service

Amazon introduced its new textbook rental service today, just in time for back-to-school season. Similar to other rental sites like Chegg and UW’s University Bookstore rentals, Amazon offers students the option to pay a fraction of the book’s cover price to borrow the book for 130 days (one semester). Students then send the books back, free of return shipping, in like-new condition. This service is a great idea for students who have a difficult time paying full price for textbooks, but need them for a course.

Textbook rental is nothing new, but a company like Amazon joining the market may change things for it in the near future. Amazon also currently offers eBook rentals, available for reading through their Kindle devices and apps.

Infographic: Open Source Textbooks

Last week, Mashable published an article containing an infographic by onlineschools.org examining open source textbooks. The infographic highlights the advantages of colleges and universities switching to open source textbooks, rough cost estimates as well as what is currently standing in the way of a switch. The graphic below links to the entire infographic and article from Mashable:

McGraw-Hill and Pearson Invest in Inkling

Inkling, a popular company specializing in eBooks, announced on March 23rd a new partnership with very big names in education. On the Inkling blog, CEO Matt MacInnis* had this to say:

Today, we announced new depth to these relationships. Both McGraw-Hill and Pearson, two of the largest educational content providers in the world, have invested in Inkling, signaling a strong endorsement of our approach, our technology and, most of all, our team.

In addition to these investments, we also announced some significant content commitments, including the following:

• The top 100 undergrad titles from McGraw-Hill Higher Education.• The top medical reference titles from McGraw-Hill Professional.
• A full MBA curriculum from Pearson Education.
• Top undergraduate titles from Pearson Education.
• A full medical education curriculum from Wolters Kluwer Health.

This is quite a big step forward for Inkling, and it will be interesting to see where these partnerships take them in the near future! Will students begin to more widely accept eBooks and eReaders as reading devices, now that there are more textbook titles available?

 

 

*If you’re wondering, yes that is the same Inkling representative that was quoted in our article on eReaders a few weeks ago!